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Modem/ Wireless Router, MAJOR BOTTLENECK Issue

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October 29, 2011 9:48:39 PM

So I have run into some problems lately with my Modem and im just asking the larger audience for there advice.

Current internet set up is a Modem/Wireless router from Bell ( Model: 2701hg-g)

I have two devices connected Via ethernet,
Secondary PS3
Personal Desktop

As for Wireless there is:

Primary PS3
Kitchen Laptop
Personal Laptop
Sisters Macbook Pro
iPhone 4 (Mine)
iPhone 4 (Sisters)
Nintendo DS

All of these devices connect to this network via 802.11G due to the capabilities of the router.

For an average day, My sister is on her computer, my dad is on kitchen laptop and im on my dektop.
if im not at desktop then im on PS3.

Another issue is even when im say copying a file from one computer to another through the network all access is knocked down.


I figure this is due to the router itself but if it is not then I would prefer not to buy anything.

Eventually i do plan to upgrade to a wireless N router to allow for HD streaming, but if this bottleneck will still exist, then tere is no point i see in doing that anytime soon

for comparison sake, this is my internet speed test

http://www.speedtest.net/result/1562732768.png

knowing that our plan we pay for states download speeds up to 16 mbps, and upload speeds up to 1 mbps

My problems arise when one of these are using a high bandwidith of the data stream

For Example, Once a day I plug in my iPhone and download podcasts. When i do this the network across the rest of network takes a dive.

or if im downloading a games over PSN, it literally knocks every other device offline.
October 29, 2011 11:39:55 PM

With so many devices connecting through a simple G "line" what do you expect? :) 
It shouldn't be an issue for the devices with Ethernet connection. If it is you may buy a cheap hub and connect through it instead of the wireless router. A current N class router should do much better job for the wireless access. I am not a network specialist but they besides being faster have much better muptipoint access capabilities.
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October 29, 2011 11:45:58 PM

That's a lot of devices for that bandwidth. Do you really need all those devices? Either get more bandwidth or a 2nd internet line from your isp.
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October 30, 2011 12:02:14 AM

psycrosis said:
knowing that our plan we pay for states download speeds up to 16 mbps, and upload speeds up to 1 mbps
Be sure to read the 'fine print' on your ISPs rate plan.
There's going to be an asterisk or a footnote to those performance figures.
Does your ISP have a bandwidth usage cap? How close to the cap do you get?


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October 30, 2011 12:06:52 AM

That upload is extremely low. I get a higher upload than that on a 7.2 Hspda connection.
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October 30, 2011 12:18:24 AM

Upstream bottlenecks = outside your house. It might even be upstream from Bell.
And if you're hitting an over saturated server can sometimes make it seem like it's a bandwidth issue when it's a server capacity issue.
You'll probably see big differences in download speeds at non-peak hours if there any type of upstream bottlenecks
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October 30, 2011 12:23:10 AM

Too many devices simple. Most routers will struggle with that amount of devices.

I've read a article the otherday you can make a router with Gpus as well. They used two Gtx 480s for a 10G multispeed router.
Just google Packetshader.pdf. Was a interesting article

Other thing to note speedtests show the throughput on only a certain road on the internet. There's millions of roads and some are dual lanes some are single lanes some have traffick jams some don't. All that will influence it. Your isp only guarantee throughput up to their gateway beyond that its out of their hands.
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October 30, 2011 12:30:23 AM

That article is possible i suppose, my dad does use uTorrent on occasion.

To note, i reach the advertised speeds bell says, so im not too worried about that

and even though all those devices connect,

at any given time, 3 at most are using the network to its fullest, the others are off or dormant
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October 30, 2011 12:51:16 AM

Run the speedtest at different times of the day/night, and with all but one device shut down as the tester (the wired PC preferably) and compare that with the 'full monty' on a busy evening. I think those test results will show you if you increased bandwidth in the home is worth pursuing.

Remember, you're also competing with upstream bottlenecks too.
You could fix your inside wire/wireless bandwidth issues and still not see a major improvement.
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October 30, 2011 12:53:20 AM

WR2 said:
Run the speedtest at different times of the day/night, and with all but one device shut down as the tester (the wired PC preferably) and compare that with the 'full monty' on a busy evening. I think those test results will show you if you increased bandwidth in the home is worth pursuing.

Remember, you're also competing with upstream bottlenecks too.
You could fix your inside wire/wireless bandwidth issues and still not see a major improvement.



What do you mean by upstreamed bottle neck?

the upload rate from devices in my house or upload from the neighbourhood going to bell?
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October 30, 2011 12:59:41 AM

I'm talking mostly about issuing out this:
"Another issue is even when im say copying a file from one computer to another through the network all access is knocked down." what don't depend on the external connection.
A better N class router should significantly increase internal transfers, but for all devices, connected through Ethernet, a /very cheap/ hub may do a great job /if overloading your router is bottlenecking the transfer over the ethernet/.
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October 30, 2011 3:58:02 AM

I think as others have stated, you may have overloaded the router. Another thing to consider is other wireless interference. Cordless phones, microwave oven, CFL bulbs, etc. They all give off some form of frequency interference.

A wireless-N router might alleviate the problem, but make sure if you go through this route to disable the router feature in the modem as it may conflict with each other. I have a wireless-N router, modem and 2 gigabit switches (ie modem > router > gigabit switch > gigabit switch). 7 devices directly wired into the gigabit switches and at most 2 devices connecting wirelessly. At minimum, 6 devices are on at the same time everyday (5 wired, 1 wireless). I have to do a power cycle whenever I notice the local network going 'wonky' (about once a month).

If you plan on streaming HD content from the web, wireless should be no issue. But if you plan on streaming HD content through your network (1080p, DTS, all the bells and whistles), then I would recommend using wired ethernet. When streaming HD content using wireless-N router, it was struggling (not running as smoothly as I had hoped). I eliminated that when I decided to go through wired ethernet.

I'm also with Bell, but I only have around 6Mbps download and around 0.5Mbps upload. The upside is that I have unlimited bandwidth (no caps, no restrictions). It's an old grandfathered plan. The drawback is the cost to maintain it as they jack the cost of the plan every 6 months or so. A tactic to try to force users off the old plan onto their capped less value plans.
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November 1, 2011 2:44:43 PM

Would it still be overloaded if none of that is connectd st once though?

I do plan on eventually wiring the house with ethernet wiring throughtout as i do understand the limits of wireless and HD content, but can it be a megabit, or should i really go forward with a gigbit stream, as my internet service is only 100, as far as i understand it

I would trade any day for your plan, how much you paying for it if i may ask?
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November 2, 2011 1:36:27 AM

I'm paying close to $75 (taxes included) for the plan (it used to be around $40-50; can't honestly remember). I'm still keeping it because there's no restrictions, just the occasional throttling from Bell. Usage can peak to 300GB/month.

The wireless-N router I have is a 100Mb switch and my modem is hooked up to it. The local network is all hooked up to the gigabit switches with the exception of my brother's computer which is using wireless (going to change it to wired eventually).

Basically, my network consists of
- network printer
- NAS drive
- 2 desktop PCs (1 wireless)
- 1 notebook
- 1 work notebook (wireless; not all the time)
- PS3
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November 13, 2011 7:12:01 PM

Best answer selected by psycrosis.
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