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What is the difference between ftp cable and utp cable?

Hello,
what is the difference between ftp cable and utp cable?
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More about what difference cable cable
  1. No such thing as either cable, those are network protocols.
  2. almost all network cables are UTP ( Unshielded Twisted Pair) cables.

    FTP (File Transfer Protocol) is an internet protocol that is used to transmit a file from a FTP server to a computer.
  3. UTP and STP.

    STP is shielded twisted pair. This is commonly used in Europe to shield from EMI (Electromagnetic interference) due to the use of 220v compared to North America's 110v.
  4. oops I was thinking ftp and UDP. Dang these similar tech names.
  5. UTP is cheaper than STP.

    I thought I'd give my 2cents worth as well :P
  6. UTP for Unshielded Twisted Pair
    STP for Shielded Twisted Pair
    FTP for Foiled Twisted Pair


    UTP cable has no shielding, only an insulation around the cables
    STP cable has a metal shield around each twisted pair, all pairs together are in the cable covered by insulation
    FTP cable has a metal shield around all pairs - "the cable"- together

    by Rajeesh Dubai
  7. Emerald said:
    almost all network cables are UTP ( Unshielded Twisted Pair) cables.

    FTP (File Transfer Protocol) is an internet protocol that is used to transmit a file from a FTP server to a computer.


    If you don’t know why you are answering this blenders
  8. FTP/UTP... Will it blend? :lol:

    No one has explained UDP yet so I'll inject my two cents.

    UDP is a networking protocol whereby data is sent to a client without any confirmation that the content arrived (nor that it was in order when it did). UDP is useful because, in applications that don't demand that sort of confirmation, it can save network bandwidth and utilize it instead to lower latency and increase throughput. This is something that you would use for applications such as streaming video, VoIP, etc where a loss of some data is acceptable and will not affect the end result that much.

    TCP is a networking protocol where data is sent to a client with a confirmation that all packets have arrived and that they are in order (this is a little bit incorrect but it will suffice for this lesson ;) ). TCP is generally used for applications where all of the data sent needs to be replicated exactly, such as a file transfer or website load. FTP generally uses TCP to ensure that files are transferred completely and successfully.

    FTP (as explained previously) is a file transfer protocol between computers. My question is this, if you're asking what FTP and UDP are together, are you trying to use FTP via a UDP stream? This might work, but IMO it's a bad idea. Stick with TCP if that's in fact what's going on. :)
  9. Psychoteddy said:
    FTP/UTP... Will it blend? :lol:

    No one has explained UDP yet so I'll inject my two cents.

    UDP is a networking protocol whereby data is sent to a client without any confirmation that the content arrived (nor that it was in order when it did). UDP is useful because, in applications that don't demand that sort of confirmation, it can save network bandwidth and utilize it instead to lower latency and increase throughput. This is something that you would use for applications such as streaming video, VoIP, etc where a loss of some data is acceptable and will not affect the end result that much.

    TCP is a networking protocol where data is sent to a client with a confirmation that all packets have arrived and that they are in order (this is a little bit incorrect but it will suffice for this lesson ;) ). TCP is generally used for applications where all of the data sent needs to be replicated exactly, such as a file transfer or website load. FTP generally uses TCP to ensure that files are transferred completely and successfully.

    FTP (as explained previously) is a file transfer protocol between computers. My question is this, if you're asking what FTP and UDP are together, are you trying to use FTP via a UDP stream? This might work, but IMO it's a bad idea. Stick with TCP if that's in fact what's going on. :)



    Dear friend please try to understand the question see above (what is the diffreds between UTP and FTP cable not for "UDP")

    this is not a protocol this is cat-6 or cat-7 cable refrence
    check my explanations
  10. rajeesh said:
    Dear friend please try to understand the question see above (what is the diffreds between UTP and FTP cable not for "UDP")

    this is not a protocol this is cat-6 or cat-7 cable refrence
    check my explanations


    FTP is not a cable anything, if you are talking about an FTP cable you are mistaken in what you are looking for info on. You can use any cable to transmit FTP. If you read all of the posts above you should see that.
  11. rajeesh said:
    Dear friend please try to understand the question see above (what is the diffreds between UTP and FTP cable not for "UDP")

    this is not a protocol this is cat-6 or cat-7 cable refrence
    check my explanations


    There are only two types of standard (ethernet) networking cable in use today, STP and UTP. What I was explaining to the OP was the difference in protocols on the off chance that he was talking about protocols and not cabling.

    FTP being a protocol, and UTP being similar to UDP, I thought that he might be talking about the protocols...
  12. riser said:
    UTP and STP.

    STP is shielded twisted pair. This is commonly used in Europe to shield from EMI (Electromagnetic interference) due to the use of 220v compared to North America's 110v.


    STP is shielded yes. But not particularly related to higher mains ac voltage in Europe ( btw the standard is 230V ac rms but tolerance is -6% / +10% thus the 220V used in many countries is within tolerance as is 240V as used in UK )
    for info :

    Note: * Member countries of the European Union are presently striving to achieve a common mains standard.
    From 1 January 2004 the mains supply should be 230V (-6%, +10%), 50 Hz (±1%). ie a range of 216.2 - 253V
    This replaces the UK's former specification which was 240V ±6% (ie a range of 225.6 - 254.4V)
    Variations should still be anticipated in some areas as the voltage will drop during periods of heavy demand and rise during periods of low demand.

    Higher mains voltage does not lead directly to more rf / emi issues. Arguably less as current is reduced. But the rf frequencies at which shielding is effective are emissions from the network cable or external interference from other elctronic devices - computers / mobile phones / etc which may or may not runn from mains but are not operating at mains frequencies in any case. Typically the switch mode power supply is a major cause of emissions.

    btw FTP cable is Foil Twisted Pair. Not as effective as a braid but more flexible and connector friendly.
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