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Shrinking size for upload???

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Anonymous
March 18, 2005 2:06:24 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I want to upload a large number of photos for printing (photobox). They are
3008*2000 and around 8MB a piece as given to me. I would like to shrink them
to around 20% that filesize.

What is the best algorithm to do this.

I did a batch using the default setting 15% compression in Print Shop Pro
(standard encoding, YCbCr x1x1x1) which are adequate but I am guessing
someone here will be able tosuggest a better setting.

Time issues mean no time for testing lots of settings or other products
myself. I need to calibrate my monitor too etc..

Hope you can help by suggesting a utility or some settings.

More about : shrinking size upload

Anonymous
March 18, 2005 2:06:25 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

BigBird commented courteously...

> I did a batch using the default setting 15% compression
> in Print Shop Pro (standard encoding, YCbCr x1x1x1)
> which are adequate but I am guessing someone here will
> be able to suggest a better setting.

Perhaps try 2x2 1x1 1x1 Chroma Subsampling. It usually
yields a 10-15% reduction in file size for me. Be sure to
run some tests, though, as the 1x1 that you're using will
give you the highest quality results.

--
ATM, aka Jerry
Anonymous
March 18, 2005 2:06:25 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Most likely the printing will be done at 300 dpi so sending a photo has
higher resolution then that wont help, so you could resize them photos
to 1200 x 1800, this would be just for the 4 x 6 prints. At that size
you could save then in pretty high quality and they would still be much
smaller.

Scott
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Anonymous
March 18, 2005 2:06:25 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Fri, 18 Mar 2005 11:06:24 -0000, BigBird wrote:

> I want to upload a large number of photos for printing (photobox). They are
> 3008*2000 and around 8MB a piece as given to me. I would like to shrink them
> to around 20% that filesize.

> Hope you can help by suggesting a utility or some settings.

JpegSizer will do this job very effectively, and lets you specify the file
size you want (rather than the JPEG compression level). Free trial at link
below.

HTH

Peter

--
Versatile image resizer for web sites and email attachments
http://jpegsizer.tangotools.com
Anonymous
March 18, 2005 2:06:25 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Dr. Joel M. Hoffman wrote:
> >Okay I went for a 60% resize (smart resize) and 5% compression
(standard
> >encoding).
> >
> >2.6GB down to 392MB
>
> Unless you have to, don't use JPEG compression. Find out what
> resolution your pictures are being printed at (probably 300dpi or
> 200dpi), and then send in a file that matches. For example, at
> 300dpi, you'll need:
>
> 4" x 300dpi = 1200
> 6" x 300dpi = 1800
>
> so anything over 1200x1800 won't help at all. That's only 2MB. A
> 392MB file is crazy for a 4x6 print.
>
> -Joel
>
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Free 35mm lens/digicam reviews: http://www.exc.com/photography
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------------

jpeg files should not be a problem at all when printing, as long as the
compression is not set way to high. IMO it would be rather silly to
upload tiff files.
Anonymous
March 18, 2005 2:28:24 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

BigBird <bigbird@int.net> wrote:
> I want to upload a large number of photos for printing (photobox). They are
> 3008*2000 and around 8MB a piece as given to me. I would like to shrink them
> to around 20% that filesize.
>
> What is the best algorithm to do this.

For a start, What size prints do you want to buy?

pete
--
pete@fenelon.com "Send lawyers, guns and money...."
Anonymous
March 18, 2005 4:36:31 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Pete Fenelon" <pete@fenelon.com> wrote in message
news:o 0ee1d.ngs.ln@fenelon.com...
> BigBird <bigbird@int.net> wrote:
>> I want to upload a large number of photos for printing (photobox). They
>> are
>> 3008*2000 and around 8MB a piece as given to me. I would like to shrink
>> them
>> to around 20% that filesize.
>>
>> What is the best algorithm to do this.
>
> For a start, What size prints do you want to buy?
>

In the first instance these are for 6*4s.
Anonymous
March 18, 2005 6:56:43 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Scott W" <biphoto@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1111155127.310669.188880@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
> Most likely the printing will be done at 300 dpi so sending a photo has
> higher resolution then that wont help, so you could resize them photos
> to 1200 x 1800, this would be just for the 4 x 6 prints. At that size
> you could save then in pretty high quality and they would still be much
> smaller.
>
>

Okay I went for a 60% resize (smart resize) and 5% compression (standard
encoding).

2.6GB down to 392MB

Thanks for your help.
Anonymous
March 18, 2005 6:56:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Dr. Joel M. Hoffman wrote:
> >jpeg files should not be a problem at all when printing, as long as
the
> >compression is not set way to high. IMO it would be rather silly to
> >upload tiff files.
>
> That's not been my experience. Some photos don't suffer from JPEG
> compression, but some images suffer terribly. Try taking a picture
of
> bare trees in the winter against a light blue or white sky
background.
> Print the TIFF and the JPEG - you'll see an enormous difference.
>
> -Joel
>
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Free 35mm lens/digicam reviews: http://www.exc.com/photography
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------------

If you would like to post a link to a small tiff I would be more then
happy to convert it into a jpeg and have you tell me you can tell the
difference.

If you would like you can email it to me at biphoto@hotmail.com, say a
100 x 100 tiff, I will then make it into a jpeg and post a link to both
your tiff and the jpeg.

jpegs are only a problem when printed if you compress too much, easy to
avoid.

Scott
Anonymous
March 18, 2005 7:22:17 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

>Okay I went for a 60% resize (smart resize) and 5% compression (standard
>encoding).
>
>2.6GB down to 392MB

Unless you have to, don't use JPEG compression. Find out what
resolution your pictures are being printed at (probably 300dpi or
200dpi), and then send in a file that matches. For example, at
300dpi, you'll need:

4" x 300dpi = 1200
6" x 300dpi = 1800

so anything over 1200x1800 won't help at all. That's only 2MB. A
392MB file is crazy for a 4x6 print.

-Joel

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Free 35mm lens/digicam reviews: http://www.exc.com/photography
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Anonymous
March 18, 2005 8:38:19 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"BigBird" <bigbird@int.net> wrote in message
news:39vr1hF655n9oU1@individual.net...
>I want to upload a large number of photos for printing (photobox). They are
>3008*2000 and around 8MB a piece as given to me. I would like to shrink
>them to around 20% that filesize.
>
> What is the best algorithm to do this.
>
> I did a batch using the default setting 15% compression in Print Shop Pro
> (standard encoding, YCbCr x1x1x1) which are adequate but I am guessing
> someone here will be able tosuggest a better setting.
>
> Time issues mean no time for testing lots of settings or other products
> myself. I need to calibrate my monitor too etc..
>
> Hope you can help by suggesting a utility or some settings.
>
>
>
Use the pixel size recommended for the size of Print required, as you are
going to use Photobox, they provide the information on this page.

http://www.photobox.co.uk/quality.html#resolution

Regards Mick
Anonymous
March 18, 2005 8:48:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

>jpeg files should not be a problem at all when printing, as long as the
>compression is not set way to high. IMO it would be rather silly to
>upload tiff files.

That's not been my experience. Some photos don't suffer from JPEG
compression, but some images suffer terribly. Try taking a picture of
bare trees in the winter against a light blue or white sky background.
Print the TIFF and the JPEG - you'll see an enormous difference.

-Joel

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Free 35mm lens/digicam reviews: http://www.exc.com/photography
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Anonymous
March 18, 2005 9:03:26 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

BigBird <bigbird@int.net> wrote:
>>> 3008*2000 and around 8MB a piece as given to me. I would like to shrink
>>> them
>>> to around 20% that filesize.
>>>
>>> What is the best algorithm to do this.
>>
>> For a start, What size prints do you want to buy?
>>
>
> In the first instance these are for 6*4s.
>

Assuming 300dpi, you could resample down to about 1800x1200, which would
probably give you a reduction of about 60% in filesize. Gets you a long
way towards your target.

pete
--
pete@fenelon.com "Send lawyers, guns and money...."
Anonymous
March 19, 2005 1:09:25 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Dr. Joel M. Hoffman" <joel@exc.com> wrote in message
news:ZeD_d.19560$DU2.18972@fe12.lga...
> >Okay I went for a 60% resize (smart resize) and 5% compression (standard
>>encoding).
>>
>>2.6GB down to 392MB
>
> Unless you have to, don't use JPEG compression. Find out what
> resolution your pictures are being printed at (probably 300dpi or
> 200dpi), and then send in a file that matches. For example, at
> 300dpi, you'll need:
>
> 4" x 300dpi = 1200
> 6" x 300dpi = 1800
>

Did you read the thread? Why have you simply snipped and plagarising Scotts
advice that I have already taken.

> so anything over 1200x1800 won't help at all. That's only 2MB. A
> 392MB file is crazy for a 4x6 print.
>

Now I know your just being daft...

....make a note to yourself to read the thread in future.

Thanks anyway.
March 19, 2005 5:13:48 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Scott W wrote:


>
> jpegs are only a problem when printed if you compress too much, easy to
> avoid.
>


Exactly. And the other problem could be reopening a jpeg and then
recompressing it. I have never seen light compression jpegs issues on
300DPI files printed.

--

Stacey
!