Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Need help moving overseas want to bring computer

Last response: in Components
Share
November 2, 2011 2:40:45 AM

Hi there, I'm in a dilemma atm. I am selling my current rig so that I can move to smaller form factor so that I can take my computer with me. I'll be moving to a third world country (Bangladesh) where there are frequent (daily) brown outs and the occasional black outs. Because of this I was thinking about getting a UPS so that my components won't get fried (due to surges I think).

Now here is the thing. The PSU I'll be using is the Seasonic X850W PSU, it's the US model so obviously runs 110V but can be used anywhere else and it will automatically work at 220V. Because of this, it doesn't come with the two prong plug like the European model. So I thought of getting a 110V UPS and plugged a two prong adapter to it and plug it directly to the wall meanwhile the computer will be plugged to the UPS.
Then again there was another option. Get a 220V UPS and plug the computer in there, but if I get this one I will need to get a PSU plug with the two prongs, not sure where to get those but can I get a cable that will plug into my PSU and have the two prong end? I think this second option is better.

This is where I need help. I need someone to recommend me a good quality UPS that will work perfectly overseas for my needs. I'm not really interested in being able to run the computer for another 30 minutes, I'm really looking to get one so that I can protect my computer from surges, etc. Since I'm really just looking for a glorified surge protector, does the wattage matter?

Might need to know the power being drawn from the computer
Intel Core i7 2600K @ 5GHz
ATI 5970 Mild O/C
-----------------------------------------

Here is the UPS that I was thinking of getting, Battery Backup with Tower or Horizontal Form Factor (1500VA)

Part # F6C1500-TW-RK. I went with this one because it's an "Online UPS" which means more stable power goes through I think.

Can someone please give me some advice. I'd really like to take my computer overseas with me but I'm worried about breaking it due to the frequent brown-outs that's why I thought about getting a UPS. But I'm confused as to which UPS I should go for because of the whole 110/220V issue.
a b ) Power supply
November 2, 2011 3:25:30 AM

Don't worry about 110V/220V, most of UPS and any electronics instruments are came with 110V/220V switch, so you can switch it manually.

What about budget?
m
0
l
a b ) Power supply
November 2, 2011 3:46:14 AM

Start from the wall, determining available power and plug configuration.

From this source:

http://users.telenet.be/worldstandards/electricity.htm#...

Power in Bangladesh is 220V, 50Hz, and can use any of four possible plugs. Since your UPS will be the thing plugged into the wall, it must be able to handle that. So here's an example:

http://www.apc.com/resource/include/techspec_index.cfm?...

Some models can handle 50/60Hz automatically (like this one), others require a switch to flip between 50/60. I'd suggest getting one that covers a useful range automatically, like this one does.

To plug it into the wall, you need to get an adapter that will take the plug on the UPS and fit one of the four plugs that they (may) use in Bangladesh.

Your PSU will handle the output voltage from the UPS, 230V & 50Hz (in this case). You may need an adapter again to plug your PSU into your UPS.

Edit 1: An easier approach may be this type UPS:

http://www.apc.com/resource/include/techspec_index.cfm?...

Add an adapter as necessary to plug it into the wall. It can handle 220V, 50Hz. It outputs 120V. So no adapters are required for your PSU and peripheral equipment

Edit 2: As for Wattage, make sure the UPS can handle the total load for all of the US equipment you will bring with you (Monitor, speakers, etc.). Otherwise it will overload even when it is not running off the battery.

Depending on the approach you take, some of this equipment may have to be replaced if they can't handle 230V. Others may need not only an adapter, but also a converter (which changes the voltage from 230 to 120).
m
0
l
Related resources
November 2, 2011 2:22:18 PM

Twoboxer said:
Start from the wall, determining available power and plug configuration.

From this source:

http://users.telenet.be/worldstandards/electricity.htm#...

Power in Bangladesh is 220V, 50Hz, and can use any of four possible plugs. Since your UPS will be the thing plugged into the wall, it must be able to handle that. So here's an example:

http://www.apc.com/resource/include/techspec_index.cfm?...

Some models can handle 50/60Hz automatically (like this one), others require a switch to flip between 50/60. I'd suggest getting one that covers a useful range automatically, like this one does.

To plug it into the wall, you need to get an adapter that will take the plug on the UPS and fit one of the four plugs that they (may) use in Bangladesh.

Your PSU will handle the output voltage from the UPS, 230V & 50Hz (in this case). You may need an adapter again to plug your PSU into your UPS.

Edit 1: An easier approach may be this type UPS:

http://www.apc.com/resource/include/techspec_index.cfm?...

Add an adapter as necessary to plug it into the wall. It can handle 220V, 50Hz. It outputs 120V. So no adapters are required for your PSU and peripheral equipment

Edit 2: As for Wattage, make sure the UPS can handle the total load for all of the US equipment you will bring with you (Monitor, speakers, etc.). Otherwise it will overload even when it is not running off the battery.

Depending on the approach you take, some of this equipment may have to be replaced if they can't handle 230V. Others may need not only an adapter, but also a converter (which changes the voltage from 230 to 120).


Thanks so much for the info! Bangladesh definitely uses the Type C plug, would it be better to get a UPS that outputs in 120V or 220V? I'm asking because I don't want the UPS to do more work than it has to, for example taking in 220V and outputting 120V. I would think 1500VA/1000W rating is enough to power my computer and a IPS monitor plus the Corsair SP2500 2.1 speakers. How does this sound?

Probably should go with a 220V UPS and have some adapters to plug in the monitor/speakers/computer to the UPS. Is that okay to do or will it short out the UPS?
m
0
l
a c 274 ) Power supply
November 2, 2011 2:45:20 PM

Like Twoboxer says your psu isn't a problem Active PFC,you'll just need appropriate power cables for some of your gear.
A 1500VA ups is a perfect size.
I use one on my i7860 rig and have over 45min reserve power.
Whatever you do ship your case without the cooler mounted if it's not stock.
m
0
l
November 2, 2011 7:48:23 PM

davcon said:
Like Twoboxer says your psu isn't a problem Active PFC,you'll just need appropriate power cables for some of your gear.
A 1500VA ups is a perfect size.
I use one on my i7860 rig and have over 45min reserve power.
Whatever you do ship your case without the cooler mounted if it's not stock.



Sounds good I just don't know how a UPS 110V will be overseas, would it be compatible with 220V if I put in a adapter in the end to change the plug? As for shipping wise, I was planning on packing it inside with foam all around, It will all be watercooled so I'm gonna empty it before I take it with me. I won't have to worry about big heatsinks bending the motherboard so I should be fine. Anyone know what sort of material I should use to put in the inside of the case??
m
0
l
November 2, 2011 8:22:02 PM

I've decided to go with this UPS, http://www.ayagroup.com/product.php?productid=1594

Not sure if it's an "online" ups but I think those are really for high end servers. Will this UPS protect my computer adequately against frequent brown-outs (3-4 times a day)? I need the battery to last for 5 years though. Thing is when a brown out occurs I will immediately shut down the computer, will this reduce the battery usage and hopefully last 5 years??

I'm going to put a 110V -> 220V adapter in the end of the UPS so that I can plug it in over there, while the computer/monitor/speakers will be plugged directly into the UPS. The UPS is rated for 110V and 220V so I think everything should go smoothly. Can someone help me out here?
m
0
l
a c 1193 ) Power supply
November 2, 2011 9:43:28 PM

blazarcher said:
I've decided to go with this UPS, http://www.ayagroup.com/product.php?productid=1594

Not sure if it's an "online" ups but I think those are really for high end servers. Will this UPS protect my computer adequately against frequent brown-outs (3-4 times a day)? I need the battery to last for 5 years though. Thing is when a brown out occurs I will immediately shut down the computer, will this reduce the battery usage and hopefully last 5 years??

I'm going to put a 110V -> 220V adapter in the end of the UPS so that I can plug it in over there, while the computer/monitor/speakers will be plugged directly into the UPS. The UPS is rated for 110V and 220V so I think everything should go smoothly. Can someone help me out here?

Do you have an RS-232 Interface (i.e. Serial Port) on your motherboard?

The Powercom BNT-1500AP, that you linked to, communicates with your PC through the RS-232 Interface so that when a power outage is detected, the UPS monitoring application will issue a shutdown command to the OS.

Modern UPS' don't use the RS-232 Interface anymore because it's obsolete and most new motherboards don't have this port. The USB interface is the most common with most modern UPS'.
m
0
l
November 3, 2011 12:39:17 AM

ko888 said:
Do you have an RS-232 Interface (i.e. Serial Port) on your motherboard?

The Powercom BNT-1500AP, that you linked to, communicates with your PC through the RS-232 Interface so that when a power outage is detected, the UPS monitoring application will issue a shutdown command to the OS.

Modern UPS' don't use the RS-232 Interface anymore because it's obsolete and most new motherboards don't have this port. The USB interface is the most common with most modern UPS'.



Didn't know that, the motherboard probably wouldn't have that Interface it just came out, which UPS would u recommend I get?
m
0
l
a c 1193 ) Power supply
November 3, 2011 1:30:44 AM

blazarcher said:
Didn't know that, the motherboard probably wouldn't have that Interface it just came out, which UPS would u recommend I get?

What is the make and model of the motherboard? A few of the motherboards (e.g. ASRock) still have a legacy COM (a.k.a. RS-232/Serial) port header on some of their Cougar Point chipset motherboards but no rear I/O panel COM port.

I don't know whether the following USB to RS232 DB9 male(Serial) cable may solve this problem. There's a very good chance that it will work fine. You can always contact Powercom to confirm whether or not it will work.

http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=103&...
m
0
l
November 3, 2011 1:46:18 AM

ko888 said:
What is the make and model of the motherboard? A few of the motherboards (e.g. ASRock) still have a legacy COM (a.k.a. RS-232/Serial) port header on some of their Cougar Point chipset motherboards but no rear I/O panel COM port.

I don't know whether the following USB to RS232 DB9 male(Serial) cable may solve this problem. There's a very good chance that it will work fine. You can always contact Powercom to confirm whether or not it will work.

http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=103&...



I'll be going with the ASUS Maximus IV Gene-Z (Z68 mATX motherboard). I'm pretty sure I can't get that cable to get plugged it, shouldn't i just got with a UPS with a USB? Which would you recommend?
m
0
l
a b ) Power supply
November 3, 2011 3:11:15 AM

Sorry, a little late to respojd here. But you have to consider more than just your PSU (ie, your tower). There's your monitor, speakers, and any other peripheral you take with.

If they *all* accept 220V/50Hz, no problem. If not, the easiest solution is a UPS that takes 220 in and puts 120 out. And that's the choice I'd favor.

And the UPS you chose looks pretty good, though I know nothing about the Brand Name. I can't see your rig drawing more than 600W from the PSU , add 100W for ~85% efficiency, add ~100W for your monitor, and you're still below the 900W rating. All you will need is to adapt its cord to the wall, ie, an adapter.

USB to serial connectors do work. I don't know that you really need to connect it to the PC though, unless you need the connection to set 120V 60Hz as the output. Lack of a USB connector on that PSU may mean an older design, so it may be worthwhile to look at other PSUs - but the specs on the one you chose look perfect.
m
0
l
November 3, 2011 3:18:37 AM

Twoboxer said:
Sorry, a little late to respojd here. But you have to consider more than just your PSU (ie, your tower). There's your monitor, speakers, and any other peripheral you take with.

If they *all* accept 220V/50Hz, no problem. If not, the easiest solution is a UPS that takes 220 in and puts 120 out. And that's the choice I'd favor.

And the UPS you chose looks pretty good, though I know nothing about the Brand Name. I can't see your rig drawing more than 600W from the PSU , add 100W for ~85% efficiency, add ~100W for your monitor, and you're still below the 900W rating. All you will need is to adapt its cord to the wall, ie, an adapter.

USB to serial connectors do work. I don't know that you really need to connect it to the PC though, unless you need the connection to set 120V 60Hz as the output. Lack of a USB connector on that PSU may mean an older design, so it may be worthwhile to look at other PSUs - but the specs on the one you chose look perfect.



Thanks a lot man, for the price I don't think I could go wrong with that UPS. If you have an favorites, would definitely help =)
Would help if you can recommend brands, I need one that will last 5 years and this one's warranty is ONLY 2 years so I don't think it will last. How is Belkin for UPS's?
m
0
l
a b ) Power supply
November 3, 2011 3:38:15 AM

I've used APC mostly, and probably one Cyberpower and one TrippLite. The only one that seemed problematic was the TrippLite. It became nothing more than a power strip after a couple of years.

ATM I have roughly 10 APC UPSs running, and no attached device has ever shut down when the power went out. But my experience is nothing more than anecdotal - it proves nothing.

I thnk I'd worry more about warranty service/replacement and batteries. You are not going to get through 5 years with one battery, or one set of batteries depending on how your UPS is configured.

I think I'd try to find out more about what is available "locally" in Bangladesh. UPSs are probably more common than you think.

If you have no info, I'd buy an APC UPS if they make one to match your spec, and begin looking for alternatives immediately on arrival.

Good luck to you.
m
0
l
November 3, 2011 3:44:47 AM

Your probably right, I'll just get a UPS over there I guess. Quick question, if I do go with one of those, would using a simple adapter on the computer/monitor/speakers be enough to plug into the UPS and work without issue?
m
0
l
a b ) Power supply
November 3, 2011 3:50:18 AM

You won't need any adapters for anything you plug into a UPS providing 120V output, assuming you buy it here in the US. The sockets will match your plugs, which is why its a nice alternative.

If you buy in Bangladesh . . . you may need more adapters, you may not. The plugs may be different. But they should be available locally.

And don't forget to consider your printer . . . if you are bringing one.
m
0
l
November 3, 2011 3:58:25 AM

Won't be bringing a printer with me xD The only reason I wanted to get a UPS from here is because over there they really don't have good UPS's, definitely don't have any "online" UPS's. Is the basic UPS all I need to protect my components from frequent brown outs?
m
0
l
a b ) Power supply
November 3, 2011 4:13:03 AM

Yes. But it won't run on battery forever during a brownout.
m
0
l
November 3, 2011 4:14:25 AM

I understand, I'm really looking to just protect my hardware, I honestly don't care about the battery life.
m
0
l
November 5, 2011 5:21:32 PM

So will my components be protected with any old UPS?
m
0
l
November 5, 2011 6:41:59 PM

blazarcher said:
Hi there, I'm in a dilemma atm. I am selling my current rig so that I can move to smaller form factor so that I can take my computer with me. I'll be moving to a third world country (Bangladesh) where there are frequent (daily) brown outs and the occasional black outs. Because of this I was thinking about getting a UPS so that my components won't get fried (due to surges I think).

Now here is the thing. The PSU I'll be using is the Seasonic X850W PSU, it's the US model so obviously runs 110V but can be used anywhere else and it will automatically work at 220V. Because of this, it doesn't come with the two prong plug like the European model. So I thought of getting a 110V UPS and plugged a two prong adapter to it and plug it directly to the wall meanwhile the computer will be plugged to the UPS.
Then again there was another option. Get a 220V UPS and plug the computer in there, but if I get this one I will need to get a PSU plug with the two prongs, not sure where to get those but can I get a cable that will plug into my PSU and have the two prong end? I think this second option is better.

This is where I need help. I need someone to recommend me a good quality UPS that will work perfectly overseas for my needs. I'm not really interested in being able to run the computer for another 30 minutes, I'm really looking to get one so that I can protect my computer from surges, etc. Since I'm really just looking for a glorified surge protector, does the wattage matter?

Might need to know the power being drawn from the computer
Intel Core i7 2600K @ 5GHz
ATI 5970 Mild O/C
-----------------------------------------

Here is the UPS that I was thinking of getting, Battery Backup with Tower or Horizontal Form Factor (1500VA)

Part # F6C1500-TW-RK. I went with this one because it's an "Online UPS" which means more stable power goes through I think.

Can someone please give me some advice. I'd really like to take my computer overseas with me but I'm worried about breaking it due to the frequent brown-outs that's why I thought about getting a UPS. But I'm confused as to which UPS I should go for because of the whole 110/220V issue.

A ups watts can be calculated easily. It 60 percent of its VA RATING. So that will around your psu size. But rule of the thumb always choose one approximately twice the size of your psu's wattage. 1600 to 1700VA. That once you chose will do but it will just run out steam a bit earlier
m
0
l
November 6, 2011 4:20:19 PM

gnomio said:
A ups watts can be calculated easily. It 60 percent of its VA RATING. So that will around your psu size. But rule of the thumb always choose one approximately twice the size of your psu's wattage. 1600 to 1700VA. That once you chose will do but it will just run out steam a bit earlier



Thanks man, I'm gonna get myself a UPS over there. I just hope there is nothing wrong connecting a NEC MultiSync EA232WMi and my computer to their UPS's rated at 220V's.
All I care a bout is surge protection tbh, battery life doesn't matter as long as the UPS can protect my components from short circuiting, etc.
m
0
l
a b ) Power supply
November 6, 2011 4:27:23 PM

blazarcher said:
. . . I just hope there is nothing wrong connecting a NEC MultiSync EA232WMi and my computer to their UPS's rated at 220V's.
If the OUTPUT of the UPS is 120V, it doesn't matter what the INPUT voltage is. Your monitor will get the same power its getting now.

OTOH, if these are the specs for your monitor:

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/738764-REG/NEC_V3...

Your monitor may also accept 220V. If your monitor and PC PSU are the ONLY two devices considered, they both would work if the OUTPUT of the UPS were 220V.

m
0
l
November 7, 2011 3:57:06 PM

Great. yup pretty much I'll get a 220V UPS over there and plug just my computer and monitor to it and also my Lenovo X220 (Pretty sure that'll run 220V as well). The monitor has built in speakers so I won't have to worry about that and besides I usually use headphones, gonna need to when you got a ASUS STX soundcard.
m
0
l
December 2, 2011 4:19:27 AM

Need help! So basically I'm going to get myself a 220V UPS that I can use perfectly fine over there. However, my PSU cable has the 120V plug, is it OKAY if I use a simple adapter to plug it into my UPS?
m
0
l
!