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Psu for 6870 cf: did I mess up??

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November 3, 2011 1:50:03 AM

I was wondering if this : http://www.amazon.com/Corsair-Certified-Compatible-Plat... psu would be enough to cf 6870's? Right now I'm running 1 sapphire 6870 with an intel i3 2100. I think I'm right around the limit, which is not good from what I understand. Unfortunately it's already assembled so I don't have the option of a different one for now (first build, one of the many lessons I'm learning!).

I'm more than happy with my performance now (only running one monitor at 1650x1080) I'm just kind of brainstorming for the future upgrades. Would the i3 2100 "bottleneck" 6870's in cf? Or would I be better served to upgrade my cpu (to a next gen quad core) and gpu (single card) a few years down the road if my psu is not enough for a 6870 cf?

More about : psu 6870 mess

a c 80 ) Power supply
November 3, 2011 2:53:06 AM

You can run the two 6870's in crossfire with a 600w power supply of course you do need four 6 pin power connectors for the two cards. You can of course make changes further on down the road if you want , but for now you can squeak by with the 600w and the i3 2100.
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November 3, 2011 2:58:13 AM

600W should be enough, 650W would of been more ideal.

It shouldn't bottleneck it, but you might want to overclock it a bit to loosen the bottle hole.
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November 3, 2011 3:13:11 AM

Thanks a bunch for the quick answers

Is it true that I can wreck my whole system if the psu is not enough? I'd honestly rather not do it if that would be the cost (or is that less likely to happen since the 600w is so close?).

I apologize for any dumb questions, I'm still very new at this!
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a b ) Power supply
November 3, 2011 3:14:34 AM

If you want to objectively, accurately and scientifically determine what PSU power is required for your Vid card and PC in both watts and 12v rail amps., the forum Utility link below will show you how easy it is to calculate this information and objectively determine which PSUs are quality built, reliable PSUs that can meet your needs. Be advised that the available 12v rail amps. is just as important as the total PSU wattage. You need both to be correct.

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/314712-28-please-read...
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November 3, 2011 3:15:33 AM

trihedral said:
600W should be enough, 650W would of been more ideal.

It shouldn't bottleneck it, but you might want to overclock it a bit to loosen the bottle hole.


How do I overclock the 2100? I was under the impression that it was not possible with that cpu. That'd be cool though because I did get an aftermarket cooler.
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November 3, 2011 4:35:18 AM

^ lol!

True, you're confusing him bro, he barely knows anything about computers, put it in plain simple matter.

@ bjj51

You can overclock your cpu if your motherboard BIOS (F2 or DEL) on start has cpu ratio changes and places that you can configure the frequency (FSB, Base Clock).

600W will be enough for you, even a 500W will boot that.

You cannot damage your parts by going too low of a Power Supply, it will simply just not turn on. If it doesn't turn on, either the item you just bought came broken, or is not enough voltage to power up your system.
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November 3, 2011 4:50:55 AM

trihedral said:
^ lol!

True, you're confusing him bro, he barely knows anything about computers, put it in plain simple matter.

@ bjj51

You can overclock your cpu if your motherboard BIOS (F2 or DEL) on start has cpu ratio changes and places that you can configure the frequency (FSB, Base Clock).

600W will be enough for you, even a 500W will boot that.

You cannot damage your parts by going too low of a Power Supply, it will simply just not turn on. If it doesn't turn on, either the item you just bought came broken, or is not enough voltage to power up your system.


haha yes that is a fair assessment, I barely know anything about computers and that did confuse me.
I think I may be screwed either way now b/c the psu I have only has 2 PCIe 6 pin adapters and I need 4 right? Or is there a way I can get around that? I appreciate your guys' patience, I'm trying to gain some level of competence slowly but surely : )
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Best solution

a b ) Power supply
November 3, 2011 4:58:58 AM

Don't worry mate. We're here to help and argue with each other (constructively of course) in order to further our understanding of the ever evolving field of computers.

That corsair PSU is a good quality psu that can supply the needed power to 2x 6870s just fine. It is cutting it a tad too close for my liking so be sure to not overclock them for a bit of self assurance. If it was a TX or HX unit then i would say the skies the limit but this is from the "builder" series which is rated lower and contains lower quality parts (but still good quality) compared to the better TX/TXM/HX/AX lines.

Most gpu's come with molex -> 6pin pci-e connectors. If not, they're easy to find online.
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November 3, 2011 6:02:47 AM

use two of the PCI-E 6 Pin on one card, then use the adapter that came with the 2 cards for the second. It's basically a 6 pin that splits into 2 Peripherals.

You connect it to your power supply, then can the two cards will be fed the same amount of power.
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November 3, 2011 6:55:20 AM

Best answer selected by bjj51.
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