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Reduce the high image compression in Kodak DX6490 camera

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Anonymous
March 17, 2005 10:51:03 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Is there any way to reduce the high image compression in Kodak DX6490
camera.

- Sanjay
March 17, 2005 12:53:48 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Yes!

Carefully pick up the camera, carry it over to the garbage can, and
insert. Then go buy something that actually has a reasonable
uncompressed image mode..... kidding....

Push the"menu" button, in still mode. Then navigate to "picture
quality" and select the most stars. Unfortunately, it's still a bit
overcompressed, but it's a lot better than the default. See the link
below:

http://www.kodak.com/global/en/service/publications/urg...

ECM
Anonymous
March 18, 2005 12:25:03 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

sanjay.bolade@gmail.com wrote:
> Is there any way to reduce the high image compression in Kodak DX6490
> camera.
>
> - Sanjay
>

Unfortunately not. The compression (and sharpening) is only a problem if you
want to post process the image. Good indoor shots can be achieved with a cheap
(US$50) external bounce flash mounted on an 'L' bracket. Then no post processing
is required. I used an incablitz auto flash with my Kodak DX6490. It also works
very well with my Nikon D70.

--
Ben Thomas
Kodak DX6490 & Nikon D70
Related resources
March 18, 2005 12:25:04 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <hv8pg2-kdg.ln1@centauri.unico.com.au>, nosp@m.thanks.mate says...
> sanjay.bolade@gmail.com wrote:
> > Is there any way to reduce the high image compression in Kodak DX6490
> > camera.
> >
> > - Sanjay
> >
>
> Unfortunately not. The compression (and sharpening) is only a problem if you
> want to post process the image. Good indoor shots can be achieved with a cheap
> (US$50) external bounce flash mounted on an 'L' bracket. Then no post processing
> is required. I used an incablitz auto flash with my Kodak DX6490. It also works
> very well with my Nikon D70.
>
> --
> Ben Thomas
> Kodak DX6490 & Nikon D70
>

When I use the Kodak 6490 indoors I use it with the Sunpak 383 on a handle
bracket. It can do some nice quality snapshots, and the zoom can "reach out
and touch" some fair wildlife shots, but due to its high image compression,
and the resulting artifacts, its photos dont lend themselves to a lot of
"post" work. You need to get it right IN THE CAMERA with the 6490, and even
if you do, you will have to put up with a lot of jpg compression.

Its a damn shame really, a camera that cost $500 (US) shouldn't have this
particular flaw.


--
Larry Lynch
Mystic, Ct.
Anonymous
March 18, 2005 6:52:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Greetings Sanjay,

I have not found the compression of the DX6490 to be high or overcompressed?
Rather, as far I can recall it is about 5:1 normal and a good ratio for a
general use digital camera. You should be able to do pretty much anything
with the camera and get good results. If you shoot a lot of indoor shots or
are an action shooter, a good external flash is the accessory you might want
to consider as it will enhance the ability of the camera to extend the flash
range.

What are you seeing that leads you to believe the images are over
compressed? Do you have an example? Talk to you soon, Sanjay, Glad to help.

Ron Baird
Eastman Kodak Company




<sanjay.bolade@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1111074663.094242.225730@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> Is there any way to reduce the high image compression in Kodak DX6490
> camera.
>
> - Sanjay
>
Anonymous
March 28, 2005 11:22:44 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Thanks for the reply Ron,
I haven't tried indoor photography with an external flash till now.

I usually use automatic mode. There are a few images of mine, which
smudge?? or has the appearance of overcompression. Let me know if i
could send these images. It would be great if you let me what might be
the reasons for these kind of images.

Also, is there a detailed guide, which would explain what exactly is
the PASM settings. I often end up getting bad shots in this mode.

Sanjay
sanjay.bolade at gmail.com






Ron Baird wrote:
> Greetings Sanjay,
>
> I have not found the compression of the DX6490 to be high or
overcompressed?
> Rather, as far I can recall it is about 5:1 normal and a good ratio
for a
> general use digital camera. You should be able to do pretty much
anything
> with the camera and get good results. If you shoot a lot of indoor
shots or
> are an action shooter, a good external flash is the accessory you
might want
> to consider as it will enhance the ability of the camera to extend
the flash
> range.
>
> What are you seeing that leads you to believe the images are over
> compressed? Do you have an example? Talk to you soon, Sanjay, Glad
to help.
>
> Ron Baird
> Eastman Kodak Company
>
>
>
>
> <sanjay.bolade@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:1111074663.094242.225730@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> > Is there any way to reduce the high image compression in Kodak
DX6490
> > camera.
> >
> > - Sanjay
> >
March 28, 2005 2:27:23 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <1112023364.749566.16010@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>,
sanjay.bolade@gmail.com says...
> >
> > <sanjay.bolade@gmail.com> wrote in message
> > news:1111074663.094242.225730@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> > > Is there any way to reduce the high image compression in Kodak
> DX6490
> > > camera.
> > >
> > > - Sanjay
> > >
>
>

I'll give you the answer that Ron avoided.

No, there is no way to make up for the overcompression in the images from the
6490.

I have mentioned before that I felt this flaw took the 6490 from the
possibility of being a GREAT camera, to being a "snapshot camera" suitable
only for 6x4 prints.

If the artifacting from over compression didn't show up in my 5x7 prints, I
would have no complaint about the 6490. Its a shame, really.


--
Larry Lynch
Mystic, Ct.
Anonymous
March 28, 2005 4:39:35 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <1112023364.749566.16010@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>,
sanjay.bolade@gmail.com says...
>
> Also, is there a detailed guide, which would explain what exactly is
> the PASM settings. I often end up getting bad shots in this mode.
>

The PASM mode isn't that hard to understand once you figure it out. PASM
stands for (P)rogram, (A)perture priority, (S)hutter priority, and (M)
anual.

In PASM mode you can use the menu to change the ISO setting, white
balance, color mode, exposure metering, focus zone, and sharpness
settings of the camera.

Generally I leave ISO set to AUTO because increase ISO also increases
noise. Your best bet is to use the flash or if your subject is static
use a tripod. White balance is another setting I ussually leave to AUTO
unless I see a need to change it. Color mode will be a matter of
personnal preference. Take a shot of various subjects in each mode and
see which you like the best.

Changing exposure metering can be very useful under certain conditions.
For instance if you are shooting a backlit subject you may want to
switch to spot or center weighted metering to get the best results.

Focus zone like exposure metering could also be useful at times. By
default the camera uses multizone. If you are having a hard time
focusing you might try switching it to center zone.

Sharpness is another setting I leave alone. You can get better results
with a photo editor.

So much for the menu options. You'll find the PASM mode quite useful at
times.

In (P)rogram mode the camera sets the Aperture and Shutter speed for
you, but you can change the exposure compensation to lighten or darken
the image. I find this useful for taking pictures of snow where the
camera want to make the picture too dark.

In (A)perture priority mode you can change the f-stop and the camera
sets the Shutter speed. This mode allows you to control the depth of
field of the shot. A larger aperture (smaller f-stop #) allows a shallow
depth so that only your subject is in focus, closer further objects are
blurred. A smaller aperture (larger #) gives you more depth of field and
allows more of the scene to be in focus. When using this mode keep an
eye on the shutter speed. If it gets to long you may need a tripod.

In (S)hutter priority mode you set the shutter speed and the camera sets
the aperture. This is good for action shots where you want to freeze the
action or night shots where you want a slow shutter speed. If you use a
slow shutter speed you need a tripod.

In (M)anual mode you control both shutter speed and aperture and the
camera controls exposure compensation. This bothers me to no end. In my
opinion the camera should leave the EV at 0 in manual mode. The reason
you use manual mode is to have full control of the shot.

When using any of the PASM modes if the numbers turn red then your out
of range of what the camera can adjust to.

If you want a more detailed explanation of any of the menu settings or
program modes feel free to ask here or to email me.

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Anonymous
March 28, 2005 6:50:40 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Mon, 28 Mar 2005 10:27:23 -0500, Larry
<lastingimagery@comcast.dotnet> wrote:

>In article <1112023364.749566.16010@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>,
>sanjay.bolade@gmail.com says...
>> >
>> > <sanjay.bolade@gmail.com> wrote in message
>> > news:1111074663.094242.225730@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>> > > Is there any way to reduce the high image compression in Kodak
>> DX6490
>> > > camera.
>> > >
>> > > - Sanjay
>> > >
>>
>>
>
>I'll give you the answer that Ron avoided.
>
>No, there is no way to make up for the overcompression in the images from the
>6490.
>
>I have mentioned before that I felt this flaw took the 6490 from the
>possibility of being a GREAT camera, to being a "snapshot camera" suitable
>only for 6x4 prints.
>
>If the artifacting from over compression didn't show up in my 5x7 prints, I
>would have no complaint about the 6490. Its a shame, really.
>
>
>--
>Larry Lynch
>Mystic, Ct.

Let me add ...

From what I can see the overly high JPEG compression is followed by a
little too much sharpening to bring lost details back.

This results in the halo effects as seen at Steve's DigiCams
http://www.steves-digicams.com/ for all sample images from Kodak
cameras.

.... note the power lines and the edges of rooftops against the light
sky background ...

[hi rez files - may load slow]

http://www.steves-digicams.com/2004_reviews/dx7440/samp...
http://www.steves-digicams.com/2004_reviews/dx7630/samp...

Compare the same shots to similar P&S cameras like the:

Canon A-85
http://www.steves-digicams.com/2004_reviews/a85/samples...

Sony DSC-W1
http://www.steves-digicams.com/2004_reviews/sony_w1/sam...

Kodak has applied just a tad too much sharpening for my taste. But
knowing that I still bought a Kodak DX7440 over the two cameras
mentioned above because IMHO it takes better photos and was a far
better price.

Hap

PS: No offense to Ron Baird of Eastman Kodak. We know you have passed
our complaints on and must be weary from reading them. LOL.
Anonymous
March 28, 2005 11:43:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Hap Shaughnessy wrote:
> On Mon, 28 Mar 2005 10:27:23 -0500, Larry
> <lastingimagery@comcast.dotnet> wrote:
>
>
>>In article <1112023364.749566.16010@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>,
>>sanjay.bolade@gmail.com says...
>>
>>>><sanjay.bolade@gmail.com> wrote in message
>>>>news:1111074663.094242.225730@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>>>>
>>>>>Is there any way to reduce the high image compression in Kodak
>>>
>>>DX6490
>>>
>>>>>camera.
>>>>>
>>>>>- Sanjay
>>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>I'll give you the answer that Ron avoided.
>>
>>No, there is no way to make up for the overcompression in the images from the
>>6490.
>>
>>I have mentioned before that I felt this flaw took the 6490 from the
>>possibility of being a GREAT camera, to being a "snapshot camera" suitable
>>only for 6x4 prints.
>>
>>If the artifacting from over compression didn't show up in my 5x7 prints, I
>>would have no complaint about the 6490. Its a shame, really.
>>
>>
>>--
>>Larry Lynch
>>Mystic, Ct.
>
>
> Let me add ...
>
> From what I can see the overly high JPEG compression is followed by a
> little too much sharpening to bring lost details back.
>
> This results in the halo effects as seen at Steve's DigiCams
> http://www.steves-digicams.com/ for all sample images from Kodak
> cameras.
>
> ... note the power lines and the edges of rooftops against the light
> sky background ...
>
> [hi rez files - may load slow]
>
> http://www.steves-digicams.com/2004_reviews/dx7440/samp...
> http://www.steves-digicams.com/2004_reviews/dx7630/samp...
>
> Compare the same shots to similar P&S cameras like the:
>
> Canon A-85
> http://www.steves-digicams.com/2004_reviews/a85/samples...
>
> Sony DSC-W1
> http://www.steves-digicams.com/2004_reviews/sony_w1/sam...
>
> Kodak has applied just a tad too much sharpening for my taste. But
> knowing that I still bought a Kodak DX7440 over the two cameras
> mentioned above because IMHO it takes better photos and was a far
> better price.
>
> Hap
>
> PS: No offense to Ron Baird of Eastman Kodak. We know you have passed
> our complaints on and must be weary from reading them. LOL.

I believe the DX7440 allows setting a lower compression factor, right?
Wish my DX6440 did. Some shots are really messed up by overcompression,
especially in the case of trees, and grass.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
March 29, 2005 3:00:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Hap Shaughnessy wrote:
[]
> PNG wasn't accepted as hoped for the Internet or Usenet and so it has
> been passed over for everything else too. It would have been a perfect
> lossy format comparable with TIFF and small enough in file size for
> reasonable write times in digital cameras.

PNG can accept 16-bit data and also be lossless. It's certainly my
preferred format. Pity the camera manufacturers have chosen TIFF instead.

David
Anonymous
March 29, 2005 3:00:01 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Tue, 29 Mar 2005 11:00:00 GMT, "David J Taylor"
<david-taylor@blueyonder.co.not-this-bit.nor-this-part.uk> wrote:

>Hap Shaughnessy wrote:
>[]
>> PNG wasn't accepted as hoped for the Internet or Usenet and so it has
>> been passed over for everything else too. It would have been a perfect
>> lossy format comparable with TIFF and small enough in file size for
>> reasonable write times in digital cameras.
>
>PNG can accept 16-bit data and also be lossless. It's certainly my
>preferred format. Pity the camera manufacturers have chosen TIFF instead.
>
>David

David, thanks for catching that error.

After I posted my reply to Ron Hunter I realized I had typed lossy for
the PNG format. Ooops.

It should have been "Lossless" regarding it's compression. & like TIFF
this format also has an alpha channel that can be used to save masks.
Very handy.

For those that would like to learn more about this excellent image
format that's file sizes aren't much larger than JPEGs go to:

PNG (Portable Network Graphics) Home Site
http://www.libpng.org/pub/png/

Hap
Anonymous
March 29, 2005 8:19:17 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <a4vh41558ius21896dei8ng005n7cjito2@4ax.com>, hap@lac-du-
possum.ca says...
> My DX7440 has image quality JPEG standard and fine. I would like to
> see a third Extra or Super Fine setting as seen with many other brands
> of P&S digital cameras.
>
The thing that irks me is that this would be quite simple to add in a
firmware update, but when I emailed Kodak my request fell on deaf ears.

I have the DX6490 and the high compression normally does present a
problem, but there are times I'd like to see the ability to save as a
TIFF file. My other gripe is when in manual mode the camera attemps to
"correct" your settings by adjusting the EV value.

If Kodak does want to put out a firmware update I'd love them to send me
the camera specs, etc that would allow me to make those changes myself.

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Anonymous
March 30, 2005 12:35:03 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

sanjay.bolade@gmail.com wrote:
> Thanks for the reply Ron,
> I haven't tried indoor photography with an external flash till now.

I have tried it with the DX6490 and a cheap bounce flash and the photos are much
nicer than with the on camera flash. So nice that they require very little
retouching, if at all, so the jpeg overcompression is not a problem unless your
print is very large.

--
Ben Thomas
Anonymous
March 30, 2005 2:42:54 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

KennyJr that was an outstanding and very detailed response. Wow!

Top post on this one. I can't cut your work & I hate scrolling to the
bottom of a follow-up only to find an AOL one liner [me too] reply.

This may be of interest:

Cold Snail who also frequents Steve's DigiCams Forums
http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/ put together some excellent Kodak
tips on the Kodak Easysharers Forum at

http://www.myfreebulletinboard.com/f2/1.html

Goto: ... A crash course on Kodak digital cameras ... Tips and tricks
.... PASM modes #'s 1 to 4.

"PASM modes #4 M mode" was so well done and easy to understand how to
shoot in low light situations I ripped a copy into an MsWord doc for
safe keeping.

Hap

On Mon, 28 Mar 2005 12:39:35 -0500, KennyJr
<kennyjr@NOSPAM.floodcity.net> wrote:

>In article <1112023364.749566.16010@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>,
>sanjay.bolade@gmail.com says...
>>
>> Also, is there a detailed guide, which would explain what exactly is
>> the PASM settings. I often end up getting bad shots in this mode.
>>
>
>The PASM mode isn't that hard to understand once you figure it out. PASM
>stands for (P)rogram, (A)perture priority, (S)hutter priority, and (M)
>anual.
>
>In PASM mode you can use the menu to change the ISO setting, white
>balance, color mode, exposure metering, focus zone, and sharpness
>settings of the camera.
>
>Generally I leave ISO set to AUTO because increase ISO also increases
>noise. Your best bet is to use the flash or if your subject is static
>use a tripod. White balance is another setting I ussually leave to AUTO
>unless I see a need to change it. Color mode will be a matter of
>personnal preference. Take a shot of various subjects in each mode and
>see which you like the best.
>
>Changing exposure metering can be very useful under certain conditions.
>For instance if you are shooting a backlit subject you may want to
>switch to spot or center weighted metering to get the best results.
>
>Focus zone like exposure metering could also be useful at times. By
>default the camera uses multizone. If you are having a hard time
>focusing you might try switching it to center zone.
>
>Sharpness is another setting I leave alone. You can get better results
>with a photo editor.
>
>So much for the menu options. You'll find the PASM mode quite useful at
>times.
>
>In (P)rogram mode the camera sets the Aperture and Shutter speed for
>you, but you can change the exposure compensation to lighten or darken
>the image. I find this useful for taking pictures of snow where the
>camera want to make the picture too dark.
>
>In (A)perture priority mode you can change the f-stop and the camera
>sets the Shutter speed. This mode allows you to control the depth of
>field of the shot. A larger aperture (smaller f-stop #) allows a shallow
>depth so that only your subject is in focus, closer further objects are
>blurred. A smaller aperture (larger #) gives you more depth of field and
>allows more of the scene to be in focus. When using this mode keep an
>eye on the shutter speed. If it gets to long you may need a tripod.
>
>In (S)hutter priority mode you set the shutter speed and the camera sets
>the aperture. This is good for action shots where you want to freeze the
>action or night shots where you want a slow shutter speed. If you use a
>slow shutter speed you need a tripod.
>
>In (M)anual mode you control both shutter speed and aperture and the
>camera controls exposure compensation. This bothers me to no end. In my
>opinion the camera should leave the EV at 0 in manual mode. The reason
>you use manual mode is to have full control of the shot.
>
>When using any of the PASM modes if the numbers turn red then your out
>of range of what the camera can adjust to.
>
>If you want a more detailed explanation of any of the menu settings or
>program modes feel free to ask here or to email me.
>
>----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==----
>http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 120,000+ Newsgroups
>----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =----
Anonymous
March 30, 2005 4:55:04 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

KennyJr wrote:

> I have the DX6490 and the high compression normally does present a
> problem, but there are times I'd like to see the ability to save as a
> TIFF file. My other gripe is when in manual mode the camera attemps to
> "correct" your settings by adjusting the EV value.


I don't think it tries to correct anything. It just tells you how under or over
exposed it thinks the photo will be.

--
Ben Thomas
Anonymous
March 30, 2005 4:55:05 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <tn9ph2-uor.ln1@centauri.unico.com.au>, nosp@m.thanks.mate
says...
> KennyJr wrote:
>
> > I have the DX6490 and the high compression normally does present a
> > problem, but there are times I'd like to see the ability to save as a
> > TIFF file. My other gripe is when in manual mode the camera attemps to
> > "correct" your settings by adjusting the EV value.
>
>
> I don't think it tries to correct anything. It just tells you how under or over
> exposed it thinks the photo will be.
>

From page 15 of the manual:

"...You set the aperture and shutter speeds; exposure compensation
changes as a result of those settings. ..."

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Anonymous
March 30, 2005 9:02:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I bookmarked that site to browse later, but I did look at the article
you mentioned. It is very well done. Coming from the days of 35mm I've
used those various modes quite a bit. Of course back then I wasted quite
a bit of film till I learned how to use the camera properly.

That's the great thing about digital cameras. You can shoot as many
pictures as it takes to get used to the camera without the worry of film
cost. For anyone getting a digicam I'd say don't be afraid to play with
the different modes and learning how to use it. Also don't delete the
bad pictures right away. Look at them and the settings used verses the
settings on the pictures that do look good. Also take a look at the
settings the camera uses when your in auto mode.

That's another nice thing about the DX6490. In review mode just push the
toggle up to see the camera settings for any given picture.


In article <n07k415lcnirasgrj35mo7ie0229ii9se9@4ax.com>, hap@lac-du-
possum.ca says...
> KennyJr that was an outstanding and very detailed response. Wow!
>
> Top post on this one. I can't cut your work & I hate scrolling to the
> bottom of a follow-up only to find an AOL one liner [me too] reply.
>
> This may be of interest:
>
> Cold Snail who also frequents Steve's DigiCams Forums
> http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/ put together some excellent Kodak
> tips on the Kodak Easysharers Forum at
>
> http://www.myfreebulletinboard.com/f2/1.html
>
> Goto: ... A crash course on Kodak digital cameras ... Tips and tricks
> ... PASM modes #'s 1 to 4.
>
> "PASM modes #4 M mode" was so well done and easy to understand how to
> shoot in low light situations I ripped a copy into an MsWord doc for
> safe keeping.
>

----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==----
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----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =----
Anonymous
March 31, 2005 2:29:01 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Case for the addition of an additional less compressed jpeg option or the addition of one of the raw formats to turn a very good camera family into a great camera family.

Ron Baird wrote:

> I have not found the compression of the DX6490 to be high or overcompressed?
> Rather, as far I can recall it is about 5:1 normal and a good ratio for a
> general use digital camera.
>
> What are you seeing that leads you to believe the images are over
> compressed?

First it is really nice that Kodak is openly represented in the discussions on this group it has to be a thankless task many times.

The DX6490 and (I have the DX7590) were designed have been positioned to be between many point and shoot camera's and removable lens SLR's. These camera's have many attractive features including long zoom and very long battery life that in part this takes
them away from the "general use digital camera" category. General scenes from the camera are great. When I want detail that is the issue.

What I was first seeing was apparently missing high frequency picture components. We have a few Hairy Woodpeckers around our bird feeders, individuals that we recognize and regularly see from a few feet away, their backs are predominately black with a
white stripe. Both the black and white areas have feather texture and little feathers of the opposite color. Most of this texture lost. The white stripe is typically 60 to 80 pixels wide.

I have been eliminating other causes. My camera platform is a surveyors tripod. I have taken several hundred pictures experimenting with camera settings and techniques.

>
> What are you seeing that leads you to believe the images are over
> compressed

I realized that I saw more feather detail through the electronic eyepiece than was recorded on the woodpecker images suggests that the optics and imager were not the issue.

Many thanks Kodak for your attention to this.

Walter Banks
Anonymous
April 1, 2005 11:50:05 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

KennyJr wrote:
> In article <tn9ph2-uor.ln1@centauri.unico.com.au>, nosp@m.thanks.mate
> says...
>
>>KennyJr wrote:
>>
>>
>>>I have the DX6490 and the high compression normally does present a
>>>problem, but there are times I'd like to see the ability to save as a
>>>TIFF file. My other gripe is when in manual mode the camera attemps to
>>>"correct" your settings by adjusting the EV value.
>>
>>
>>I don't think it tries to correct anything. It just tells you how under or over
>>exposed it thinks the photo will be.
>>
>
>
> From page 15 of the manual:
>
> "...You set the aperture and shutter speeds; exposure compensation
> changes as a result of those settings. ..."

The displayed exposure compensation value changes, but I don't think you'll find
the actual exposure is changed to make the picture look different. If that was
the case, then you would not be able to get over or underexposed pictures when
using the manual mode.

Ben
April 1, 2005 11:50:06 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <4savh2-cf5.ln1@centauri.unico.com.au>, nosp@m.thanks.mate says...
> KennyJr wrote:
> > In article <tn9ph2-uor.ln1@centauri.unico.com.au>, nosp@m.thanks.mate
> > says...
> >
> >>KennyJr wrote:
> >>
> >>
> >>>I have the DX6490 and the high compression normally does present a
> >>>problem, but there are times I'd like to see the ability to save as a
> >>>TIFF file. My other gripe is when in manual mode the camera attemps to
> >>>"correct" your settings by adjusting the EV value.
> >>
> >>
> >>I don't think it tries to correct anything. It just tells you how under or over
> >>exposed it thinks the photo will be.
> >>
> >
> >
> > From page 15 of the manual:
> >
> > "...You set the aperture and shutter speeds; exposure compensation
> > changes as a result of those settings. ..."
>
> The displayed exposure compensation value changes, but I don't think you'll find
> the actual exposure is changed to make the picture look different. If that was
> the case, then you would not be able to get over or underexposed pictures when
> using the manual mode.
>
> Ben
>

Yes, the camera works as you have described here.

If the camera adjusted for the exposure, you would not be able to use an
external flash.

It simply shows the amount by which the shot will be over/under exposed, it
does not make and adjustment




--
Larry Lynch
Mystic, Ct.
Anonymous
April 1, 2005 8:00:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <MPG.1cb6ec5ecb0c0d02989941@news.comcast.giganews.com>,
lastingimagery@comcast.dotnet says...
> In article <4savh2-cf5.ln1@centauri.unico.com.au>, nosp@m.thanks.mate says...
[snip]
> > The displayed exposure compensation value changes, but I don't think you'll find
> > the actual exposure is changed to make the picture look different. If that was
> > the case, then you would not be able to get over or underexposed pictures when
> > using the manual mode.
> >
> > Ben
> >
>
> Yes, the camera works as you have described here.
>
> If the camera adjusted for the exposure, you would not be able to use an
> external flash.
>
> It simply shows the amount by which the shot will be over/under exposed, it
> does not make and adjustment
>

I'm going to experiment with it by under and over exposing a picture by
a stop or two to see what happens and I'll post my findings.

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April 1, 2005 9:34:50 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <MPG.1cb780913bc861b198974a@news.floodcity.net>,
kennyjr@NOSPAM.floodcity.net says...
> I'm going to experiment with it by under and over exposing a picture by
> a stop or two to see what happens and I'll post my findings.
>
>

The - and + numbers are there to let you know what your exposure is, not what
the camera is doing.

Just did it here at the keyboard.

works fine.

If you know how many stops your external flash is worth at a given distance,
those numbers can be a lot of help.


--
Larry Lynch
Mystic, Ct.
Anonymous
April 2, 2005 12:00:01 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <MPG.1cb79696124695ae98994a@news.comcast.giganews.com>,
lastingimagery@comcast.dotnet says...
> In article <MPG.1cb780913bc861b198974a@news.floodcity.net>,
> kennyjr@NOSPAM.floodcity.net says...
> > I'm going to experiment with it by under and over exposing a picture by
> > a stop or two to see what happens and I'll post my findings.
> >
> >
>
> The - and + numbers are there to let you know what your exposure is, not what
> the camera is doing.
>
> Just did it here at the keyboard.
>
> works fine.
>
> If you know how many stops your external flash is worth at a given distance,
> those numbers can be a lot of help.
>

They need to re-write the manual to explain this better. They make it
sound as though the camera is adjusing the EV when in fact it is not.
Playing with verious shutter speeds and apertures showed the the camera
does not adjust the EV and that the EV value diplayed is just there for
guidance.

----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==----
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----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =----
April 2, 2005 12:03:14 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <MPG.1cb7b89dafc8594798974b@news.floodcity.net>,
kennyjr@NOSPAM.floodcity.net says...
> They need to re-write the manual to explain this better. They make it
> sound as though the camera is adjusing the EV when in fact it is not.
> Playing with verious shutter speeds and apertures showed the the camera
> does not adjust the EV and that the EV value diplayed is just there for
> guidance.
>
>

Yes.

As I think I said before, you wouldn't want it to make the adjstment, as that
would fefeat the purpose of using manual in the first place.


--
Larry Lynch
Mystic, Ct.
!