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What is a BIOS?

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July 19, 2012 5:18:08 PM

What is BIOS i read up on the mother board i wanted to get but i still have no real idea of how to download BIOS or Even where to get it and even how to install it???
If i am wrong in anyways correct me please.

The motherboard i am looking into is a
ASUS P8Z68 DELUXE/GEN3 LGA 1155 Intel Z68 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard with UEFI BIOS
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

along with a
Intel Core i7-2600 Sandy Bridge 3.4GHz (3.8GHz Turbo Boost) LGA 1155 95W Quad-Core Desktop Processor Intel HD Graphics 2000 BX80623I72600
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I'm really curious about BIOS and how it will affect the performance and working procedures of the computer itself.
I know that it stands for this Basic Input Output System and I know some things about it but I would like more details on it
Thanks!

More about : bios

a b V Motherboard
July 19, 2012 5:52:18 PM

The BIOS is kind of the lowest level part of a computer that manages all the connections between hardware components. It is primarily responsible for initializing the hardware at boot and running the Power On Self-Tests (POST) to do some basic checks of the hardware to make sure it's up and running properly. It's job is then the pass things over to the OS bootloader.

Once the OS loads however, the BIOS is largely bypassed for performance reasons. So as soon as you see the Windows splash screen, the BIOS pretty much stops being relevant.

UEFI is basically a BIOS replacement. Apple has been using it since they shifted to Intel CPUs about 6 years ago. It's developed by Intel, and the basic idea behind a firmware over a BIOS is to kind of streamline the boot process. Run a few quick initialization tests of the hardware, but not really bothering with some of the low level configuration tweaks that have made their way into the BIOS. Just initialize the hardware and get out of the way for the OS.

All most people really need to know is that UEFI is an eventual BIOS replacement, and that this is a good thing. The BIOS is old, slow, clunky, and needlessly complicated. It was designed for computers way back in the 1980s, and has never really been properly updated to reflect the numerous changes that have happened since then.

Beyond that, generally speaking the only time I (and many others) would recommend updating your BIOS is if the new version resolves some issue you are having or adds some new functionality that you would be interested in taking advantage of.
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July 19, 2012 7:06:48 PM

cl-scott said:
The BIOS is kind of the lowest level part of a computer that manages all the connections between hardware components. It is primarily responsible for initializing the hardware at boot and running the Power On Self-Tests (POST) to do some basic checks of the hardware to make sure it's up and running properly. It's job is then the pass things over to the OS bootloader.

Once the OS loads however, the BIOS is largely bypassed for performance reasons. So as soon as you see the Windows splash screen, the BIOS pretty much stops being relevant.

UEFI is basically a BIOS replacement. Apple has been using it since they shifted to Intel CPUs about 6 years ago. It's developed by Intel, and the basic idea behind a firmware over a BIOS is to kind of streamline the boot process. Run a few quick initialization tests of the hardware, but not really bothering with some of the low level configuration tweaks that have made their way into the BIOS. Just initialize the hardware and get out of the way for the OS.

All most people really need to know is that UEFI is an eventual BIOS replacement, and that this is a good thing. The BIOS is old, slow, clunky, and needlessly complicated. It was designed for computers way back in the 1980s, and has never really been properly updated to reflect the numerous changes that have happened since then.

Beyond that, generally speaking the only time I (and many others) would recommend updating your BIOS is if the new version resolves some issue you are having or adds some new functionality that you would be interested in taking advantage of.


So when i build a new computer it means i dont have to update the BIOS for a new CPU?
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a b å Intel
a b V Motherboard
July 20, 2012 10:32:18 AM

its always advisable to update BIOS because like a huge OS, it too is a code. and like any program, it may have bugs too. since BIOS initializes the peripheral components and loads the OS, a bug at this level may cause boot up or peripheral issues.

One example is AMD's suggestion you update your BIOS as one possible way of addressing its "graphic card display driver crashed and recovered" issue
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a c 328 V Motherboard
July 20, 2012 10:45:43 AM

Examples when to flash the BIOS usually are:

1. New CPU was released
2. Memory compatibility issues + new RAM models are released
3. Remember when the new 2+TB HDD have been released? New BIOS was needed.
4. New hardware support added.
5. Or if u can benefit from changes in the change log.

BIOS updates are always risky for various reasons.
Especially when wrong BIOS is used.
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a c 328 V Motherboard
July 20, 2012 10:50:34 AM

Bloodchain said:
What is BIOS i read up on the mother board i wanted to get but i still have no real idea of how to download BIOS or Even where to get it and even how to install it???
If i am wrong in anyways correct me please.

The motherboard i am looking into is a
ASUS P8Z68 DELUXE/GEN3 LGA 1155 Intel Z68 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard with UEFI BIOS
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

along with a
Intel Core i7-2600 Sandy Bridge 3.4GHz (3.8GHz Turbo Boost) LGA 1155 95W Quad-Core Desktop Processor Intel HD Graphics 2000 BX80623I72600
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I'm really curious about BIOS and how it will affect the performance and working procedures of the computer itself.
I know that it stands for this Basic Input Output System and I know some things about it but I would like more details on it
Thanks!

With that mobo, u don't really need to upgrade the BIOS at all.

The CPU is great mach. If u would have the newer, Ivy Bridge CPU and that mobo, u would have to upgrade because the CPU was released way later, after the mobo launch.

U are good to go.
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July 20, 2012 5:09:15 PM

nikorr said:
With that mobo, u don't really need to upgrade the BIOS at all.

The CPU is great mach. If u would have the newer, Ivy Bridge CPU and that mobo, u would have to upgrade because the CPU was released way later, after the mobo launch.

U are good to go.


I thank you very much for all your help guys it has helped me a lot time to order me a new computer! thanks!

Also what about the GPU and the RAM would i need to update the BIOS if they dont work?

RAM
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

GPU
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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a c 328 V Motherboard
July 20, 2012 9:14:23 PM

No problem here, its mostly when new product standards are available. Than it might need the flash.

But this RAM is older one and works just fine. And I am 99% sure that card is fine too.



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July 20, 2012 10:24:33 PM

nikorr said:
No problem here, its mostly when new product standards are available. Than it might need the flash.

But this RAM is older one and works just fine. And I am 99% sure that card is fine too.


Alright
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a c 328 V Motherboard
July 20, 2012 10:28:54 PM

Cool.
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