Power Supply Question

Hello everyone,

First time poster, long time reader.

I'm sure this gets asked a lot so sorry in advance :)

I'm planning an upgrade and I need to work out whether I need a new psu or not.

Specs:

Processor:
Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-2500K CPU @ 4.2GHz

Memory:
8GB RAM (2x4GB) Corsair Vengeance DDR3 PC3-12800 (1600)

Hard Drives:
160GB Seagate, 400GB Samsung, 500 GB Seagate (External), 1.5TB Samsung, 2TB Samsung (Unplugged Backup Drive)

Video Card:
ATi HD4850 OC 512MB

Sound Card:
ASUS Xonar D1

Operating System:
Windows 7 Professional x64 SP1

Motherboard:
Asus P8P67 Pro Revision 3

Computer Case:
Aspire X-Plorer ATX Case Silver (External Blue LED's, 2xUV Cathodes, Temperature Monitor, Fan Controller)


and my current PSU is http://www.hardwareheaven.com/reviews/692/pg1/fsp-epsilon-600w-psu-introduction.html

(Had it since 2008)

I would like to upgrade to this - http://www.scan.co.uk/products/2gb-sapphire-hd-6950-dirt3-edition-pci-e-21-%28x16%29-5000mhz-gddr5-gpu-800mhz-1408-cores-hdmi-dp-dvi

I'm quite stuck whether to or not. I read one side then the other all the time.
17 answers Last reply
More about power supply question
  1. Your PSU should handle it HD6950 or not.
  2. Does the fact its nearly 4 years old matter?
  3. To me no, I just assembled with a 4 year old Corsair!
  4. ok fair enough. What amount would it draw then do you think?
  5. Single HD6950 total system load according to this around 300watts http://www.anandtech.com/show/4061/amds-radeon-hd-6970-radeon-hd-6950/24
  6. hm ok. Is it safe if there are problems? like would it damage components or? I guess if it powers off randomly (not a power cut) best to get higher wattage?
  7. You can determine precisely what power is required for your current or future PC in both watts and 12v rail amps from the link below. Yes a PSU that is four years old could show a loss in total capacity with capacitor aging. The info. at the link below is objective and accurate and will tell you if your current PSU is satisfactory or not and if not what PSUs will serve you well. No guessing required!

    http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/314712-28-please-read-determine-power-required
  8. I totally agree with beenthere - capacitors in switching power supplies are some of the most stressed components. If I were putting a substantial amount of money into a new build - I would also get a new quality PSU.
    -Bruce
  9. The age of my current was the concern, I was looking at this - http://www.scan.co.uk/products/750w-psu-antec-truepower-new-tp-750-blue-modular-82-eff-80-plus-bronze-sli-crossfire-eps-12v-quiet-f

    Plus this is modular aswell.

    Thoughts?
  10. crazymaniac90 said:
    hm ok. Is it safe if there are problems? like would it damage components or? I guess if it powers off randomly (not a power cut) best to get higher wattage?

    I agree with rolli59's recommendations. Stay with your current PSU.

    As with all components, electrical, mechanical, or otherwise. sooner or later they will fail. When that day comes, you can consider buying a new PSU 650 watts or higher. Until that day, your present PSU will serve you well.

    If you have to have a new one, consider a modular PSU such as these:
    Corsair HX650 - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139012
    Corsair HX750 - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139010

    Other good brands are Seasonic and Antec among others.
  11. Originally I was never going to but I was worried that it could damage parts (which I have experienced in the past). If it starts to fail, shut down - new buy? could failure cause damage?
  12. Yes, which is why some of us said to go new. It may last for another 4 years - are you willing to bet your mobo/cpu? Many times a PSU will die gracefully - I've also seen it take out almost everything in the case.
    -Bruce
  13. See, always two sides hehe.

    Thanks for everyones input, for the sake of risk which I was concerned about, ill consider a new one.
  14. crazymaniac90 said:
    Originally I was never going to but I was worried that it could damage parts (which I have experienced in the past). If it starts to fail, shut down - new buy? could failure cause damage?

    No point in living with the sword of Damocles!

    In this case, go ahead and get the Corsair. If you have future plans of SLI, go with the Corsair HX750; if not, the HX650 will suffice.
  15. crazymaniac90 said:
    Originally I was never going to but I was worried that it could damage parts (which I have experienced in the past). If it starts to fail, shut down - new buy? could failure cause damage?

    It is all based on the quality of the unit, yours has good safeties in place "Full Range Input with Complete Protection (OVP;OCP;SCP)" which is the reason to buy a quality PSU in the first place so if problems then only the PSU that gets affected.
  16. Just looking at two Corsair PSUs and for the very similar price whats the different apart from the wattage?

    650W

    http://www.scan.co.uk/products/650w-psu-corsair-hx-cmpsu-650hxuk-modular-85eff-80-plus-bronze-sli-crossfire-eps-12v-quiet-fan-atx-v - £95.58


    750W

    http://www.scan.co.uk/products/750w-psu-corsair-enthusiast-series-tx750m-modular-85-eff-80-plus-bronze-sli-crossfire-eps-12v-quiet- - £95.70


    Looking at the specs myself, the 750W is slightly better than the 650W so why the prices so similar?

    Edit: All I can see is that the 650W has one more SATA power and is 52 A on the +12V Rail, the 750W as one less SATA and is 62 A on the +12V Rail..


    I've just realised that the 750W isnt as modular as the 650W

    650W then?
  17. The 650 you picked is Modular - the 750 is not Modular. Apart from the amps at the 12 volt rails.
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