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Intel Tech support FAIL - any suggestions

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November 3, 2011 9:47:07 PM

Below is my failed conversation with Intel Tech support. Any suggestions on how to get this thing RMA'd? It seems their support is more interested in avoiding warranting their product than solving problems. Thoughts?


Brian: Hello. Thank you for using the Intel Customer Chat Support service. We are glad to be of service. How may I help you?
harooga: I have an I7 2600K on a Gigabyte H67 MB, intel video drive crashes on bootup. generic video driver works fine.
harooga: no discrete video
harooga: fresh os install
Brian: I am going to transfer you over to the technical department and they will continue with the process.
Brian: Please hold.
Please wait while I transfer the chat to the best suited site operator.
You are now chatting with 'Alvaro'
Alvaro: Hello. Thank you for using the Intel Customer Chat Support service. We are glad to be of service. How may I help you?
harooga: I have an I7 2600K on a Gigabyte H67 MB, intel video drive crashes on bootup. generic video driver works fine.
harooga: no discrete video fresh os install
Alvaro: What is the specific model number for the Gigabyte* motherboard?
harooga: on sec plz
harooga: GA-H67MA-UD2H-B3 LGA 1155
Alvaro: Do you receive any specific error code, beep or behavior?
harooga: no during bootup screen goes black. if you wait 15-20 mins you may get a blue screen indicating the driver.
harooga: windows logo displays for about3-5 seconds then goes black
Alvaro: Have you tested a different hard drive on the system?
harooga: no
harooga: though I have wiped the HD and re-installed
Alvaro: Thanks. If you unplugged the hard drive, and turn the system on. Is there any message received on the screen or any other behavior?
harooga: I am not on site. However replacing the driver removes all problems.
Alvaro: What is the specific driver from Intel(R) that you are updating?
harooga: I've tried three.
harooga: one from intel, one from Gigabyte, and one that MS windows auto updates. sec for version number
harooga: 15.22.5 on all
Alvaro: Is the generic driver from Windows working fine?
harooga: generic VGA driver yes, Intel HD driver from windows no
harooga: any HD specific driver fails, only generic VGA driver works, but works fine.
Alvaro: In this case our best recommendation is to uninstall the drivers and reinstall them from the original installation disc that came with the motherboard. Also, you can access the motherboard manufacturer website to verify for any newer driver version. Also, please bear in mind that Graphics may not be available on all computing systems. We recommend to contact the system or motherboard manufacturer for compatibility information.
harooga: I have done that.
harooga: Its a bad CPU and I'd like a warranty return please
Alvaro: As per this behavior, since the system is working fine with the generic driver it seems to be a wrong or corrupted driver. It may also be related to a compatibility issue. If the Processor is defective, we will not have any video at all and the system will not pass the POST test. Our best recommendation is try reloading the drivers in this case.
harooga: no, the system worked fine for 6 months, then failed. its not a MB compatibility issue. a clean OS install and driver install removes a corrupt driver problem. not all hardware failure is absolute. May I please have a RMA #
Alvaro: Unfortunately, we may need to complete all the troubleshooting required. As per this behavior we cannot confirm that the Processor is damaged and the issue does not seem to be related to the product. Also, we may need to confirm the version from the drivers, verified that the correct driver is updated in this case. As mentioned, as per this behavior and since the system is booting properly with a different driver, we cannot confirm that the Processor is damaged.
harooga: I'm sorry Alvaro but you're not reading what i've told you. I have tried the most current intel, gigabyte, and windows drivers. the version of those drivers is 15.22.5x.
Alvaro: Correct. As mentioned, the system is booting fine. Therefore, the issue is not related to the Processor but the drivers.
harooga: thats a false assumption. when loading the CPU specific drivers they fail, which can be caused by the hardware or the software. we've reinstalled the software driver many many times. that leaves the hardware
Alvaro: Have you tested the Processor on a different motherboard?
harooga: no
harooga: are you suggesting that a CPU with integrated video that cannot load its own driver is functioning normally?
Alvaro: In this case we may need to confirm on Device Manager the version for the drivers. This seems to be an issue related with those drivers. As per this behavior we may also recommend testing the Processor on a different motherboard.
harooga: 8.15.1 I believe was the version in DM.
harooga: 8.15.x
Alvaro: In this case, I can create a reference Service Ticket for this inquiry. My best recommendation is to confirm this information as soon as you have the system to follow these steps. Also, we would recommend to test the Processor on a different system.
harooga: What are you suggesting I do? update the drivers per your and intel's websites suggestion? I have done that. use the MB specific drivers. done that. your drivers do not work with this CPU. Why are you fighting the warranty return? does intel not support its customers or backup their warranty?
Alvaro: As per our warranty policies we may need to confirm that any Intel(R) product is defective. As per this behavior, we cannot confirm that the product is defective. That will be our best recommendation. Is there anything else that I can help you with?
harooga: yes, please give me a warranty return for your CPU that cannot load your drivers. there should be no further discussion than that.
harooga: Alvaro the cpu and driver combo worked fine for months. slowly got worse, and now wont work at all. reinstalling the driver does not help.
harooga: that's not software, thats hardware.
Alvaro: Sorry for the inconvenience. I already provide with the recommendations in this case. Since the system is booting properly the issue does not seem to be related to the Processor. Also, no troubleshooting has been performed because the system is not available. Therefore, are unable to set a replacement.
harooga: the troubleshooting you've asked for has already been done.
harooga: are you suggesting I should not use the latest drivers ?
harooga: or perhaps you are suggesting I should not use the MB drivers?
harooga: the CPU is NOT booting properly, it crashes.
harooga: unless the i7 only has a VGA video device.
harooga: VGA is 640x480 at 16 colors. and thats all this CPU will support, is that not a defective CPU?
harooga: please help me with an RMA or escalate the issue.
Alvaro: In this case, I can set the Service Ticket for this issue. However, our best recommendation is to contact us back as soon as the system is available. Also, we strongly recommend to test the Processor on a different motherboard.
harooga: You are not supporting your product, this processor comes with a 3 year warranty. You are putting up a defense wall that ignores everything I told you with glib remarks. Please issue an RMA or escalate the issue.
Alvaro: As mentioned, this the procedure we may need to follow. We cannot replace any Intel(R) product without following the process required. As per this behavior, we will recommend to test the Processor on a different motherboard first since we cannot confirm that it is defective.
harooga: Is the CPU crashing with any intel driver but not crashing with a generic vga drive not confirming?
Alvaro: Unfortunately, graphics may not be available on all computing systems. Based on that and the behavior on the system, we will recommend to test the Processor on a different motherboard.
harooga: Graphics were available for 6 months on an intel approved MB. so it is available on this computing system. so thats not an issue. May I please speak with a higher level of support or your supervisor.
Alvaro: This is the higher level for technical support. For sure, you can contact us at 916 377 7000 to continue the process. I can also escalate the case but it will be a non-technical supervisor.
harooga: please escalate the case to your non-technical supervisor as all deductive reasoning is being ignored in favor of not warranting this CPU.
Alvaro: Unfortunately, we cannot confirm that the Processor is defective. Let me complete your profile for the Service Ticket.
Alvaro: Can I have your telephone number and email address?
harooga: e-mail only is fine, I submitted it at the beginning of this chat session.
Alvaro: Sure. I will send the information. Supervisor will send an email notification tomorrow to continue the process.
harooga: Alvaro is it Intel's policy that consumers with retail box CPUs have to use secondary motherboards before getting an RMA warranty return?
Alvaro: It is part of the troubleshooting required based on the behavior.
harooga: so you are saying yes?
Alvaro: Let me give you the Service Ticket number for this inquiry.
harooga: wait. you submitted that I must test on a second motherboard as per intels troubleshooting policy. I'm seeking confirmation that is the process I must take to get an RMA. is it?
Alvaro: Correct. As per this behavior, we cannot confirm that the Processor is defective. It seems to be related to the driver or a compatibility issue with the motherboard and the HD feature. We need to complete the troubleshooting required before we can set a replacement order.
harooga: So Correct that a retail box CPU cannot be RMA'd without being tested on a secondary MB provided by the consumer?
Alvaro: As mentioned, this is the process we may need to follow.
harooga: is it the process or isn't it?
Alvaro: Your Service Ticket number for this inquiry is 8000341890. You will receive an email from the non-technical supervisor anytime tomorrow.
harooga: I want to know if I am required to use a secondary MB to get a RMA
Alvaro: Yes, it is required.
harooga: that is intel's policy then?
Alvaro: It is an Intel(R) technical support procedure.
harooga: are you sure its not what you came up with and are now stuck with?
harooga: I cant help but believe with everything I've told you that Intel would require such great lengths of its consumers.
Alvaro: Sorry for the inconvenience. This is the standard technical and replacement procedure for the Intel(R) products. Is there anything else that I can help you with?
harooga: do you have a higher level of support?
Alvaro: As mentioned, this is the higher level support.
harooga: higher is relative. is there a higher one?
Alvaro: Sir it seems that we are going in circles. As I mentioned, this is the higher level support. Since you have requested a supervisor, you will receive the email notification anytime tomorrow to complete the process. I will terminate this chat session to assist other customers. Thank you for using Intel Customer Chat Support. Have a nice day.
Chat session has been terminated by the site operator.
a b à CPUs
November 3, 2011 10:13:18 PM

What do you mean "generic driver works fine" then later say "no discrete video"?
Have you ever had a discrete video card? Go look into your BIOS to see if onboard video was disabled sometime in the past.
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November 3, 2011 10:13:44 PM

I would rma the motherboard and then contact Intel again after you've tried the new board. I had a similar issue on my motherboard and sent it in for replacement. My dvi port would only run at a low resolution and crash with windows bluescreens and static when trying to run it at the recommended windows detected setting for my monitor 1920 x 1080. It could be your board video port or other hardware issue. Cpus are pretty durable, unless you've tried overclocking or raised the voltage.
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November 3, 2011 11:04:33 PM

It doesn't sound to me like a mobo or CPU issue. It sounds like a driver issue.
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November 4, 2011 1:49:27 AM

beenthere said:
It doesn't sound to me like a mobo or CPU issue. It sounds like a driver issue.


I actually doubt its driver. I bet its either RAM or mobo. Remember the IGP uses system RAM and if the RAM is bad or does not have proper timings/voltage it will cause issues. The generic 7 driver does not allow for advanced features or higher resolutions.

The chances of a CPU being bad, especially a 2600K which is the highest binned SB part, is very very rare.

The OP should follow the advice of the Intel technician. I would do the same thing in a service at work because as I said, the chances of the CPU being bad are very slim and normally will cause a no post before causing BSoD.
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November 4, 2011 2:05:12 AM

jimmysmitty said:

The OP should follow the advice of the Intel technician.


The person he was talking to hardly seems to be a technician. His resonses repeat identically, indicating possible copy and paste. The english sentence structure is very very poor, full of weasel words (I cannot help you because we may need to follow this procedure blah blah) and it really sounds like the "technician" didn't understand what he was told. He also refused to confirm if the customer must buy a second motherboard to test the CPU before getting an RMA.

I think this chat log is disgusting. Full of "our best recommendation", "may need to", etc. It sounds like Intel went crazy cheap with some overseas technical support, is aware of the low level of service, and has taught them to paste in weasel expressions to deny liability if this ever gets before the BBB or some consumer protection authority in whatever state the customer is in or whatever. Really really sad.

Also, I almost puked on my keyboard with the whole "this is the higher level of technical support" thing. It's a euphemism for "you don't like my shitty attitude and want to talk to my boss? tough sh**, I AM the boss". Yea right, "Alvaro".
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November 4, 2011 2:52:32 AM

Appears to me that the OP was rather rude through a good bit of it. The recommendation of testing a processor on a second motherboard is actually a pretty common practice. Also appears that the OP simply expected Intel to provide an RMA without any actual proof of product failure which would easily be provided by simply following proper troubleshooting procedures. You can't simply install a driver from multiple sites (with the same driver version) and declare it a hardware problem because that same driver from 3 different sources provided the same results. Also, formatting and reinstalling Windows doesn't necessarily mean that the driver package isn't corrupt. Faulty memory can result in corrupt data, even when downloaded from multiple sources. I don't think it's too much to ask for the customer to prove a product is defective prior to replacing it. Seeing as how the CPU, Motherboard and Memory can all give the same results....the OP only proves his lack of knowledge in this case and provides absolutely no reason to get an RMA.
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November 4, 2011 3:12:55 AM

From what I understand there seems to be quite a bit of trouble with the Intel video drivers at the moment. So it is entirely possible that the issue is driver related.

I couldn't follow properly from the technical support chat, but did you try removing all drivers and re installing the ones which came with the motherboard CD. OR see if you can find an old version of the driver on intel website and install this. If your problems are fixed then its most likely a driver incompatibility with the latest drivers.

Another possibility is that the computer is outputting a resolution that the monitor cannot display when the driver loads. Before the computer shuts down when installing the new driver, ensure that the resolution is set to something within the range of the display, or try another display.

Finally, you could always spend $40 on a cheap discrete card and solve all your problems. At least you wouldn't be RMA a perfectly good CPU just because the integrated graphics might be gone lol.
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November 4, 2011 3:13:43 AM

sykozis said:
Appears to me that the OP was rather rude through a good bit of it. The recommendation of testing a processor on a second motherboard is actually a pretty common practice. Also appears that the OP simply expected Intel to provide an RMA without any actual proof of product failure which would easily be provided by simply following proper troubleshooting procedures. You can't simply install a driver from multiple sites (with the same driver version) and declare it a hardware problem because that same driver from 3 different sources provided the same results. Also, formatting and reinstalling Windows doesn't necessarily mean that the driver package isn't corrupt. Faulty memory can result in corrupt data, even when downloaded from multiple sources. I don't think it's too much to ask for the customer to prove a product is defective prior to replacing it. Seeing as how the CPU, Motherboard and Memory can all give the same results....the OP only proves his lack of knowledge in this case and provides absolutely no reason to get an RMA.


I agree 100%. The best thing he can do is stop thinking he knows better then Intel tech support and do what they recommend. Try the CPU on a different mobo and see what happens. They aren't going to just give you an RMA just because you think the CPU is messed up without any proof it was shipped broken.
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November 4, 2011 3:49:40 AM

jimmysmitty said:
I actually doubt its driver. I bet its either RAM or mobo. Remember the IGP uses system RAM and if the RAM is bad or does not have proper timings/voltage it will cause issues. The generic 7 driver does not allow for advanced features or higher resolutions.

The chances of a CPU being bad, especially a 2600K which is the highest binned SB part, is very very rare.

The OP should follow the advice of the Intel technician. I would do the same thing in a service at work because as I said, the chances of the CPU being bad are very slim and normally will cause a no post before causing BSoD.



IMO if it was the RAM the generic driver would not function properly either. It can't magically fix the RAM.
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November 4, 2011 4:36:40 AM

ukee1593 said:
From what I understand there seems to be quite a bit of trouble with the Intel video drivers at the moment. So it is entirely possible that the issue is driver related.

I couldn't follow properly from the technical support chat, but did you try removing all drivers and re installing the ones which came with the motherboard CD. OR see if you can find an old version of the driver on intel website and install this. If your problems are fixed then its most likely a driver incompatibility with the latest drivers.

Another possibility is that the computer is outputting a resolution that the monitor cannot display when the driver loads. Before the computer shuts down when installing the new driver, ensure that the resolution is set to something within the range of the display, or try another display.

Finally, you could always spend $40 on a cheap discrete card and solve all your problems. At least you wouldn't be RMA a perfectly good CPU just because the integrated graphics might be gone lol.


As a technician I can say that your first statement is wrong. I am the head tech at my work so besides services I also have the responsability of building, testing and updating drivers for all of our prebuilt systems. I have done plenty of Intel systems and AMD. We currently have an entire lineup of Sandy Bridge based systems from very basic to high end (H61 to Z68) and two LGA 1366 based systems.

I have never had any issues with Intels drivers. They may need some work performance wise, but stability and reliability they are very good. With the services, I install with a new OS install or update Intel based drivers very often. I have gotten some systems that will give similar issues but they tend to be older Intel chipsets with the IGP on the mobo which indicates a bad mobo.

In fact i just did a Intel Basic which is a H61 Asus mobo using a SB CPU and it has the latest Intel drivers (from September) with no issues at all.

As for the monitor if the OP is using 7, it will automatically detect and drop the res to the native of the plugged in monitor. When the new driver is installed, it will go to the native (max) monitor reolution. I have had plenty of people who use Eyefinity bring them in for service and it drops down to our basic 17" 4:3 1280x1024 resolution.

And if its a bad motherboard or RAM (or if the RAM timings/voltages are set improperly) then no a discrete GPU wont help. It will just allow for other BSoD issues or data corruption.

beenthere said:
IMO if it was the RAM the generic driver would not function properly either. It can't magically fix the RAM.


Thats not accurate. If the RAM on a GPU dies you can boot to Safe Mode, which loads the generic driver at normally 800x600 for 7 or 640x480 for XP, and it can load fine. but crank the resolution up and you can get artifacts or even worse. I had a 9700Pros VRA die on me. At 1280x1024 32bit, I got artifacts. At 1280x1024 16bit or lower resolutions, it looked fine.

The reason being is it needs less VRAM to load the generic driver since it does very low resolution. It could possibly be bypassing the bad part of the RAM at the lower resolution. Its like with Memtest 86+. It could do two passes and pass all 8 tests each time but on the third it could fail the 6th test because the 6th test does random settings.

I still think the OP is better off testing it in a different motherboard or taking his CPU to a PC shop to test it for him. As I said, chances of a bad CPU are almost 0%. At my work in about a year we had one from AMD. And we do plenty of sales for CPUs. I did 8 today and tomorrow I have 5 more plus any that come in that day.
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November 4, 2011 5:01:18 PM

DelroyMonjo said:
What do you mean "generic driver works fine" then later say "no discrete video"?
Have you ever had a discrete video card? Go look into your BIOS to see if onboard video was disabled sometime in the past.


on the i7 2600K the GPU is in the cpu, there is no MB video and no video adapter card.
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November 4, 2011 5:15:01 PM

rds1220 said:
I agree 100%. The best thing he can do is stop thinking he knows better then Intel tech support and do what they recommend. Try the CPU on a different mobo and see what happens. They aren't going to just give you an RMA just because you think the CPU is messed up without any proof it was shipped broken.


I appreciate your input. My combative conversation was spurred by the glib response that the driver is the issue, when Intel is the provider of the CPU/GPU (integrated) and the driver; and that the driver had worked fine for months, and than began to fail. This appears to be hardware to me once the driver has been cleaned and re-installed.

For further background I tried and older driver, and I tried different ram, I tried higher ram voltage. As a CS engineer I write device drivers, and I understand how drivers interact with hardware. You can have a particular feature that when exercised causes failure but when not used, (as in the case of a generic driver) the hardware performs normally with this subset of functionality.

I will try replacing the MB but may try a different but identical CPU in this MB configuration as is. That seems to be a better test. I will post results for anybody interested. Thank you for your input.

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November 6, 2011 3:39:21 PM

Jammor said:
I appreciate your input. My combative conversation was spurred by the glib response that the driver is the issue, when Intel is the provider of the CPU/GPU (integrated) and the driver; and that the driver had worked fine for months, and than began to fail. This appears to be hardware to me once the driver has been cleaned and re-installed.

For further background I tried and older driver, and I tried different ram, I tried higher ram voltage. As a CS engineer I write device drivers, and I understand how drivers interact with hardware. You can have a particular feature that when exercised causes failure but when not used, (as in the case of a generic driver) the hardware performs normally with this subset of functionality.

I will try replacing the MB but may try a different but identical CPU in this MB configuration as is. That seems to be a better test. I will post results for anybody interested. Thank you for your input.


Actually testing the CPU in a new mobo is a better test.

And if it was working for a while then it points to hardware, most likley is the motherboard as CPUs almost never die. Hell I dropped on we use for a display at work on the floor, hard concrete, and it still works perfectly fine. Killing a CPU is very hard to do these days and I doubt that it just died.

I bet your motherboard died. I see it all the time. Motherboards have a better chance of going out than does a CPU. Hell you could probably go through 10 bad motherboards before you hit one bad CPU.
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November 6, 2011 10:47:02 PM

Jammor said:
I appreciate your input. My combative conversation was spurred by the glib response that the driver is the issue, when Intel is the provider of the CPU/GPU (integrated) and the driver; and that the driver had worked fine for months, and than began to fail. This appears to be hardware to me once the driver has been cleaned and re-installed.

For further background I tried and older driver, and I tried different ram, I tried higher ram voltage. As a CS engineer I write device drivers, and I understand how drivers interact with hardware. You can have a particular feature that when exercised causes failure but when not used, (as in the case of a generic driver) the hardware performs normally with this subset of functionality.

I will try replacing the MB but may try a different but identical CPU in this MB configuration as is. That seems to be a better test. I will post results for anybody interested. Thank you for your input.


Let me run a scenario by you, since you still appear to think you know everything.

In 2004 I built a new system. AMD AthlonXP 2600+, Gigabyte KT400A, 2GB Kingston DDR-800, 160gb WD, Sony Optiarc 16x DVD-Rom, ATI Radeon 9200SE. I installed drivers provided by the hardware manufacturers to get the system up and running. I chose to download the latest ATI driver from their website and chipset drivers from Gigabyte's website. After the downloads completed, I proceeded to install the ATI drivers. After reboot, the system immediately experienced a BSOD. I booted into safe mode and removed the drivers. Rebooted into Windows, downloaded the same driver again. After installation completed, I rebooted the system just to be met against with a BSOD. So, I formatted the system and reloaded everything. After the first boot to desktop, I downloaded the graphics driver from Visiontek's website. After install, it immediately BSOD'd at boot. At this point I'm thinking the graphics card is bad, so I remove the card and proceed to the retailer it was purchased from for exchange. I get home and install the new card, just to be met with BSOD's at boot again.

Now, before I continue this, keep something in mind. When you download files, they pass through ram prior to be written to the harddrive, as well as being placed in RAM when the installer is run. Ok, back to the story now.

After several more BSOD's, I decide it's time to run my typical burn-In and memory tests prior to continuing with the graphics drivers. The system passes the burn-in test with no errors. Memtest86, not so lucky. Since the memory failed Memtest86, it was decided to RMA the set. After replacing the memory, I made another attempt at installing the graphics driver. Problem solved.

Point of all this text? Since data has to pass-through the IMC, memory, harddrive and CPU....any of those parts can potentially cause a problem. You can't diagnose a hardware failure based on it's driver causing BSOD's. Claiming to know how to write drivers and how they work, doesn't mean you actually know anything about how the underlying hardware actually works, nor about how other companies's hardware works.
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a c 151 à CPUs
a b å Intel
November 7, 2011 12:02:45 AM

so the OP call technical support when they are not at the system and therefor cannot run thru their 'canned' diagnostics to determine the fault and still expects an RMA?

I dont mean to be rude but what did you think would happen? not your brightest moment...
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November 7, 2011 3:38:53 AM

sykozis said:
Let me run a scenario by you, since you still appear to think you know everything.

In 2004 I built a new system. AMD AthlonXP 2600+, Gigabyte KT400A, 2GB Kingston DDR-800, 160gb WD, Sony Optiarc 16x DVD-Rom, ATI Radeon 9200SE. I installed drivers provided by the hardware manufacturers to get the system up and running. I chose to download the latest ATI driver from their website and chipset drivers from Gigabyte's website. After the downloads completed, I proceeded to install the ATI drivers. After reboot, the system immediately experienced a BSOD. I booted into safe mode and removed the drivers. Rebooted into Windows, downloaded the same driver again. After installation completed, I rebooted the system just to be met against with a BSOD. So, I formatted the system and reloaded everything. After the first boot to desktop, I downloaded the graphics driver from Visiontek's website. After install, it immediately BSOD'd at boot. At this point I'm thinking the graphics card is bad, so I remove the card and proceed to the retailer it was purchased from for exchange. I get home and install the new card, just to be met with BSOD's at boot again.

Now, before I continue this, keep something in mind. When you download files, they pass through ram prior to be written to the harddrive, as well as being placed in RAM when the installer is run. Ok, back to the story now.

After several more BSOD's, I decide it's time to run my typical burn-In and memory tests prior to continuing with the graphics drivers. The system passes the burn-in test with no errors. Memtest86, not so lucky. Since the memory failed Memtest86, it was decided to RMA the set. After replacing the memory, I made another attempt at installing the graphics driver. Problem solved.

Point of all this text? Since data has to pass-through the IMC, memory, harddrive and CPU....any of those parts can potentially cause a problem. You can't diagnose a hardware failure based on it's driver causing BSOD's. Claiming to know how to write drivers and how they work, doesn't mean you actually know anything about how the underlying hardware actually works, nor about how other companies's hardware works.


Nice example. People don't understand how bad memory, or a bad mobo, can cause data corruption. Even if it doesn't, the drivers are still loaded into memory and if they happen to present the scenario that would cause memory to fail Memtest 86+, you will get BSoD.

In my entire time of building PCs, I have never had a bad CPU. I have seen one at work in a year and trust me, we sell a ton of CPUs in builds and to people. The chances of a bad CPU are very small compared to bad RAM or bad mobos.
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November 9, 2011 10:33:45 PM

I've had CPUs fail....but there were always outside influences involved. If you use quality components and some care during assembly, the chances of a CPU failing on it's own are pretty low.
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a b à CPUs
November 9, 2011 11:38:43 PM

Did you buy the stuff from Intel directly?
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