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Integrated CPU/PSU

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October 31, 2011 12:25:12 AM

Hi everybody,

I'm about to begin building my first HTPC and would like some advice as to what CPU and GPU to buy.

My preference is to go with an integrated CPU/GPU unit such as the AMD E-350 as I don't intend to do any gaming on the system and want to keep the power and heat/cooling noise to a minimum.

The only thing that I'm not sure of is, if this processor or any other integrated processor can play 1080p 3d blu-ray propperly (HDMI 1.4).

I've heard that most have issues with judder caused by a slight incompatibility with the frame rate.

Is this fact?

Any advice would be appreciated.

Thanks

More about : integrated cpu psu

October 31, 2011 12:47:08 AM

The AMD socket FM1 CPU's have a GPU and the benchmarks that I have seen arn't too bad.
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a c 471 à CPUs
October 31, 2011 12:49:46 AM

The E-350 should suffice for your needs.

I have not heard of judder issues caused by "a slight incompatibility with the frame rate" regarding the E-350. Perhaps the slightly more powerful E-450 will do?

From a videophile perspective, there is a possibility with some juddering though. This stems from the fact that most movies are filmed at 23.976 frames per second. Graphic cards (and this includes graphic cores) output at 60Hz or 60 frames per second. 23.976 does not divide evenly with 60. Even if you can lower the signal output to 48Hz or 48 frames per second, 23.976 does not divide 48 evenly, but it is much better than dividing into 60. That would mean that a frame would repeat about once every 16.67 minutes.
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October 31, 2011 1:10:58 AM

Hi jaguarskx,

"movies are filmed at 23.976 frames per second. Graphic cards (and this includes graphic cores) output at 60Hz or 60 frames per second" is what I was trying to say with slight incompatibility with the frame rate.

Is there any way to match the graphics card's output to the film's frame rate?

Also for stereoscopic 3d the graphics card would need to output at 23.976 frames per second X 2. Once each for the left and right eye views. Does this mean that the GPU output needs to be set to 47.952 frames per second for an ideal match? Also since 2D frame rate is also 23.976 frames per second wouldn't this also mean that the juddering is also an issue for 2D?

It would seem strange given the volume of media being played on PC these days that GPU output can't be configured to match the media???

Thanks
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a c 471 à CPUs
October 31, 2011 1:42:48 AM

You cannot match the Hz output to the film's frame rate. The Hz output is also determined by what is accepted by the monitor. My monitors only accepts 60Hz so 60Hz is the only option to choose. Some monitors may allow you to choose a different Hz (usually 75Hz), but it varies from model to model.

For 3D on a PC you need a 120Hz monitor that supports 3D. All 3D monitors are 120Hz monitors, but I don't believe all 120Hz monitors support 3D.

A few people may notice juddering, but most will not. If you want to watch movies in the digital age, then this is what you need to deal with. All DVD players output at 60Hz and most Blu-Ray player output at 60Hz as well, but some BR players can decrease output frequencies to 48Hz.
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October 31, 2011 3:02:32 AM

What if i intend to display on a flat screen TV?
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a c 471 à CPUs
October 31, 2011 5:04:38 AM

No difference. DVI and HDMI work at 60Hz. If you really want to avoid as much video juddering as possible when watching a movie, then your best bet is to buy a Blu-Ray player that can output a both 48Hz and 60Hz.
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November 1, 2011 12:20:11 AM

Hi jaguarskx,

Thanks for your advice.

I think I understand the issue now.

I've had a bit of a look around and the Asus E45M1-M PRO motherboard (complete with AMD E-450 APU) seems to tick all of the boxes. It appears to come with an HDMI 1.4a output along with slightly better CPU and GPU performance than the E-350 while remaining pasive cooled.

Regards

Flip

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