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CPU idle at 140 F/60 C...?

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November 17, 2011 6:08:19 PM

I went into my BIOS upon getting home today, just turned on the computer. Was checking what my fans are set at and the minimum speeds they are set at by default...

I decided to head over to temps, and the BIOS tells me that the CPU heat is at 140F/60C... How is that possible.... The computer hasnt even been on for over 5 minutes, and the temperature in the room is 78 F, how does it get to 140/60???

On top of that, it says my MB temp is at 93 F/34 C. Is it just plain wrong or can my CPU really go up to 140 from just turning the computer on...

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a b à CPUs
November 17, 2011 6:12:58 PM

Yes, it can if there's a problem with your cooling setup.
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November 17, 2011 6:19:17 PM

Ok, so it's normal for something to increase 70 degrees in Fahrenheit within less than a minute? Can a car even do that at idle?
This is unbelievable, when I saw these numbers the computer had only been on for 30 seconds or less
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November 17, 2011 6:20:56 PM

I stuck my hand in there just now, it isn't hot, it feels about the same temperature as the air around me, i'm downloading some kind of program or something to check this.
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a c 190 à CPUs
November 17, 2011 6:22:52 PM

Download and run HWMonitor and if you are still getting high temperatures you are going to want to check that your HSF (heatsink/fan) is properly seated. If it is a stock Intel® HSF you can just reach down and grab each one of the twist clips in the 4 corner and pull straight up. If you can pull any of them then it wasnt seated right. Get some new thermal paste, clean the old stuff off and reseat the HSF.

Christian Wood
Intel Enthusiast Team
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a b à CPUs
November 17, 2011 6:30:07 PM

The temperature inside a computer part is a lot by default. 60C isn't unheard of for some models.

I think mine is usually about 50c and it isn't a best of the best CPU either.

Others with more power could easily start at 60c.

My cooling situation (sides of the case are off) in my experience reduces CPU temperatures so mine may even break 50c with the sides on if I tried it.

Computer parts are built for this sort of thing though.

Graphics cards can approach 90c without melting parts and can sometimes reach 120c before they melt parts. That is really high.

They are just made that way.

I wouldn't worry too much about 60c.

It isn't even close to optimal, but its not the danger zone either, at least it shouldn't be.

I don't know your specific parts so I can't do a quick search about your specific CPU and see what it usually runs at.
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November 17, 2011 6:31:16 PM

HWMonitor says my cpu is idling at 100, not nearly as high as 140 but still pretty hot...
It was all just put in 2 days ago... You can barely call the old paste old, and there hasnt been any dust build up yet.

I'll check how it's seated, but other than that, what can i do?
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November 17, 2011 6:32:43 PM

Running with an i5 2500k, geforce gtx 560Ti, and sabertooth p67 mobo.
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a c 172 à CPUs
November 17, 2011 6:37:57 PM

60 C is high for an idle temperature. I do not think idle temps should be more than 10 - 15 C above ambient temps.
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November 17, 2011 6:40:47 PM

ambient is 80 F, it's at 100F idle. 8% load max. right now.
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a b à CPUs
November 17, 2011 6:44:58 PM

It might sound unbelievable but an i5 die is 216 mm^2 which is 0.000216 m^2. It has a TDP of 95 W at stock clocks/voltage.

95 W / 0.000216 m^2 = about 440,000 Watts / m^2.
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a b à CPUs
November 17, 2011 7:11:33 PM

I read somewhere that the 2500k can get up to 108c before it melts. 60c is still far away from that.

It would be good to be as far away from that as possible, but you are barely halfway there so I would say its fine.
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November 17, 2011 10:29:13 PM

Best answer selected by tusakano.
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