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Xbox Live, or lack of.

Last response: in Networking
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October 6, 2010 9:31:13 PM

So, I have a Xbox 360 & Live account. It's worked perfectly yadda yadda. some time over the summer, lightning from a storm, as I assume it was, blew a fuse in my house and knocked out our internet, our phones, and completely fried my computer tower.

Since then everything's been fixed. phones are up, computers running, internet is as smooth as a baby's bottom. we got a new router a couple months ago, though. anyways, i can get onto xbox, but not live. the ethernet cord is connected to the router, which is connected to the modem. internet on the computer works perfect, but when i try to connect to live, it doesn't recognize a network at all. usually it automatically detects the IP and such, but it's been coming up blank. i'm not computer wiz, but even i know it's a bit off.

it can't be the internet, since that works for my computer. it can't be the router because i literally just bought a new one today. is the xbox fried, though i can still play offline perfectly well? could it be because that storm during the summer? i haven't been able to get on live since then, even though everything else is peaches. i literally can not understand for the life of me why it isn't working. i've even tried bridging it to two separate laptops. could it be the xbox itself? when i perform the connection test provided on the dashboard, it can't connect to a network at all, a network isn't even identified. confuses me, because it's clearly connected to the router, which is less than ten feet away.

it's driving me crazy, and help would be greatly appreciated before i do something drastic like throw it out of a window or run it over in my car.

More about : xbox live lack

October 6, 2010 11:01:36 PM

If the xbox is working fine except for live (online) access, then in all likelihood the ports needed by xbox live are just blocked by the router’s firewall.

You have three options. Enable UPnP (Universal Plug and Play) on the router (the easiest solution), manually open and forward the ports on the router’s firewall (a little tricky for networking novices, see PortForward.com), or place the xbox’s local IP address in the DMZ of the router (not as simple as UPnP, but easier than manual port forwarding). For the last two options, it’s best to assign a static IP to the xbox, or else reserve an IP address for the xbox w/ the router’s DHCP server (you don’t want the xbox IP address suddenly changing).
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