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Cat 5 eithernet to wireless

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Anonymous
a b F Wireless
a b D Laptop
August 6, 2005 9:58:13 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

hi all still searching for wireless options for my old laptop, anybody
know of a non "cardbus" usb adapter? I really have looked everywhere I
can think of, is there a site somewhere with pcmcia card reviews?

More about : cat eithernet wireless

Anonymous
a b F Wireless
a b D Laptop
August 7, 2005 1:41:13 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

rickj123456789@yahoo.com wrote:
> hi all still searching for wireless options for my old laptop, anybody
> know of a non "cardbus" usb adapter? I really have looked everywhere I
> can think of, is there a site somewhere with pcmcia card reviews?
>

How about a USB WiFi adapter?
Related resources
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
a b D Laptop
August 7, 2005 4:17:26 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

rickj123456789@yahoo.com wrote:
> hi all still searching for wireless options for my old laptop, anybody
> know of a non "cardbus" usb adapter? I really have looked everywhere
> I can think of, is there a site somewhere with pcmcia card reviews?

Google: 16 bit pcmcia wireless for many references.

Q
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
a b D Laptop
August 7, 2005 7:00:03 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

timeOday wrote:
> rickj123456789@yahoo.com wrote:
>> hi all still searching for wireless options for my old laptop,
>> anybody know of a non "cardbus" usb adapter? I really have looked
>> everywhere I can think of, is there a site somewhere with pcmcia
>> card reviews?
>
> How about a USB WiFi adapter?

A non-Cardbus machine, by definition, can't possibly have a USB port.

For the OP, check eBay for Orinoco "Gold" cards, many of the older ones will
be 16BIT (non-Cardbus) cards.

Regards,

James
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
a b D Laptop
August 8, 2005 1:34:38 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

JHEM wrote:

> timeOday wrote:
>> rickj123456789@yahoo.com wrote:
>>> hi all still searching for wireless options for my old laptop,
>>> anybody know of a non "cardbus" usb adapter? I really have looked
>>> everywhere I can think of, is there a site somewhere with pcmcia
>>> card reviews?
>>
>> How about a USB WiFi adapter?
>
> A non-Cardbus machine, by definition, can't possibly have a USB port.

Huh? USB has nothing to do with cardbus.

> For the OP, check eBay for Orinoco "Gold" cards, many of the older ones
> will be 16BIT (non-Cardbus) cards.
>
> Regards,
>
> James

--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
a b D Laptop
August 8, 2005 10:14:08 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

J. Clarke wrote:
> JHEM wrote:
>
>> A non-Cardbus machine, by definition, can't possibly have a USB port.
>
> Huh? USB has nothing to do with cardbus.

Didn't say it did John, I just noted that a non-Cardbus/32BIT (PCI) enabled
laptop can't possibly have a USB port. If the OP's laptop is so old that it
doesn't support a Cardbus WiFi card, then it's highly unlikely to have a USB
port.

There's no such animal as a 16BIT (ISA) machine with a USB port, desktop or
laptop.

Regards,

James
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
a b D Laptop
August 9, 2005 4:07:26 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

JHEM wrote:

> J. Clarke wrote:
>> JHEM wrote:
>>
>>> A non-Cardbus machine, by definition, can't possibly have a USB port.
>>
>> Huh? USB has nothing to do with cardbus.

Well, actually you did when you said that such a thing was "impossible".

Maybe nobody makes one but that doesn't make it "impossible", just
"unobtainable".

> Didn't say it did John, I just noted that a non-Cardbus/32BIT (PCI)
> enabled laptop can't possibly have a USB port.

Maybe nobody made one but that does not mean it's "impossible".

> If the OP's laptop is so
> old that it doesn't support a Cardbus WiFi card, then it's highly unlikely
> to have a USB port.
>
> There's no such animal as a 16BIT (ISA) machine with a USB port, desktop
> or laptop.

For certain values of "ISA machine". There are certainly machines available
with ISA slots and USB ports.

> Regards,
>
> James

--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
a b D Laptop
August 9, 2005 6:13:50 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

A "non cardbus USB adapter" ????

"Cardbus" applies only to PC Card adapters. It doesn't apply in any
sense whatsoever to any USB adapters.


rickj123456789@yahoo.com wrote:
> hi all still searching for wireless options for my old laptop, anybody
> know of a non "cardbus" usb adapter? I really have looked everywhere I
> can think of, is there a site somewhere with pcmcia card reviews?
>
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
a b D Laptop
August 9, 2005 6:17:45 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

While I think that your statement is generally correct as a practical
matter, it would be at least theoretically possible to have only 16-bit
(ISA) PC Card slots in a laptop whose internal architecture included PCI
and that had a USB port, and I have a feeling that someone probably
(stupidly, I agree) built such a machine in the 1996-1998 time frame.


JHEM wrote:

> J. Clarke wrote:
>
>>JHEM wrote:
>>
>>
>>>A non-Cardbus machine, by definition, can't possibly have a USB port.
>>
>>Huh? USB has nothing to do with cardbus.
>
>
> Didn't say it did John, I just noted that a non-Cardbus/32BIT (PCI) enabled
> laptop can't possibly have a USB port. If the OP's laptop is so old that it
> doesn't support a Cardbus WiFi card, then it's highly unlikely to have a USB
> port.
>
> There's no such animal as a 16BIT (ISA) machine with a USB port, desktop or
> laptop.
>
> Regards,
>
> James
>
>
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
a b D Laptop
August 9, 2005 7:56:53 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Hi Barry,

Barry Watzman wrote:
>
> rickj123456789@yahoo.com wrote:
>> hi all still searching for wireless options for my old laptop,
>> anybody know of a non "cardbus" usb adapter? I really have looked
>> everywhere I can think of, is there a site somewhere with pcmcia
>> card reviews?
>
> A "non cardbus USB adapter" ????
>
> "Cardbus" applies only to PC Card adapters. It doesn't apply in any
> sense whatsoever to any USB adapters.

The OP is searching for a non-Cardbus PC Card (PCMCIA) to USB adapter which,
as we both know, doesn't exist.

Regards,

James
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
a b D Laptop
August 10, 2005 5:15:54 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

J. Clarke wrote:
> JHEM wrote:
>>
>> Didn't say it did John, I just noted that a non-Cardbus/32BIT (PCI)
>> enabled laptop can't possibly have a USB port.
>
> Well, actually you did when you said that such a thing was
> "impossible".
>
> Maybe nobody makes one but that doesn't make it "impossible", just
> "unobtainable".

You're being unnecessarily obtuse John. A 16BIT ISA _only_ machine cannot
possibly have a USB port as USB is 32BIT technology.

>> There's no such animal as a 16BIT (ISA) machine with a USB port,
>> desktop or laptop.
>
> For certain values of "ISA machine". There are certainly machines
> available with ISA slots and USB ports.

They would, of necessity, have PCI slots in addition to ISA and USB. The
mere fact that a machine has an ISA slot doesn't mean it isn't PCi (32BIT)
capable.

But my point is that an older, non-Cardbus laptop is quite possibly an ISA
only machine without _any_ PCI ports and therefore without an ability to
have a USB port.

I stand by my original statement that an ISA only (16BIT) machine cannot
have a USB port.

Regards,

James
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
a b D Laptop
August 10, 2005 5:15:54 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Barry Watzman wrote:
> While I think that your statement is generally correct as a practical
> matter, it would be at least theoretically possible to have only
> 16-bit (ISA) PC Card slots in a laptop whose internal architecture
> included PCI and that had a USB port, and I have a feeling that
> someone probably (stupidly, I agree) built such a machine in the
> 1996-1998 time frame.

Never heard of such a thing, but you could well be right.

Regards,

James
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
a b D Laptop
August 10, 2005 5:30:40 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

JHEM wrote:

> J. Clarke wrote:
>> JHEM wrote:
>>>
>>> Didn't say it did John, I just noted that a non-Cardbus/32BIT (PCI)
>>> enabled laptop can't possibly have a USB port.
>>
>> Well, actually you did when you said that such a thing was
>> "impossible".
>>
>> Maybe nobody makes one but that doesn't make it "impossible", just
>> "unobtainable".
>
> You're being unnecessarily obtuse John. A 16BIT ISA _only_ machine cannot
> possibly have a USB port as USB is 32BIT technology.

I realize that it is fashionable in the schools today to neglect to address
the difference between one's opinion and what is true.

USB is not a "32-bit technology". USB is ONE bit technology. It's serial.
You understand "serial"? One bit at a time goes down a wire?

>>> There's no such animal as a 16BIT (ISA) machine with a USB port,
>>> desktop or laptop.
>>
>> For certain values of "ISA machine". There are certainly machines
>> available with ISA slots and USB ports.
>
> They would, of necessity, have PCI slots in addition to ISA and USB. The
> mere fact that a machine has an ISA slot doesn't mean it isn't PCi (32BIT)
> capable.

Uh, there were plenty of machines with 32 bit processors before PCI came
into existence.
>
> But my point is that an older, non-Cardbus laptop is quite possibly an ISA
> only machine without _any_ PCI ports and therefore without an ability to
> have a USB port.
>
> I stand by my original statement that an ISA only (16BIT) machine cannot
> have a USB port.

There are certainly USB chips with 16-bit interfaces.
<http://shop.store.yahoo.com/plxtech/net2272.html&gt;
<http://www.ftdichip.com/Projects/MPSSE/FT2232C-Proj04.p...;

A couple of ISA boards have been on the market at one time or another. One
is <http://www.simtec.co.uk/products/EB1161ISA/&gt;.

Sorry, but your argument falls completely flat.

The fact that something is not done or is seldom done doesn't mean that it
cannot be done.

--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
a b D Laptop
August 11, 2005 10:28:35 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

While USB is, in a sense, a one-bit technology, as implemented in a PC,
a USB controller absolutely requires PCI and Plug-and-play. You cannot
have a USB port in a PC that, internally, has only an ISA (16-bit)
controller (CPU chipset).

The reasons are too complex to go into, and I won't argue that USB can
be implemented in low-end devices that are not even PC's. However, in
order to work in a PC with a PC operating system (Windows or Linux), the
USB controller needs capabilities that didn't exist in pre-PCI systems
(including fully implmented plug-and-play). The issue isn't USB per se,
but rather how USB controllers in PCs are imlemented, and how the
standards for a USB controller, Plug-and-Play, the PCI bus, the USB
interface to the operating systems (even non-Microsoft OS') and the
computer's BIOS' have been developed. The bottom line for a PC is,
correctly, no PCI, no USB.

However, the presence of a PCI architecture is at least theoretically
distinct from the question of whether a laptop's PC Card slots are
16-bit or 32-bit (Cardbus). One could build a PCI architecture laptop
with only 16-bit PC Card slots. It would be seem, today, to have been
an extremely stupid and short-sighted thing to have done, but I would
not be surprised if, back in 1997 or so, someone stupidly did it.




J. Clarke wrote:

> JHEM wrote:
>
>
>>J. Clarke wrote:
>>
>>>JHEM wrote:
>>>
>
> I realize that it is fashionable in the schools today to neglect to address
> the difference between one's opinion and what is true.
>
> USB is not a "32-bit technology". USB is ONE bit technology. It's serial.
> You understand "serial"? One bit at a time goes down a wire?
>
>
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
a b D Laptop
August 12, 2005 1:24:35 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Barry Watzman wrote:

> While USB is, in a sense, a one-bit technology, as implemented in a PC,
> a USB controller absolutely requires PCI and Plug-and-play. You cannot
> have a USB port in a PC that, internally, has only an ISA (16-bit)
> controller (CPU chipset).
>
> The reasons are too complex to go into, and I won't argue that USB can
> be implemented in low-end devices that are not even PC's. However, in
> order to work in a PC with a PC operating system (Windows or Linux), the
> USB controller needs capabilities that didn't exist in pre-PCI systems
> (including fully implmented plug-and-play). The issue isn't USB per se,
> but rather how USB controllers in PCs are imlemented, and how the
> standards for a USB controller, Plug-and-Play, the PCI bus, the USB
> interface to the operating systems (even non-Microsoft OS') and the
> computer's BIOS' have been developed. The bottom line for a PC is,
> correctly, no PCI, no USB.

Phillips Semiconductor seems to be laboring under the misconception that
their 1160 and 1161 chips allow USB devices to be connected to PCS via an
ISA slot under Linux Kernel 2.4. They also seem to believe that they are
selling an evaluation kit which includes such an interface and the
necessary drivers and that it does in fact allow USB devices to be so
connected.

Perhaps you might want to contact them and inform them of their error.

--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
a b D Laptop
August 16, 2005 12:05:26 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

No usb on the 530t Fujitsu, the orinco gold card is awsome even comes
with an external antenna for my cantenna, wardrivin here we come.
!