What GTX 560 Ti to get?

Hi guys!

I gonna build a new rig soon. I think that's what I gonna put into it:

MAINBOARD S-1155 ASUS P8P67 WS REVOLUTION

INTEL CORE I7 2600K 3,4GHz

RAM Corsair Vengeance DDR3 8 GB 1600 MHz

Corsair TX2 850 W

WESTERN Digital Caviar Black 1,5 TB

2,5" SSD disc Kingston 64 GB V100 PC (if the budget allows)

NZXT M59 chase

The only thing I still need is the GPU. I'm sure it's gonna be the 560 Ti chipset, but I don't know which brand to get, I was thinking about GV-N560SO-1GI-950. Is it any good? Should I look for something else?

Thanks for opinions and advice
63 answers Last reply
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  1. what is your budget? is this for gaming?

    if you have no budget then get something better than the 560, like a GTX 570 or a Radeon HD 6970

    and if your on a budget drop your CPU to a 2500k and invest that extra money into a better graphics card, like the ones mentioned above.
  2. I went for the Palit Sonic's, I know that there a few folk on here who can be quite vocal in their dislike for the brand but as I've not seen any issues with the company I thought I'd give them a go and so far things have been fine and these cards rock! [:mousemonkey:4]
  3. This topic has been moved from the section CPU & Components to section Graphics & Displays by Mousemonkey
  4. amk09 said:
    what is your budget? is this for gaming?

    if you have no budget then get something better than the 560, like a GTX 570 or a Radeon HD 6970

    and if your on a budget drop your CPU to a 2500k and invest that extra money into a better graphics card, like the ones mentioned above.


    I am on a budget of about 1,500 EUR. I might just get the GTX 570 since I don't really need an SSD disc.
  5. I disagree with your opinion that an SSD is optional for gaming. An SSD will eliminate the drive access bottleneck and speed up your games more than the increase in a GPU.

    I'd suggest a couple of alternatives: (1) go with the AMD 6950 and try to flash it to the 6970 for a few Euros more than the GTX 560 ti; (2) try to pick up a lightly used GTX 470 (about 175 Euros) or GTX 560 ti and OC it.

    BTW the i7 2600 K is a wonderful processor, but overkill for gaming. You can save about 100 Euros if you go with the i5 2500 K.

    The ASUS Revolution is also a good board, but the ASRock Extreme6 is competitive on features and 50 Euro cheaper.

    If you are not going to Crossfire or SLI the 850 Corsair PSU is also overkill. The Corsair 650 TX would pe pleanty.

    I am not saying that you should skimp on quality, but you are looking at components that are higher priced than quality competitors and will not give you any more bang for the buck.

    And if you went with the ASRock, Corsair 650 & i5 2500K you could probably afford the GTX 570.
  6. chesteracorgi said:
    I disagree with your opinion that an SSD is optional for gaming. An SSD will eliminate the drive access bottleneck and speed up your games more than the increase in a GPU.

    I'd suggest a couple of alternatives: (1) go with the AMD 6950 and try to flash it to the 6970 for a few Euros more than the GTX 560 ti; (2) try to pick up a lightly used GTX 470 (about 175 Euros) or GTX 560 ti and OC it.

    BTW the i7 2600 K is a wonderful processor, but overkill for gaming. You can save about 100 Euros if you go with the i5 2500 K.

    The ASUS Revolution is also a good board, but the ASRock Extreme6 is competitive on features and 50 Euro cheaper.

    If you are not going to Crossfire or SLI the 850 Corsair PSU is also overkill. The Corsair 650 TX would pe pleanty.

    I am not saying that you should skimp on quality, but you are looking at components that are higher priced than quality competitors and will not give you any more bang for the buck.

    And if you went with the ASRock, Corsair 650 & i5 2500K you could probably afford the GTX 570.


    Well, I thought that games load the files they need on RAM before they actually need them and an SSD would therefore only speed up the loading times :p

    I am planning on doing an SLI with two GTX 560's down the road when a single card is no longer sufficient, so I guess I need the PSU I've got in my config.


    You are right, the i5 CPU might be a better choice because all the games and SW I use can't benefit form all the threads i7 has to offer, making it an overkill.

    Picking the right mobo has been a pain through out this built. But I think I can figure it out. Probably gonna get a striped down version of the Asus board named in the config.


    BTW: What do you think about this GPU: GV-N560OC-1GI? Gigabyte has already OCed it and they give you the warranty for the OC model. You can't use your warranty if you OC a GPU yourself.
  7. Mousemonkey said:
    I went for the Palit Sonic's, I know that there a few folk on here who can be quite vocal in their dislike for the brand but as I've not seen any issues with the company I thought I'd give them a go and so far things have been fine and these cards rock! [:mousemonkey:4]


    How much time is so far?

    I'm asking because I've read hear that some people had negative experience with those fancy OC models from Gigabyte. They say that the card stopped working after few days or weeks and this is not how I like it. I wanna know if this brand is any different. To me, durability of components is important.
  8. One more question.

    I've looked into the specifications of the i5 2500K and under Memory specs >>> Memory type it said: DDR3-1066/1333.

    Does this mean that the CPU doesn't actually support RAM with higher frequencies, like the one from Corsair in my config?
  9. Judging from your earlier posts, the following are the main priorities before purchasing :
    - Price / Value
    - Overclocking Ability
    - Durability

    Add
    - Noise Levels.

    Three 560's achieve 1000+ Mhz with or without minimal voltage increases:

    - MSI GTX 560 Ti Twin Frozr II OC
    - ASUS GTX 560 Ti DirectCU II
    - Gigabyte SOC 560 Ti

    1 - Exclude the Gigabyte, worse
    2 - The MSI has a superior cooling system with 4 8mm heatsink pipes.
    3 - Asus has 3 6mm pipes, a bit noisier.
  10. Domenus said:
    One more question.

    I've looked into the specifications of the i5 2500K and under Memory specs >>> Memory type it said: DDR3-1066/1333.

    Does this mean that the CPU doesn't actually support RAM with higher frequencies, like the one from Corsair in my config?


    This is a RAM clock rate at which the CPU's memory controller normally operates for (JEDEC standard). However it supports much higher speeds, even 2000+ Mhz. The actual limiting factor of RAM clock frequency is the Motherboard. Check mobo specs to determine if it supports the RAM.

    Also, DDR3-1600 seems to be Sandy Bridge's sweet spot. Don't worry about CAS latency, the difference is not significant.
  11. pyoverdin said:
    Judging from your earlier posts, the following are the main priorities before purchasing :
    - Price / Value
    - Overclocking Ability
    - Durability

    Add
    - Noise Levels.

    Three 560's achieve 1000+ Mhz with or without minimal voltage increases:

    - MSI GTX 560 Ti Twin Frozr II OC
    - ASUS GTX 560 Ti DirectCU II
    - Gigabyte SOC 560 Ti

    1 - Exclude the Gigabyte, worse
    2 - The MSI has a superior cooling system with 4 8mm heatsink pipes.
    3 - Asus has 3 6mm pipes, a bit noisier.


    The list you've made will make things quite easier :)

    at No. 1 you wrote to exclude Gigabyte. Why is that?

    Could you send me the exact code of the products (e.g. ENGTX560 Ti DCII TOP)? That's just to make sure which GPU's you have in mind and that I can check availability at my local distributor. ( I can't just order it at Newegg, because I live in a smaller country in middle Europe)
  12. pyoverdin said:
    This is a RAM clock rate at which the CPU's memory controller normally operates for (JEDEC standard). However it supports much higher speeds, even 2000+ Mhz. The actual limiting factor of RAM clock frequency is the Motherboard. Check mobo specs to determine if it supports the RAM.

    Also, DDR3-1600 seems to be Sandy Bridge's sweet spot. Don't worry about CAS latency, the difference is not significant.


    Thanks for that info.

    I always make sure that mobo supports the RAM frequency.
  13. The Gigabyte SOC is the one I would get. It has one of the highest factory overclocks, upgraded components, and one of the quietest and most effective coolers you can get.
  14. Domenus said:
    How much time is so far?

    I'm asking because I've read hear that some people had negative experience with those fancy OC models from Gigabyte. They say that the card stopped working after few days or weeks and this is not how I like it. I wanna know if this brand is any different. To me, durability of components is important.


    I've had them for about a month and left them folding 24/7 for a few days a couple of times to see if they break and they haven't yet, and I also have them and a 2600K running on a 620w PSU so an 850w one is still overkill.
  15. Note that quite a few of the factory-overclocked 560 Ti graphics cards in the 950MHz-1000MHz range are having problems with either overheating or maintaining their overclocks. People who bought these have had to down-clock them to get them stable in games and such.

    Because of this I suggest getting a factory-overclocked 560 Ti card that keeps the core clock at 900MHz or below and then overclocking it beyond that speed yourself if you feel adventurous.
  16. chesteracorgi said:
    I disagree with your opinion that an SSD is optional for gaming. An SSD will eliminate the drive access bottleneck and speed up your games more than the increase in a GPU.
    .


    An SSD will get the game started quicker (level load times, etc.), but will contribute exactly nothing towards higher framerates in the game. In gaming systems, the gpu is 85% of the performance equation at 1080P or above....

    I'd much rather wait 10 seconds longer for the game to start and have 60 fps than to have it load 'quickly' (45-50 sec)and be rewarded with 25 fps....
  17. mdd1963: ^+1
  18. pyoverdin said:


    Thanks :)
  19. Mousemonkey said:
    I've had them for about a month and left them folding 24/7 for a few days a couple of times to see if they break and they haven't yet, and I also have them and a 2600K running on a 620w PSU so an 850w one is still overkill.


    So you have an SLI, correct?
  20. Domenus said:
    So you have an SLI, correct?

    Yes, I do.
  21. pyoverdin said:


    BTW: Do you have any experience with the Newegg store? It seems a good place to order things, but I'm not sure about the delivery. Can they ship to Europe?
  22. Here I have my new config:

    Intel Core i5 2500K 3,3 GHz, 1155

    RAM Corsair Vengeance DDR3 8 GB 1600 MHz

    Corsair TX2 650 W PSU (I've calculated it and saw that it's more than enough)

    ASUS GTX 560 Ti DirectCU II

    MSI P67A-GD65
    S1155

    the same HDD, chase

    and it would cost me 980EUR

    Opinions?
  23. Leaps-from-Shadows said:
    Note that quite a few of the factory-overclocked 560 Ti graphics cards in the 950MHz-1000MHz range are having problems with either overheating or maintaining their overclocks. People who bought these have had to down-clock them to get them stable in games and such.

    Because of this I suggest getting a factory-overclocked 560 Ti card that keeps the core clock at 900MHz or below and then overclocking it beyond that speed yourself if you feel adventurous.



    That is correct and Gigabyte is the worst out there at this time. Their 1gz cards are becoming less and less common on the market.
  24. Domenus said:
    Here I have my new config:

    Intel Core i5 2500K 3,3 GHz, 1155

    RAM Corsair Vengeance DDR3 8 GB 1600 MHz

    Corsair TX2 650 W PSU (I've calculated it and saw that it's more than enough)

    ASUS GTX 560 Ti DirectCU II

    MSI P67A-GD65
    S1155

    the same HDD, chase

    and it would cost me 980EUR

    Opinions?


    Assuming the psu is not a lemon and every thing goes well you did rather well for your choice of parts. I
  25. Very nice, The Corsair TX 650 is a Seasonic PSU and has good reviews. But I can't argue with the 850.

    Is the ASUS GTX 560 ti a twin fan? The twin fan cooler models tend to run cooler than the reference models. It's worth the extra euros if you plan to OC. Even if you don't OC a well cooled PGU will last longer than the reference models.
  26. Let me know if the RAM runs in dual channel on that mobo, because it doesn't on mine.
  27. Mousemonkey said:
    Let me know if the RAM runs in dual channel on that mobo, because it doesn't on mine.

    There's no reason why a 2x4GB Vengeance kit wouldn't run in dual-channel on any H67/P67/Z68 board, except for defective board/RAM or incorrect arrangement of the sticks.
  28. Leaps-from-Shadows said:
    There's no reason why a 2x4GB Vengeance kit wouldn't run in dual-channel on any H67/P67/Z68 board, except for defective board/RAM or incorrect arrangement of the sticks.

    Well it's not on the QVL list and I've tried all possible configurations and still no dual channel according to CPUz.
  29. chesteracorgi said:
    Very nice, The Corsair TX 650 is a Seasonic PSU and has good reviews. But I can't argue with the 850.

    Is the ASUS GTX 560 ti a twin fan? The twin fan cooler models tend to run cooler than the reference models. It's worth the extra euros if you plan to OC. Even if you don't OC a well cooled PGU will last longer than the reference models.


    Yap, it is a twin fan. And a good loking card too.

  30. nforce4max said:
    Assuming the psu is not a lemon and every thing goes well you did rather well for your choice of parts. I


    I'm happy with it, but I'm not 100% sure about the mobo. Since the grapahic card is from Asus, it would make sense to get an Asus mobo too to achive the best performance, right?
  31. Beacause I have quiet some money left from my 1,5K budget, I might use the money left and get the GTX 570 instead of the 560. Any suggestions on brand?
  32. Domenus said:
    I'm happy with it, but I'm not 100% sure about the mobo. Since the grapahic card is from Asus, it would make sense to get an Asus mobo too to achive the best performance, right?


    You don't have to do brand matching. You can use any choice of boar you like. Hell wait a while for a modded bios to pop up and flash it to run on a mac if possible. In short you do not need to buy a Asus board to use your card.
  33. Domenus said:
    Beacause I have quiet some money left from my 1,5K budget, I might use the money left and get the GTX 570 instead of the 560. Any suggestions on brand?


    I suggest a reference card rather than a aftermarket model due to the methods of cooling.
  34. Mousemonkey said:
    Well it's not on the QVL list and I've tried all possible configurations and still no dual channel according to CPUz.

    Not being on the QVL wouldn't prevent it from running in dual-channel.

    If you have the RAM in the right slots**, then it's in dual-channel. The H67/P67 boards either don't have the channel info in an easily-accessible place or the people at CPU-Z just haven't found it yet. Remember, it would say single-channel in CPU-Z if it positively wasn't in dual-channel mode. Instead, it's just blank (or at least, mine is). That means CPU-Z doesn't know.

    Hell, my ASRock board's newest BIOS (from just a few days ago) is the only one that has identified my RAM arrangement as dual-channel in the BIOS itself, but I knew it was from the beginning.

    Edit: **Slot config for two RAM sticks in dual-channel:
    Slot 1 (closest to CPU): Empty
    Slot 2: RAM
    Slot 3: Empty
    Slot 4: RAM

    If ASUS says "put the RAM in these slots and it will be dual-channel" you can bet it's in dual-channel, no matter what CPU-Z says.
  35. Leaps-from-Shadows said:
    Not being on the QVL wouldn't prevent it from running in dual-channel.

    If you have the RAM in the right slots**, then it's in dual-channel. The H67/P67 boards either don't have the channel info in an easily-accessible place or the people at CPU-Z just haven't found it yet. Remember, it would say single-channel in CPU-Z if it positively wasn't in dual-channel mode. Instead, it's just blank (or at least, mine is). That means CPU-Z doesn't know.

    Hell, my ASRock board's newest BIOS (from just a few days ago) is the only one that has identified my RAM arrangement as dual-channel in the BIOS itself, but I knew it was from the beginning.

    Edit: **Slot config for two RAM sticks in dual-channel:
    Slot 1 (closest to CPU): Empty
    Slot 2: RAM
    Slot 3: Empty
    Slot 4: RAM

    If ASUS says "put the RAM in these slots and it will be dual-channel" you can bet it's in dual-channel, no matter what CPU-Z says.

    That's what I'm hoping, this isn't exactly the first rig I've ever built and I would like to think that I know which slots to put things in.
  36. Mousemonkey said:
    That's what I'm hoping, this isn't exactly the first rig I've ever built and I would like to think that I know which slots to put things in.


    Dual channel could still be enabled and one way to find out is to run a few benchmarks and real world applications that are sensitive to system memory i/o performance. If significantly lower than normal for such a system that you recently built then you already know but does not give you the solution to your problem. Have you contacted customer service for advice or potential rma?
  37. No, because I'm not really fussed about it tbh. It chucks out benchmark numbers that are comparable with similar systems (according to Futuremark at least) and the only two games installed at the moment (Crysis 2 & AvP) both run with high triple figure framerates.
  38. Mousemonkey said:
    No, because I'm not really fussed about it tbh. It chucks out benchmark numbers that are comparable with similar systems (according to Futuremark at least) and the only two games installed at the moment (Crysis 2 & AvP) both run with high triple figure framerates.


    Then try some other games or applications that are sensitive to this area of performance and if the number are similar to that of other systems then there should be no concern.
  39. Mousemonkey said:
    I went for the Palit Sonic's, I know that there a few folk on here who can be quite vocal in their dislike for the brand but as I've not seen any issues with the company I thought I'd give them a go and so far things have been fine and these cards rock! [:mousemonkey:4]



    hey mouse, how is the minimum fps figures on your 560ti sli setup? do you experience any so called micro-stuttering? when I had 6870s in crossfire, this was a problem and I was wondering if you experienced the same with your sli setup.
  40. nforce4max said:
    Then try some other games or applications that are sensitive to this area of performance and if the number are similar to that of other systems then there should be no concern.

    I'm not and never was looking for help or advice, I just asked the OP to let me know if the RAM ran in dual channel mode on the motherboard that they choose to go with.
  41. jjb8675309 said:
    hey mouse, how is the minimum fps figures on your 560ti sli setup? do you experience any so called micro-stuttering? when I had 6870s in crossfire, this was a problem and I was wondering if you experienced the same with your sli setup.

    On the couple of games that I have installed (Crysis 2 and AvP) the fps's only drop to the 120's or so! And I've never had 'microstutter' with this or any of my other SLi rigs, maybe because I choose the right combination of parts to build them with or maybe because the phenomenon doesn't really exist.
  42. thanks well that is good to hear I was considering gtx 460 sli for a value oriented backup system I was putting together, for 300ish in the states it is not a bad deal for the performance, although I am a bit wary from my previous exprience with crossfire, thanks
  43. jjb8675309 said:
    thanks well that is good to hear I was considering gtx 460 sli for a value oriented backup system I was putting together, for 300ish in the states it is not a bad deal for the performance, although I am a bit wary from my previous exprience with crossfire, thanks


    Unlike ati nvidia does much better with their software and sli in general does not have all the little issues that is common to crossfire.
    Two way sli is the best overall for scaling and bang for buck. As for the gtx 460 you need to be very careful which models that you get due to quality issues. They are however very modder friendly and easy to maintain once the main issues have been worked out.
  44. which pair would you recommend if I were to pull the trigger today? how about 2 of the 2 gig models?
  45. jjb8675309 said:
    which pair would you recommend if I were to pull the trigger today? how about 2 of the 2 gig models?


    Only Palit and Evga doe the 2GB models. I suggest that you reconsider this because the gtx 460 isn't very well equipped as far as cooling is concerned. If you want to learn how to mod then go for it but performance wise you will really notice in games that take advantage of sli/crossfire. If you are set no matter what then MSI hawk or evga EE as they are both very easy work with. The MSI is good if you add a cooler(s) to the power vrm then you will have a much more solid card than it was out of the box. The evga ee is going to take some more work but is better off than what I and others have bought. If you do land one or two of them maybe they would have included the power vrm cooler that is offered on their website.

    EVGA EE for external exhaust
    MSI Hawk for high quality pcb and easily modded.
    Other is Asus.
  46. ok thanks for the solid advise
  47. so basically you are saying that if I buy a 2 460s for sli then I will have vrm overheating issues unless I mod?
  48. jjb8675309 said:
    so basically you are saying that if I buy a 2 460s for sli then I will have vrm overheating issues unless I mod?


    They overheat any way sli or not. The core remains cool and the vram is tolerable but the power vrm is well known to run very hot. The highest documented temp is 153c which is a death sentence but most live any ware from three months to maybe a year before they fail but this is a process of gradual degradation that results in known problems. Mod them any way and then they will last. The pcb on these cards is very good overall and their compact size is welcomed. I should take pics of mine some time.
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