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Def of Dell PS PFC vs non-PFC

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October 19, 2011 4:14:52 AM

Came across two PSU, H305N-00 and L305P-01 or NH493, the first I believe is a non-PFC PSU while the NH493 is a PFC. But not clear on what the differences are. They don't seem to be interchangeable .... Could you educate me a bit??? THanks

More about : def dell pfc pfc

October 19, 2011 4:36:10 AM

Ok Well it doesn't matter what type as long as you got the right connections
Are you onna install it on a dell or some other type of computer?
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October 19, 2011 4:38:13 AM

But active Psu are way better
but in the end it all goes down to which one is more efficient
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October 19, 2011 4:41:04 AM

Quote :

silentpcreview[/url]"]POWER FACTOR CORRECTION

Increasingly, switched mode power supplies (SMPS) are designed with an active power factor correction (PFC) input stage. This is mainly to meet new regulations aimed at restricting the harmonic content of the load current drawn from power lines. Both users and power companies benefit from PFC, as does the environment.

Power Factor Correction (PFC) can be defined as the reduction of the harmonic content, and/or the aligning of the phase angle of incoming current so that it is in phase with the line voltage. Mathematically, Power Factor (PF) is equal to Real Power (Watts) divided by Apparent Power (Volt*Ampere). The basic concept is to make the input look like a pure resistor. Resistors have a power factor of 1 (unity). This allows the power distribution system to operate at maximum efficiency, which reduces energy consumption.

Non-PFC power supplies use a capacitive filter at the AC input. This results in rectification of the AC line, causes high peak currents at the crests of the AC voltage. These peak currents lead to excessive voltage drops in the wiring and imbalance problems in the three-phase power delivery system. The full energy potential of the AC line is not utilized. Nonlinear peak currents also distort output voltage and create harmonics. There is an international standard for controlling harmonics (IEC100-3-2) and PFC is mandatory for home appliances consuming 70W or more power in EU nations as of January, 2001.

PFC circuits are classified into two types: active and passive.

Passive PFC uses passive elements such as a ferrite core inductor on the input source to create a countering reactance. While easily applied to the existing power circuitry without much modification, the power factor is low (60 - 80%), the AC input must be chosen (115VAC / 230VAC), and the harmonics produced from the difference between the capacitance and the inductance are hard to control. Significant electromagnetic noise can result.

Active PFC uses switching regulator technology with active elements such as IC, FET and diodes, to create a PFC circuit This circuit has a theoretical power factor of over 95%, reduces total harmonics noticeably, and automatically adjusts for AC input voltage. However, it requires a complex EMI filter and an input source circuit, and is more costly to build.

The benefits of high PF for the user comes from the reduced AC current drawn by high PF PSUs, not in any savings from electricity bills, except in the case of commercial utility users who do pay for V(oltage) x A(mperes). There are two broad consequences:

Less stress on the AC electrical wiring: The lower current drawn by a high PF power supply means that there is less stress on the electrical wiring of the building. This can be a big plus in the case of older building with lower capacity AC wiring. It is certainly easy to see the benefits in a enterprise setting where dozens or hundreds of PCs are drawing power. If the total current load from the IT department could be reduced by 30% or more, this would be very signficant in direct electricity savings, reduced airconditioning cost, and possible avoidance of building AC re-wiring.

Lower UPS costs: Lower current draw also means that smaller capacity Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) units can be used. As UPS units are priced in direct proportion to their current capacity (VA), a PF of 0.98 versus one of 0.6 can traslate into a 40% reduction in purchase cost. Again, in an enterprise setting with hundreds or thousands of PCs, the savings can be very significant.

PFC Myths

There are myths about power factor correction that continue to be propagated by well-meaning people. Let's tackle the two most common ones:

Does higher PF reduce my electricity bill? No, if you are a home user. If you are an enterprise running hundreds of PCs and pay not only for power but also VA, then yes. For more details, see PFC discussion above.

Does PFC make a power supply more efficient? Not in the normal way that power supply efficiency is defined, which is the power loss (to heat) as a percentage of total AC input in AC-to-DC conversion. However, in the sense that Apparent AC power (VA) is lowered, PFC does reduce energy consumption.

Power factor correction is applied by an input circuit which uses a small amount of input power. With two PSUs that are identical, equipping one with PFC will cause a typical efficiency drop of 2~4%. Many PSUs that have Active PFC also have high efficiency, as APFC is usually found on higher quality PSUs, but the two are not intrinsically related.
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a c 144 ) Power supply
October 19, 2011 5:21:15 AM

zyoncarlos said:

Many PSUs that have Active PFC also have high efficiency, as APFC is usually found on higher quality PSUs, but the two are not intrinsically related.

This is the key part. Although high efficiency and APFC are not directly related, no PSU manufacturer is going to go through the expense of putting active PFC in a truly junky PSU.

A side benefit of active PFC is that it generally does away with the voltage selection switch on the back of a PSU.

The presence of active PFC should be one of the selection criteria for a PSU.
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October 19, 2011 5:28:37 AM

zyoncarlos said:
Ok Well it doesn't matter what type as long as you got the right connections
Are you onna install it on a dell or some other type of computer?


Install it on a Dell Dim E520. Original PSU in the PC was a H305N-00. I received a Dell PSU L305P-01/ NH493, but it doesn't seem to function properly when I first plug the power cord into the PSU.

Thanks for the info on PFC! Not clear as to why the NH493 unit is having issues in the Dell E520.
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October 19, 2011 5:41:46 PM

zyoncarlos said:
Ok Well it doesn't matter what type as long as you got the right connections
Are you onna install it on a dell or some other type of computer?



OK, so after reading info here on PFC and non-PFC, why won't the L305P-01/ NH493 PSU work in my Dell Dim E520, but the H305N-00 PSU does?

PC came with the H305N-00 version. Was shipped a NH493 PSU and it kept rebooting at random times after the system came up in Windows session.

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October 19, 2011 10:28:55 PM

Can someone confirm this, but I think Dell still uses different pinouts for the power connectors, so if you switch PSUs you could fry stuff.
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October 20, 2011 12:12:37 AM

fb39ca4 said:
Can someone confirm this, but I think Dell still uses different pinouts for the power connectors, so if you switch PSUs you could fry stuff.



Well so far everything is OK after I installed a H305N-00 PSU, the original type, i.e., nothing got fried when I put in the L305P-01/ NH493 PSU in the Dell E520. It just didn't seem to function in the way I expected when I put in the L305P-01/ NH493.

Dell even says the L305P-01/ NH493 is for a E520. Maybe there are different Mobos for a E520???

Anyway, I'm sticking with the H305N-00 PSU, since it works!

Any info you guys can come up with on the differences between these two types of PSU might help explain why the L305P-01/ NH493 PSU kept causing the PC to reboot.
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