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Computer Shuts Down when playing games

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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May 11, 2011 6:59:26 AM

My computer keeps shutting down when playing new games; anything that was released after year 2004-2005 makes my computer crash. There is no error message and no bluescreen most of the time, it shutsdown as if the plug was pulled. Yesterday it was cleaned, dusted every fan and even opened my power supply box to dust it off. Also i tried booting my disk multiple time without anything working, i also changed the harddrive it still doesnt work. Its not a heating problem, my system crashes around 40c with the threshold being at 90c.
My computer specs are:
Windows Vista
8190MB RAM
DirectX 11
ASUS EAH5850 Series
ntel(R) Core(TM)2 Quad CPU Q6600 @ 2.40GHz (4 CPUs), ~2.4GHz
Rampage Formula
650W Power supply

My drivers, windows and bios are all updated.

The only hint that seems to tell me something might be wrong is that when i go into the task manage i can see in the Performance tab that my Physical memory looks like this:
Total 8190
Cache 7106
Free 4

Atleast thats what it looks like right now and i'm not even running a game. I dont expect it to get any better when running something that ask more performance then firefox. This might be new thought, i just plugged back my 1tb harddrive and i'm currently experiencing heavy lag while doing mundane things.

I've read the other threads but everyone keeps saying its because of the heat or the power supply and since it doesnt seem to be my problem i've made my own thread and i'm not really sure in wich section i should post this so i just post in the same section as the previous thread i readed.
May 11, 2011 2:13:25 PM

More likely, than not, your power supply is the culprit based on what you stated. How old is the PSU and what make and model is it? Also, are your video drivers and Windows fully updated?
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May 11, 2011 7:32:00 PM

Alright, my power supply is a Coolermaster extreem power duo 650w its 2 years old i think, i dont quite remember when i bought it.

Yesterdays intense lag as died down to leave my computer with booting problems; it takes about 15 minutes reboot, it gets stuck on a black screen and eventually it starts working. I also readed that the physical memory thing is normal. I tried deactivating and running games without my audiocard it didnt work.

Also, i'm currently using a game called Brink to test out my computer, at first my computer kept crashing as soon as the cinematics would start or as soon as anything would work, now i'm able to launch the game with the lowest settings and 800x600 desktop but, whenever some suddent action happens (Grenade, using objects, explosions) my computer shuts down.
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May 11, 2011 8:00:35 PM

I would begin looking at PSU and video card. Sounds like it could be added strain from graphics causing the video card to become unstable. I'm not sure that a PSU issue would cause the machine to take 15 minutes to boot up, but I suppose it's possible. You may be looking at a Windows reinstallation as well. Any number of those crashes could have caused Windows instability and will likely decrease boot-time.
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May 11, 2011 11:23:30 PM

Hmm, my system as crashed quite alot and its really plausible that it would have caused my windows to become instable and slow down my reboot time. I've crashed quite alot.

As for the PSU, is there a way to see if its working incorrectly other then buying a new one and replacing the old one. I'm not quite rich, i dont mind buying a new PSU asap but i would really want to make sure that the power supply is the problem before buying anything.
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May 11, 2011 11:30:02 PM

dgtal9 said:
Hmm, my system as crashed quite alot and its really plausible that it would have caused my windows to become instable and slow down my reboot time. I've crashed quite alot.

As for the PSU, is there a way to see if its working incorrectly other then buying a new one and replacing the old one. I'm not quite rich, i dont mind buying a new PSU asap but i would really want to make sure that the power supply is the problem before buying anything.

The only reliable way is to measure with a PSU tester. Most shops carry them. However, the bench time to test can be as much as a new PSU. There are some software tools available but they are not (arguably) as accurate. Borrowing one from a friend just for troubleshooting (or from another suitable system you may have) is another option.
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May 12, 2011 1:39:37 AM

Run Prime95 & FURMARK on your PC. That will stress your PSU. You also need to consider if your timing setup and bios settings are correct.

You need to establish the stability of your system.

You can always return the PSU in stores like Fry's, Best Buy, if its not the problem. PC stores have 30 day no questions ask return policy
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May 12, 2011 1:41:12 AM

Buy a PSU and return it if you determine that its not the problem.

Update your BIOS and driver
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May 12, 2011 1:45:00 AM

agreed with leon - good advice
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May 12, 2011 2:20:20 AM

Don’t waste your time with a PSU tester substitution of the power supply is the only reliable test. There is a high probability that the power supply is the cause of your problem.
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May 12, 2011 3:47:01 AM

"The only reliable way is to measure with a PSU tester" completely wrong. this will only test if a psu is completely dead or not and does not put the psu under any load. The psu is the most likely problem as you say its completely powering off. I wouldnt try stressing it as you may cause it to blow up potentially damaging other parts.
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May 12, 2011 12:15:12 PM

I stand corrected on the typical PSU testers many may have. All they do is tell you the output on a given connector type and whether you are over- or under- volting. Still, that is more than many software tools can tell you. Testing under load requires a much more detailed analysis and different tools.

That being said. A power supply swap is the OP's best option, as indicated by many here.
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