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Help! How to connect tv to net using wireless then wired?

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  • Wireless
  • Networking
  • Product
Last response: in Networking
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September 24, 2010 9:24:28 PM

Hello, We just purchased a Sammy Pn58c8000 plasma that supports netflix, vudu, streaming movies and such. The plasma is at one end of the house. The other end is where we have the router/modem/computer set up. I dont want to buy a $80 wireless adapter for the plasma then one for the blu-ray.

So how do I send a wireless signal to the area by the plasma, then hardwire it up to the set and blu-ray? Do I need to buy a wireless acess point then a switch? Please help, I am so lost.

I have a D-link DIR-655


Thanks,
Michael

More about : connect net wireless wired

a b F Wireless
September 24, 2010 10:13:22 PM

What you need is called a "wireless ethernet bridge". They come in various forms. Some are standalone devices but tend to be quite expensive. Some routers can be *reconfigured* as a wireless ethernet bridge as well. Routers w/ this capability are particularly favored since they tend to be much cheaper (at least if you know what to buy and when to buy it, iow, find a deal), and have the bonus of an integrated switch to support multiple wired devices.

So how does it work? The wireless ethernet bridge acts as a wireless client to your wireless router. Wired clients behind the bridge thus have wireless access from the point of the bridge to the wireless router.

[wireless router]<-- wireless -->[wireless ethernet bridge]<-- wire -->[tv, blu-ray, xbox, tivo, etc.]

Much simpler, less costly, and easier to manage than buying one wireless adapter after another every time you add network devices, assuming all those devices are located in the same general vicinity.
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September 24, 2010 10:38:20 PM

eibgrad said:
What you need is called a "wireless ethernet bridge". They come in various forms. Some are standalone devices but tend to be quite expensive. Some routers can be *reconfigured* as a wireless ethernet bridge as well. Routers w/ this capability are particularly favored since they tend to be much cheaper (at least if you know what to buy and when to buy it, iow, find a deal), and have the bonus of an integrated switch to support multiple wired devices.

So how does it work? The wireless ethernet bridge acts as a wireless client to your wireless router. Wired clients behind the bridge thus have wireless access from the point of the bridge to the wireless router.

[wireless router]<-- wireless -->[wireless ethernet bridge]<-- wire -->[tv, blu-ray, xbox, tivo, etc.]

Much simpler, less costly, and easier to manage than buying one wireless adapter after another every time you add network devices, assuming all those devices are located in the same general vicinity.



Thanks,

Is there a specific router I should look for? I saw something about finding a "wrt"?

I have a $100 gift card coming through the egg in a few weeks from a previous purchase. It doesn't mean I need to spend all the $100 but if you could point me in the direction of one and I can probably go from there in researching it a little more.
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Best solution

a b F Wireless
September 24, 2010 11:56:49 PM

By "wrt", I assume you mean either dd-wrt or openwrt (third party firmware) compatible. That's always been my favorite solution. However, I’m always a wee bit reluctant to recommend such routers to ppl since it involves changing the firmware (which brings w/ it some risk) and perhaps more complexity than the average user is willing/able to absorb. I just never know if I'm dealing w/ a total newbie, or highly experienced user.

If you’re willing to consider dd-wrt (or tomato, another third party option), it will run you about ~$30-33 (probably w/ a rebate). I don’t know whether you need wireless G or N, but my current favorite wireless G dd-wrt/tomato compatible routers are the ASUS WL-520GU and ASUS WL-500GP V2.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
http://www.mwave.com/mwave/skusearch_v3.asp?scriteria=A...

The WL-500GP V2 is actually the better deal, not just because it’s cheaper, but it’s really the WL-520GU on steroids. You rarely see the WL-500GP V2 below $50, even w/ the best deals, so $30 AR is excellent. And again, you can use either dd-wrt or tomato firmware. And ASUS routers are much harder to accidentally brick since they employ a special recovery mode for firmware installation (oem or third party). These routers even include USB ports so you could use them w/ external storage and/or for print serving. But again, these are wireless G. If it matters, I own one of each.

If you need wireless N, although I don’t own one myself, I’d have heard some good things about the ASUS RT-N12 w/ dd-wrt/tomato. Just like the other ASUS routers, it uses a special recovery mode for firmware updates. Best price I seeing now is ~$40, but it has been as low as ~$30 several times over the past few months, which is a really good price for a wireless N router w/ third party firmware support.

If you want a device that support wireless ethernet bridging w/ the native (oem) firmware, there are a few options as well.

http://www.amazon.com/ZyXEL-P330W-802-11g-Wireless-Rout...
http://www.amazon.com/ZyXEL-WAP3205-Wireless-Access-Eth...

I don’t necessarily consider these great values, or something I personally would buy, but for someone who just doesn’t want to mess w/ third party firmware (either installation or configuration), feels intimated by the process, etc., at least it’s an option.

Finally I have one remaining option if you’re feeling particularly adventuresome. Verizon is currently selling the Westell 7501 wireless router for $10 shipped! It’s nothing fancy, but it does the job. But what not everyone realizes it that it can be “hacked” into a wireless ethernet bridge. I’m using one right now to support a Linux PC.

http://slickdeals.net/forums/showthread.php?sduid=25485...

A helluva deal if you’re interested in saving a lot of money, but again, you will have to get into a little bit of hacking (strictly software changes, involves no hardware changes, not even firmware changes, so perfectly safe). Probably not the right solution for most ppl but I thought I’d mention it, just in case you might be interested.





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September 25, 2010 12:11:33 AM

Oh wow, Thanks for the info. I know my way around computers and such but when it comes to networks I am rather noobish. I will look into the Asus N router as its supposed to be better at streaming HD (or so I have read). I also like that Asus makes it a little less intimidating by having a recovery, sort of like there mobo's. I have heard of tomato and will look into that now. Thanks for pushing me into a direction.

Thanks!!
Michael
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September 25, 2010 1:10:25 PM

Best answer selected by streetmike.
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March 6, 2012 9:43:44 PM

Hello,

The best way to connect your TV to the wireless network is via a WiFi repeater as is sold in the store Pixinf.

This device lets you connect your TV to the wireless network anywhere on the home and increases the signal range of existing wireless network. Works for me perfectly and also use to connect the PS2 to the Internet.

Here is the link:
http://www.pixinf.com/en/wireless/420-wireless-repeater...


Greetings
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