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Anything wrong with this build?

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July 19, 2011 8:07:59 PM

Hello,

I'm putting together a new build for moderate gaming (World of Warcraft, Team Fortress 2, etc) and software development use. I usually have lots of apps running at once such as Visual Studio 2010, SQL Server 2008 R2, Outlook, Excel, Word, several browser windows, etc. I'm a little new at this as I used to build my own machines but haven't for about 5 years so obviously everything has changed a bit. I've come up with the following build and am looking for opinions from more experienced people:

Motherboard: ASUS P8P67 Pro
CPU: Intel i5 2500k w/ CoolerMaster Hyper 212+
RAM: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2x4GB)
Case: CoolerMaster HAF X
HD: Western Digital 2TB Black (would love SSD, but trying to save some $$ for now)
PSU: Cooler Master Silent Pro Gold 800W Power Supply
GPU: Raedon HD 6870

I'm particularly unsure about the GPU selection. I just need a good mid-tier video card, I don't want or need top of the line.

Any thoughts on this build? Am I totally off with any of it? Could I do a lot better for minimal extra cost somewhere?

More about : wrong build

July 19, 2011 8:19:23 PM

that PSU is not very reliable and coolermasters are notorious for exploding, you dont need 800W, something like 700W would be fine, (even 650W). and i would reccommend the caviar black series HDDs (or green if you want low noise/less power)
July 19, 2011 8:24:08 PM

ps3hacker12 said:
that PSU is not very reliable and coolermasters are notorious for exploding, you dont need 800W, something like 700W would be fine, (even 650W). and i would reccommend the caviar black series HDDs (or green if you want low noise/less power)


What PSU would you recommend? I guess that's the other weak point in my build. That and the GPU are the two things I know least about in the list of parts I gave.
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July 19, 2011 8:37:09 PM

Corsair, XFX, Antec to name a few are all reliable brands. 500w+ would be the minimum so 650w should be perfect.

The case you've selected, although very nice, is rather "overkill" you could get away with a cheaper Mid Tower ATX case such as HAF 912/922/932 or obviously any other Mid Tower ATX cases you like the look of.





July 19, 2011 8:44:05 PM

AdrianPerry said:
Corsair, XFX, Antec to name a few are all reliable brands. 500w+ would be the minimum so 650w should be perfect.

The case you've selected, although very nice, is rather "overkill" you could get away with a cheaper Mid Tower ATX case such as HAF 912/922/932 or obviously any other Mid Tower ATX cases you like the look of.


I chose the HAF X only to give me room to expand later. This is kind of a base build to get me away from the Gateway POS I currently own and back into a custom build. I'd like to be able to add on down the road so some of what I chose is just to allow for future expansion.

For PSU, what are thoughts on the Corsair HX-750? Again, getting a little more than what I need just because the price difference isn't THAT much.
July 19, 2011 8:49:52 PM

sschluer said:
I chose the HAF X only to give me room to expand later. This is kind of a base build to get me away from the Gateway POS I currently own and back into a custom build. I'd like to be able to add on down the road so some of what I chose is just to allow for future expansion.

For PSU, what are thoughts on the Corsair HX-750? Again, getting a little more than what I need just because the price difference isn't THAT much.


what country are you in? US? UK?

if US, this is the card i would go for:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

and this PSU:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

also what resolutions do you plan on playing at and what games?
July 19, 2011 8:50:26 PM

750w is more than you need for now, but since you mentioned expansion - If you ever planned to Crossfire that 6870 - i think you would need at least a 850w PSU. I might be wrong here since i dont know too much about ATI products but 750w would be cutting it close.

As for the HAF X - You'll have plenty of room for expansion :D  Its HUUUGE
July 19, 2011 9:08:28 PM

Expandability does cost more. Thats fairly obvious.

However, if you KNOW your going to upgrade, whats better...

Paying £100 for a very good PSU now that will last for as long as you need it and provide enough power for any upgrades

OR

Paying £60 now for something cheaper that will work fine, but then needing to pay another £100 anyway to totally replace it when you want to upgrade.

Obviously the pro's must be weighed against the cons and sometimes its just not financially viable at the time. Some things are worth paying "future proof" prices, some things aren't. I notice most people only get DVD Optical Drives, personally i chose to pay a little more for a Blu-Ray drive. Just so its there incase i need it. The price difference was so little, it didnt make sense NOT to do it :) 
July 19, 2011 9:18:31 PM

i agree completely. the hardest part is predicting our own future actions, which can be surprisingly difficult. my experience tells me that many people are alot less likely to ugprade than they initially think (ie. by the time they decide to upgrade, replacement becomes the best option). im not here to convince him to build an unupgradeable system, i just think its important to assess your own spending habits when making these decisions. i see ALOT of people leave these forums with $1000 single gtx 560 ti or hd6950 2gb builds with plans to add another "in a few months", and many of them will never get around to doing it. i think at least some of them would be better suited to a $1000 single gtx 580 build. i will admit that it certainly feels better to build an expandible computer, but computer tech moves so fast, expandibility is often an illusion.
July 19, 2011 9:20:10 PM

genghiskron said:
i agree completely. the hardest part is predicting our own future actions, which can be surprisingly difficult. my experience tells me that many people are alot less likely to ugprade than they initially think (ie. by the time they decide to upgrade, replacement becomes the best option). im not here to convince him to build an unupgradeable system, i just think its important to assess your own spending habits when making these decisions. i see ALOT of people leave these forums with $1000 single gtx 560 ti or hd6950 2gb builds with plans to add another "in a few months", and many of them will never get around to doing it. i think at least some of them would be better suited to a $1000 single gtx 580 build. i will admit that it certainly feels better to build an expandible computer, but computer tech moves so fast, expandibility is often an illusion.


this is true especially since probably in a year or so, cards go out of sale (that second 560Ti becomes discontinued to be replaced by the latest and greatest AMD 7XXX series and GTX6XX series cards.)
July 20, 2011 8:28:26 AM

Yeah i guess i agree there, it really does depend on how serious you are about upgrading. Id like to have my 560Ti in SLI by the end of october ready for the big batch of games before christmas, but obviously disposable income can change so its no guarantee ill get round to doing it.
July 20, 2011 9:20:08 AM

AdrianPerry said:
Yeah i guess i agree there, it really does depend on how serious you are about upgrading. Id like to have my 560Ti in SLI by the end of october ready for the big batch of games before christmas, but obviously disposable income can change so its no guarantee ill get round to doing it.


and i agree with this too, if you come accross a game that you find is struggling with your current card, then having the option of just adding another is really helpful.
!