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Nintendo cock-teases BS about Revolution

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August 18, 2005 1:15:04 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.game-boy,alt.games.video.nintendo.gameboy.advance,alt.games.video.nintendo.gamecube,rec.games.video.nintendo,uk.video.games.gamecube (More info?)

http://cube.ign.com/articles/642/642885p1.html

GC 2005: Revolution Teasing Continues
More on its mystery, wi-fi, and, well, the elderly.
by Fran Mirabella III
August 17, 2005 - Nintendo's GC 2005 press conference entitled "Expand the
Definition of Gaming" opened with a teaser trailer that cited its past home
console accomplishments. The trailer flashed a series of slogan-esque claims
that went as follows: "expanding the definition of mobile gaming" with the
Game Boy, "power" with the SNES, "possibilities" with the N64, "gaming
experience" with the N64 rumble pack, "gameplay" with the GameCube,
"wireless" with the Wave Bird, "functionality" with the GBA, and "how to
play games" with the DS. It ended with a question, "So what exactly is the
definition of gaming?"



The answer, "Please don't ask us. Because we will always expand the
definition of gaming." Finally Revolution appeared with only the numbers
2006 -- its release year -- painted over it.

Bernd Fakesch, spokesman and General Manager of Nintendo of Europe, opened
with a speech that highlighted the company's commitment to innovating with
games. Much like with the Revolution's unveiling at E3 this year, the
enthusiasm for wi-fi gaming possibilities was echoed here too.

Fakesch said, "In the console market, beginning in 2006 our wi-fi capable
flagship Revolution will set new landmarks. By 'expanding the definition of
gaming' we don't only mean an advance towards new limits of gaming, but also
to new potential players. We want to win over new people and inspire them,
those who have never thought about taking a controller into their hands --
more girls, young women, adults, and also elderly players. Certainly in the
process we won't neglect the fan community. Germany needs new kinds of games
and Nintendo is certainly the company that is best-suited to supply them. We
hold a unique position in the market. We are among the worldwide leading
hardware manufacturers and at the same time we are among the leading
software developers. And that's both for handhelds and home consoles.
Additionally, we have decades of experience where we have focused our entire
know-how on the content of games and gaming fun."

He finally added, "What are the new games of the future really going to look
like? The titles of our innovative Nintendo DS give an idea of this."

What we discerned from this is that, indeed, the company wants to continue
to offer fresh gaming experiences, much of which will involve wi-fi play
but, additionally, gaming for really old people. This, admittedly, perplexes
us. The elderly can, at times, barely feed themselves and this isn't the
kind of gaming most, let's say, Smash Bros. or Zelda fans would really want.
So, we are certainly very interested to see what Revolution has in store to
provide such a wide range of gaming.


Later during the conference Nintendo brought up Revolution again, noting
that it will be the next big thing and, again, very much wi-fi enabled. It
seems the company can't not talk about wi-fi now that it's got the ball
rolling. Interestingly, Fakesch said Revolution will have "a large number of
novelties." The "novelties" translation, we speculate, may have actually
referred to add-on services or peripherals. When asked for more information,
he said, "The only thing I can tell you is that very soon there will be
important news about Revolution."

Ending the Revolution topics he finished by saying, "We're all wondering
what the Revolution controller will look like, but I think right now we
should focus on discussing our current products."

Assuming Nintendo holds true to its promises, we'll be hearing more in the
coming weeks. Stay tuned for that. In the meantime, you can spend your time
daydreaming about Revolution's mystery, the controller, and fragging little
girls and old people over wi-fi.
Anonymous
August 18, 2005 11:08:13 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.game-boy,alt.games.video.nintendo.gameboy.advance,alt.games.video.nintendo.gamecube,rec.games.video.nintendo,uk.video.games.gamecube (More info?)

I can see this backfiring with nintendo. They may make a revolutionary
controller that may create a new way of playing games but considering
nintendo won't sell that many games & consoles in comparison to the
ps3/xbox360 most 3rd party companys will be unwilling to shell out for the
extra development costs utilising the 'revolutionary' features for a very
small market. They'll go with lowest common denominator and make games that
will play well across all 3 consoles. Of course that's assuming interest
from 3rd party companies will be there, but considering nintendo's habit of
imposing ultra-strict licensing guidelines and their use of expensive
propriety media formats this is unlikely.




<Highlander> wrote in message news:gdydnek5bsi0cp7eRVn-tA@comcast.com...
> http://cube.ign.com/articles/642/642885p1.html
>
> GC 2005: Revolution Teasing Continues
> More on its mystery, wi-fi, and, well, the elderly.
> by Fran Mirabella III
> August 17, 2005 - Nintendo's GC 2005 press conference entitled "Expand the
> Definition of Gaming" opened with a teaser trailer that cited its past
> home console accomplishments. The trailer flashed a series of slogan-esque
> claims that went as follows: "expanding the definition of mobile gaming"
> with the Game Boy, "power" with the SNES, "possibilities" with the N64,
> "gaming experience" with the N64 rumble pack, "gameplay" with the
> GameCube, "wireless" with the Wave Bird, "functionality" with the GBA, and
> "how to play games" with the DS. It ended with a question, "So what
> exactly is the definition of gaming?"
>
>
>
> The answer, "Please don't ask us. Because we will always expand the
> definition of gaming." Finally Revolution appeared with only the numbers
> 2006 -- its release year -- painted over it.
>
> Bernd Fakesch, spokesman and General Manager of Nintendo of Europe, opened
> with a speech that highlighted the company's commitment to innovating with
> games. Much like with the Revolution's unveiling at E3 this year, the
> enthusiasm for wi-fi gaming possibilities was echoed here too.
>
> Fakesch said, "In the console market, beginning in 2006 our wi-fi capable
> flagship Revolution will set new landmarks. By 'expanding the definition
> of gaming' we don't only mean an advance towards new limits of gaming, but
> also to new potential players. We want to win over new people and inspire
> them, those who have never thought about taking a controller into their
> hands -- more girls, young women, adults, and also elderly players.
> Certainly in the process we won't neglect the fan community. Germany needs
> new kinds of games and Nintendo is certainly the company that is
> best-suited to supply them. We hold a unique position in the market. We
> are among the worldwide leading hardware manufacturers and at the same
> time we are among the leading software developers. And that's both for
> handhelds and home consoles. Additionally, we have decades of experience
> where we have focused our entire know-how on the content of games and
> gaming fun."
>
> He finally added, "What are the new games of the future really going to
> look like? The titles of our innovative Nintendo DS give an idea of this."
>
> What we discerned from this is that, indeed, the company wants to continue
> to offer fresh gaming experiences, much of which will involve wi-fi play
> but, additionally, gaming for really old people. This, admittedly,
> perplexes us. The elderly can, at times, barely feed themselves and this
> isn't the kind of gaming most, let's say, Smash Bros. or Zelda fans would
> really want. So, we are certainly very interested to see what Revolution
> has in store to provide such a wide range of gaming.
>
>
> Later during the conference Nintendo brought up Revolution again, noting
> that it will be the next big thing and, again, very much wi-fi enabled. It
> seems the company can't not talk about wi-fi now that it's got the ball
> rolling. Interestingly, Fakesch said Revolution will have "a large number
> of novelties." The "novelties" translation, we speculate, may have
> actually referred to add-on services or peripherals. When asked for more
> information, he said, "The only thing I can tell you is that very soon
> there will be important news about Revolution."
>
> Ending the Revolution topics he finished by saying, "We're all wondering
> what the Revolution controller will look like, but I think right now we
> should focus on discussing our current products."
>
> Assuming Nintendo holds true to its promises, we'll be hearing more in the
> coming weeks. Stay tuned for that. In the meantime, you can spend your
> time daydreaming about Revolution's mystery, the controller, and fragging
> little girls and old people over wi-fi.
>
Anonymous
August 18, 2005 12:39:45 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.nintendo.gamecube (More info?)

I wouldn't be surprised to learn that 3rd party support will be
especially weak with the introduction of Revolution. Nintendo's really
banking on the innovative features behind the controller, they're
banking on it so much that they are eliminating support for basic
things like HD, and they seem to be sheltering the device from even 3rd
party developers to ensure that no one else steals it (remember,
Microsoft is one of their competitors).

Nintendo's going to need a pile of first party software to launch this
thing if they want to convince the consumer to buy it and to convince
3rd party developers to spend the resources to waterdown their projects
for the weak hardware and then enhance the software to support
whatever's innovative about the controller.

I'm very skeptical about the innovative nature of this controller. A
while back an interview on IGN had a representative speaking about the
revolutionary aspect of Revolution and the comments made it seem like
they didn't have a clue what they were doing. It was like all they
wanted was something "different" and didn't care what that meant. I
don't know, something might have gotten lost in the translation from
Japanese but it definately did seem like this innovation was an
afterthought. I'm also worried because Nintendo's annoucement a while
back on IGN revealed that the controller will have fewer analog sticks
and buttons. Many games, like Metroid Prime, utilized the use of the
controller to the max and I can't imagine how Metroid Prime 3 would
play with even fewer controls so this controller better be innovative
if they're cutting established functionality! I don't want to be
forced to constantly toggle from game to menu so that the controller
isn't "scary" looking. (The constant toggling between game and menu in
the Zelda series gets really old)
Related resources
Anonymous
August 18, 2005 3:28:55 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.game-boy,alt.games.video.nintendo.gameboy.advance,alt.games.video.nintendo.gamecube,rec.games.video.nintendo,uk.video.games.gamecube (More info?)

It really bugs me when people say things like "won't sell" and "very
small market". These markets are in no way small let alone "very small".

The Xbox has only outsold the gamecube by 1-2 million worldwide, that is
only roughly a 5% advantage (in nothing but console figures alone not
profit) we are still talking around 20 million and that is quite an
amount. All these things you are saying are based around nothing but
speculation. Anybody here who thought that the PSP would wipe the floor
with the DS last year was proabably saying exactly the same thing.

Nintendo by all accounts are trying something new, and with that comes
bigger risks but potentially much larger profits without any proper
information it's a bit soon to start making judgements.

Nintendo's recent cryptic announcement is starting to convince me along
with what they have said previously, that this controller will be
tactile or interact with you in some way, almost being a toy in it's own
right. There is nothing out there to prevent Nintendo from making an
extrememely soft, extremely comfortable controller (almost like a gel
filled appliance) that could alter shape, colour and even temperature if
needs be, the technology exists.

Then then that's just me speculating. :) 


KreLL wrote:
> I can see this backfiring with nintendo. They may make a revolutionary
> controller that may create a new way of playing games but considering
> nintendo won't sell that many games & consoles in comparison to the
> ps3/xbox360 most 3rd party companys will be unwilling to shell out for the
> extra development costs utilising the 'revolutionary' features for a very
> small market. They'll go with lowest common denominator and make games that
> will play well across all 3 consoles. Of course that's assuming interest
> from 3rd party companies will be there, but considering nintendo's habit of
> imposing ultra-strict licensing guidelines and their use of expensive
> propriety media formats this is unlikely.
>
>
>
>
> <Highlander> wrote in message news:gdydnek5bsi0cp7eRVn-tA@comcast.com...
>
>>http://cube.ign.com/articles/642/642885p1.html
>>
>>GC 2005: Revolution Teasing Continues
>>More on its mystery, wi-fi, and, well, the elderly.
>>by Fran Mirabella III
>>August 17, 2005 - Nintendo's GC 2005 press conference entitled "Expand the
>>Definition of Gaming" opened with a teaser trailer that cited its past
>>home console accomplishments. The trailer flashed a series of slogan-esque
>>claims that went as follows: "expanding the definition of mobile gaming"
>>with the Game Boy, "power" with the SNES, "possibilities" with the N64,
>>"gaming experience" with the N64 rumble pack, "gameplay" with the
>>GameCube, "wireless" with the Wave Bird, "functionality" with the GBA, and
>>"how to play games" with the DS. It ended with a question, "So what
>>exactly is the definition of gaming?"
>>
>>
>>
>>The answer, "Please don't ask us. Because we will always expand the
>>definition of gaming." Finally Revolution appeared with only the numbers
>>2006 -- its release year -- painted over it.
>>
>>Bernd Fakesch, spokesman and General Manager of Nintendo of Europe, opened
>>with a speech that highlighted the company's commitment to innovating with
>>games. Much like with the Revolution's unveiling at E3 this year, the
>>enthusiasm for wi-fi gaming possibilities was echoed here too.
>>
>>Fakesch said, "In the console market, beginning in 2006 our wi-fi capable
>>flagship Revolution will set new landmarks. By 'expanding the definition
>>of gaming' we don't only mean an advance towards new limits of gaming, but
>>also to new potential players. We want to win over new people and inspire
>>them, those who have never thought about taking a controller into their
>>hands -- more girls, young women, adults, and also elderly players.
>>Certainly in the process we won't neglect the fan community. Germany needs
>>new kinds of games and Nintendo is certainly the company that is
>>best-suited to supply them. We hold a unique position in the market. We
>>are among the worldwide leading hardware manufacturers and at the same
>>time we are among the leading software developers. And that's both for
>>handhelds and home consoles. Additionally, we have decades of experience
>>where we have focused our entire know-how on the content of games and
>>gaming fun."
>>
>>He finally added, "What are the new games of the future really going to
>>look like? The titles of our innovative Nintendo DS give an idea of this."
>>
>>What we discerned from this is that, indeed, the company wants to continue
>>to offer fresh gaming experiences, much of which will involve wi-fi play
>>but, additionally, gaming for really old people. This, admittedly,
>>perplexes us. The elderly can, at times, barely feed themselves and this
>>isn't the kind of gaming most, let's say, Smash Bros. or Zelda fans would
>>really want. So, we are certainly very interested to see what Revolution
>>has in store to provide such a wide range of gaming.
>>
>>
>>Later during the conference Nintendo brought up Revolution again, noting
>>that it will be the next big thing and, again, very much wi-fi enabled. It
>>seems the company can't not talk about wi-fi now that it's got the ball
>>rolling. Interestingly, Fakesch said Revolution will have "a large number
>>of novelties." The "novelties" translation, we speculate, may have
>>actually referred to add-on services or peripherals. When asked for more
>>information, he said, "The only thing I can tell you is that very soon
>>there will be important news about Revolution."
>>
>>Ending the Revolution topics he finished by saying, "We're all wondering
>>what the Revolution controller will look like, but I think right now we
>>should focus on discussing our current products."
>>
>>Assuming Nintendo holds true to its promises, we'll be hearing more in the
>>coming weeks. Stay tuned for that. In the meantime, you can spend your
>>time daydreaming about Revolution's mystery, the controller, and fragging
>>little girls and old people over wi-fi.
>>
>
>
>
Anonymous
August 18, 2005 6:56:29 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.game-boy,alt.games.video.nintendo.gameboy.advance,alt.games.video.nintendo.gamecube,rec.games.video.nintendo,uk.video.games.gamecube (More info?)

"KreLL" <who@cares.com> wrote in message
news:D e1c4t$75t$1@nwrdmz01.dmz.ncs.ea.ibs-infra.bt.com...
>I can see this backfiring with nintendo. They may make a revolutionary
>controller that may create a new way of playing games but considering
>nintendo won't sell that many games & consoles in comparison to the
>ps3/xbox360 most 3rd party companys will be unwilling to shell out for the
>extra development costs utilising the 'revolutionary' features for a very
>small market. They'll go with lowest common denominator and make games that
>will play well across all 3 consoles. Of course that's assuming interest
>from 3rd party companies will be there, but considering nintendo's habit of
>imposing ultra-strict licensing guidelines and their use of expensive
>propriety media formats this is unlikely.

The expensive proprietary media format is basically DVD. OH NO!! And they
removed the "ultra-strict licensing guidelines" years ago, as well as high
license fees.

I don't know what third party support will be like; it probably depends on
how well the Rev sells early on, and that will depend a lot on the software
that Nintendo brings to the table. But the issues you mentioned at the end
of your paragraph are non-issues.
Anonymous
August 18, 2005 8:01:16 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.nintendo.gamecube (More info?)

"scs0" <scs0@vol.com> wrote in message
news:1124379585.795285.105160@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
>I wouldn't be surprised to learn that 3rd party support will be
> especially weak with the introduction of Revolution. Nintendo's really
> banking on the innovative features behind the controller, they're
> banking on it so much that they are eliminating support for basic
> things like HD, and they seem to be sheltering the device from even 3rd
> party developers to ensure that no one else steals it (remember,
> Microsoft is one of their competitors).

Yeah, that's one thing I don't like - keeping it out of the hands of third
party developers, just so they can keep the controller a secret. I don't
think it will be a big deal, IF they start putting development kits out
there soon, but if they wait too long it's going to hurt them.

> Nintendo's going to need a pile of first party software to launch this
> thing if they want to convince the consumer to buy it and to convince
> 3rd party developers to spend the resources to waterdown their projects
> for the weak hardware and then enhance the software to support
> whatever's innovative about the controller.

I agree, except for the part about the weak hardware. We don't know if
that's true yet, and even if it is, it may not be enough of a difference to
matter.

> I'm very skeptical about the innovative nature of this controller. A
> while back an interview on IGN had a representative speaking about the
> revolutionary aspect of Revolution and the comments made it seem like
> they didn't have a clue what they were doing. It was like all they
> wanted was something "different" and didn't care what that meant. I
> don't know, something might have gotten lost in the translation from
> Japanese but it definately did seem like this innovation was an
> afterthought. I'm also worried because Nintendo's annoucement a while
> back on IGN revealed that the controller will have fewer analog sticks
> and buttons. Many games, like Metroid Prime, utilized the use of the
> controller to the max and I can't imagine how Metroid Prime 3 would
> play with even fewer controls so this controller better be innovative
> if they're cutting established functionality! I don't want to be
> forced to constantly toggle from game to menu so that the controller
> isn't "scary" looking. (The constant toggling between game and menu in
> the Zelda series gets really old)

I don't know - they sound pretty confident to me lately, so I think they
have come up with something nice. As far as having fewer controls, I'm not
sure how much to read into this. They said they wanted a controller that
was easy to use for novices, yet suitable for an epic game like Zelda. If
they can figure out a way to do this they will, but if not, they'll be
forced to make it more complicated to accomodate games like Metroid, Zelda,
Mario, and important third party games like Madden. There is simply no way
around that.
Anonymous
August 19, 2005 2:01:41 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.video.nintendo (More info?)

>There is nothing out there to prevent Nintendo from making an
>extrememely soft, extremely comfortable controller (almost like a gel
>filled appliance) that could alter shape, colour and even temperature
>if needs be, the technology exists.

Yes, but it would probably be very expensive to manufacture. If we are
going to speculate, there are a few things we must keep in mind:

- it must be reliable (therefore, not too complex in design)
- it must be cheap to build
- it must be intuitive
- it must be offer the same capabilty as a standard controller
(or no 3rd party ports)
- the tech is already in use, just not with gaming
- power consumption should be low (wireless means batteries, after
all)

We should also consider what Nintendo is already known to be connected
with, such as:

- voice recognition (since "Hey You, Pikachu!" on the N64)
- gyroscopic controls (Nintendo's work with Gyration since 2001)

The confusing part is the comment from Nintendo that modern controllers
have too many buttons and sticks, and the Revolution controller will be
less intimidating. So how on earth will it be able to offer the same
functionality as modern controllers (for use with ports and their back
catalog) and also be simpler in design? Some suggest that the Gamecube
controller ports mean that the existing gamecube controller will be
used for these purposes, but that means bundling a GC controller along
with a Revolution controller in the box. Now if you have a controller
that changes appearance to show different buttons, as some speculate,
it will be expensive to build, and lack tactile feedback.

So I'm left with no ideas at all. Temperature feedback would probably
use too much power. Same thing with pressure or other force feedback.
They've said they won't make a two-screen console, which may mean only
one TV screen, or may mean they won't put an LCD screen on the
controller. They could use a touchpad (as found on some laptops) but
that doesn't seem to qualify as not being used in games already.

There is still the gyroscope thing, and that "acceleration sensor" they
patented. And I strongly anticipate the use of voice recognition (a
headset?). Otherwise, I'm stumped.
Anonymous
August 19, 2005 1:25:30 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.video.nintendo (More info?)

>Revolution will have "a large number of
> novelties." The "novelties" translation, we
> speculate, may have actually referred to
> add-on services or peripherals.

Translation: It will double the purchase price to actually be able to
play the decent games.
Anonymous
August 19, 2005 4:44:12 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.nintendo.gamecube (More info?)

"scs0" <scs0@vol.com> wrote in message

>I wouldn't be surprised to learn that 3rd party support will be
> especially weak with the introduction of Revolution. Nintendo's really
> banking on the innovative features behind the controller, they're
> banking on it so much that they are eliminating support for basic
> things like HD,

What? HD is probably one of the first things I'd trade for innovation. No
real loss because HD won't apply to but a fraction of the people using the
machine, but would add dev costs across the board. I'd rather actually get
something for the money.

And, who's to say that all those games on the systems are going to support
HD even if the system does?
Anonymous
August 19, 2005 4:47:15 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.nintendo.gamecube (More info?)

"El Guapo" <plethora@pinatas.com> wrote in message news:gh2Ne.2040

> Yeah, that's one thing I don't like - keeping it out of the hands of third
> party developers, just so they can keep the controller a secret. I don't
> think it will be a big deal, IF they start putting development kits out
> there soon, but if they wait too long it's going to hurt them.

I don't know. Depends on when the PS3 gets locked down and is at least at a
stage where it's stable. That will happen well before the Rev's launch and
there's probably plenty of time.
Anonymous
August 29, 2005 6:10:03 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.video.game-boy,alt.games.video.nintendo.gameboy.advance,alt.games.video.nintendo.gamecube,rec.games.video.nintendo,uk.video.games.gamecube (More info?)

> http://cube.ign.com/articles/642/642885p1.html
>
>GC 2005: Revolution Teasing Continues
>More on its mystery, wi-fi, and, well, the elderly.
>by Fran Mirabella III

>but, additionally, gaming for really old people. This, admittedly, perplexes
>us. The elderly can, at times, barely feed themselves and this isn't the

... I had to go check the actual IGN page, cause it beggars belief
that a professional writer could write something so bone-stupid. And yet,
he did.

--
When I log into my Xenix system with my 110 baud teletype, both vi
*and* Emacs are just too damn slow. They print useless messages like,
'C-h for help' and '"foo" File is read only'. So I use the editor
that doesn't waste my VALUABLE time. -Patrick J. LoPresti
August 31, 2005 4:53:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.video.nintendo (More info?)

Dan Mazurowski wrote:
>>There is nothing out there to prevent Nintendo from making an
>>extrememely soft, extremely comfortable controller (almost like a gel
>>filled appliance) that could alter shape, colour and even temperature
>>if needs be, the technology exists.
>
>
> Yes, but it would probably be very expensive to manufacture. If we are
> going to speculate, there are a few things we must keep in mind:
>
> - it must be reliable (therefore, not too complex in design)
> - it must be cheap to build
> - it must be intuitive
> - it must be offer the same capabilty as a standard controller
> (or no 3rd party ports)
> - the tech is already in use, just not with gaming
> - power consumption should be low (wireless means batteries, after
> all)
>
> We should also consider what Nintendo is already known to be connected
> with, such as:
>
> - voice recognition (since "Hey You, Pikachu!" on the N64)
> - gyroscopic controls (Nintendo's work with Gyration since 2001)
>
> The confusing part is the comment from Nintendo that modern controllers
> have too many buttons and sticks, and the Revolution controller will be
> less intimidating. So how on earth will it be able to offer the same
> functionality as modern controllers (for use with ports and their back
> catalog) and also be simpler in design? Some suggest that the Gamecube
> controller ports mean that the existing gamecube controller will be
> used for these purposes, but that means bundling a GC controller along
> with a Revolution controller in the box. Now if you have a controller
> that changes appearance to show different buttons, as some speculate,
> it will be expensive to build, and lack tactile feedback.
>
> So I'm left with no ideas at all. Temperature feedback would probably
> use too much power. Same thing with pressure or other force feedback.
> They've said they won't make a two-screen console, which may mean only
> one TV screen, or may mean they won't put an LCD screen on the
> controller. They could use a touchpad (as found on some laptops) but
> that doesn't seem to qualify as not being used in games already.
>
> There is still the gyroscope thing, and that "acceleration sensor" they
> patented. And I strongly anticipate the use of voice recognition (a
> headset?). Otherwise, I'm stumped.
>

If they make a controller that is controlled with some or all of the
fingers, plus thumbs, and I'll buy it. Controllers have gotten to the
point where they're senseless; ten different things for two thumbs and
four or five for all the fingers combined.

If you still play NES, try turning the controller over- put your thumbs
on the back and work the buttons/keypad with your fingers (with the cord
pointing down). Much faster and easier, at least for me..

John
Anonymous
September 1, 2005 12:57:46 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.video.nintendo (More info?)

JohnM <eaotis@cbpu.com> wrote in
news:4315e098$0$11181$9a6e19ea@news.newshosting.com:
>
> If they make a controller that is controlled with some or all
> of the fingers, plus thumbs, and I'll buy it. Controllers have
> gotten to the point where they're senseless; ten different
> things for two thumbs and four or five for all the fingers
> combined.
>
> If you still play NES, try turning the controller over- put
> your thumbs on the back and work the buttons/keypad with your
> fingers (with the cord pointing down). Much faster and easier,
> at least for me..
>
> John
>

It sounds like you'd be much happier with an arcade stick.
!