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Removed CPU Fan. Need thermal paste?

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October 27, 2011 1:42:39 AM

I bought a new pc a few months ago. I am planning on taking it apart but was doing some testing and removed the CPU fan for the first time. As it is relatively new (5 months use), I am wondering if I now need to add some thermal paste?

If so what is the best way to do this? Should I add some to the CPU fan as well as the CPU itself?

The CPU fan is Intel so I guess this was installed with its own thermal paste.
October 27, 2011 1:48:06 AM

you'll have to (thoroughly) clean both the cpu and cooler of the old stuff then put a SMALL blob (no more than 5mm in diameter) in the center of the cpu (arctic silver 5 is very good) and the pressure of the cooler will spread the tim out...
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October 27, 2011 1:50:05 AM

meridius10 said:
I bought a new pc a few months ago. I am planning on taking it apart but was doing some testing and removed the CPU fan for the first time. As it is relatively new (5 months use), I am wondering if I now need to add some thermal paste?

If so what is the best way to do this? Should I add some to the CPU fan as well as the CPU itself?

The CPU fan is Intel so I guess this was installed with its own thermal paste.


Usually when I'm reapplying thermal paste, I take a qtip dipped in 90%+ Isopropyl alcohol and wipe the surface of the processor and cpu fan clean of the old thermalpaste, making sure of course none of the Isopropyl gets near the motherboard or processor pins. Using a dry qtip to wipe up afterwords. Depends who you ask about where to put the thermal paste, but I prefer a very thin layer (no more than an uncooked pea sized amount spread across thin) on the cpu fan itself.

Be cautious with the pushpins if your not use to them. Make sure the cpu fan is making even contact with cpu. Me and pushpins never get along, so I use bracket style fans. Bigger pain to work with since any time I have to remove cpu fan I have to remove the motherboard, but it guarantees contact for me. Ex: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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October 27, 2011 1:55:56 AM

cpatel1987..

You're the first person I've seen who has a preference for coating the cooler. :) 
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October 27, 2011 1:59:33 AM

Scuttlebug said:
cpatel1987..

You're the first person I've seen who has a preference for coating the cooler. :) 


@scuttlebug: Lol really? Well my logic behind that is I don't have to worry about putting too much or too little. CPU fan surface=defined limit for me.
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October 27, 2011 2:01:33 AM

cpatel1987 said:
@scuttlebug: Lol really? Well my logic behind that is I don't have to worry about putting too much or too little. CPU fan surface=defined limit for me.


That, admittedly, is the drawback of coating the cpu.. if you are messy you can royally screw the pooch.
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October 27, 2011 7:04:42 AM

cpatel1987 said:
Usually when I'm reapplying thermal paste, I take a qtip dipped in 90%+ Isopropyl alcohol and wipe the surface of the processor and cpu fan clean of the old thermalpaste, making sure of course none of the Isopropyl gets near the motherboard or processor pins. Using a dry qtip to wipe up afterwords. Depends who you ask about where to put the thermal paste, but I prefer a very thin layer (no more than an uncooked pea sized amount spread across thin) on the cpu fan itself.

Be cautious with the pushpins if your not use to them. Make sure the cpu fan is making even contact with cpu. Me and pushpins never get along, so I use bracket style fans. Bigger pain to work with since any time I have to remove cpu fan I have to remove the motherboard, but it guarantees contact for me. Ex: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


Thanks - I was really struggling with those pushpins last night, but finally managed to remove the cpu fan.
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October 28, 2011 8:51:50 AM

Best answer selected by meridius10.
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