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Corsair HX850 enough for 570s in SLI?

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November 22, 2011 2:57:58 PM

I wanted to get the HX1050, but I could save $40 with the HX850... would that be enough for SLI 570s?

More about : corsair hx850 570s sli

a b ) Power supply
November 22, 2011 3:53:06 PM

Yes, it would.
November 22, 2011 4:52:05 PM

NO it wouldn't unless you only run the 2 video cards and I doubt that would even work. My 2X GTX480's in SLI can hit 850 watts on their own when overclocked. It just depends on what you are doing with them. Also if you run that power supply and do anything like extended gaming the fan in the PSU could get quite loud. I wouldn't recommend anything that close to the limits for power.
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a b ) Power supply
November 22, 2011 5:34:55 PM

480 != 570 ;) 
a c 1098 ) Power supply
November 22, 2011 5:47:57 PM

For a system running with two GeForce GTX 570 graphics cards in 2-way SLI mode NVIDIA specifies a minimum 800 Watt or greater power supply with a combined +12 Volt continuous current rating of 56 Amps or greater and with at least four 6-pin PCI-Express Supplementary Power Connectors should be used.

The Corsair Professional Series HX850W PSU, with its +12 Volt continuous current rating of 70 Amps and four PCI-Express Supplementary Power Connectors is more than sufficient.

It's not the PSU's total wattage that determines whether or not the PSU is capable. Always look at the PSU's combined +12 Volt continuous current rating as that is the most important specification followed by the PSU's DC Output Quality.
a b ) Power supply
November 22, 2011 8:07:46 PM

ahnilated said:
NO it wouldn't unless you only run the 2 video cards and I doubt that would even work. My 2X GTX480's in SLI can hit 850 watts on their own when overclocked. It just depends on what you are doing with them. Also if you run that power supply and do anything like extended gaming the fan in the PSU could get quite loud. I wouldn't recommend anything that close to the limits for power.

Do you really think that each of your cards consumes an extra 170w because they're OC'd? How have you measured this?
a b ) Power supply
November 22, 2011 8:22:02 PM

the 850 will be fine as long as you dont overclock much. you can save 30 bucks by going with the xfx 850 black edition fwiw.
a b ) Power supply
November 22, 2011 9:20:21 PM

+1, even if the OP will OC each nail in the PC the 850W is plenty.
a b ) Power supply
November 22, 2011 9:23:34 PM

plenty of power, the OP will be fine with the 850w PSU
November 22, 2011 9:56:04 PM

I'm actually surprised more people aren't suggesting 1000w PSUs. Not because he'd need one, just because people way over-estimate power requirements. For me, it's easier to think of in terms of amps first. It's a 219w GPU, so it needs 19a (rounding up). A 95w CPU needs 8a. 19a + 19a + 8a = 46a. So it needs 46a (or 550w) on the 12v rail. The other parts don't need 12v power, so you can just add the wattage to keep it simple. mobo (50w) + ram (10w for 2 sticks) + hdd (10w) + dvd (10w) + fans (10w each) means the rest of your parts uses ~100w. Then you add ~100w to account for headroom (so your psu isn't running at max power) and overclocking room. And that accounts for all the parts running at max usage at the same time, which simply won't ever happen. I would be comfortable running a sandy bridge cpu with sli 570s on a decent 750w psu. 850w should be plenty.
November 23, 2011 12:44:12 AM

Thanks for the info guys... I really wanted to stay modular... but I can't turn down this psu at this price. $100 cheaper than the HX1050

PC Power and Cooling Silencer Mk II 950W High Performance 80PLUS Silver SLI CrossFire ready Power Supply
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
November 23, 2011 1:16:23 PM

Mousemonkey said:
Do you really think that each of your cards consumes an extra 170w because they're OC'd? How have you measured this?


I have measured it with my meter that sits on the computer and tells me the wattage used by the system. Then the rest is easy to figure out.
November 23, 2011 1:19:21 PM

JrFreak said:
Thanks for the info guys... I really wanted to stay modular... but I can't turn down this psu at this price. $100 cheaper than the HX1050

PC Power and Cooling Silencer Mk II 950W High Performance 80PLUS Silver SLI CrossFire ready Power Supply
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


Well if your system starts having problems after say 1 yr of service and degradation you know what you will have to fix. PSU's are the part of a computer I would always spend more money on to make sure it will power everything for 5 yrs.
a b ) Power supply
November 23, 2011 1:43:37 PM

ahnilated said:
I have measured it with my meter that sits on the computer and tells me the wattage used by the system. Then the rest is easy to figure out.

Well that's not the cards alone then is it?
November 23, 2011 3:02:28 PM

I have a Seasonic M12D 850W that powers my 2 EVGA GTX 570 Superclocked editions along with an i7 920 OC'ed to 4.0 Ghz. I think you would probably be fine. I game a lot at 5760x1080 too, so my cards are under maximum load a lot of the time.
November 23, 2011 5:36:15 PM

Mousemonkey said:
Well that's not the cards alone then is it?


I take it you don't know how to figure out what a processor and motherboard use for power and then what the video cards do. NM, I am not going to waste my time with you or this discussion anymore.
a b ) Power supply
November 23, 2011 5:50:47 PM

ahnilated said:
I take it you don't know how to figure out what a processor and motherboard use for power and then what the video cards do. NM, I am not going to waste my time with you or this discussion anymore.


you do realize you are the only one who thinks the HX won't power that set up? looks like your posts and incorrect opinions waste more people's time then this discussion.
a b ) Power supply
November 23, 2011 5:54:45 PM

ahnilated said:
I take it you don't know how to figure out what a processor and motherboard use for power and then what the video cards do.

I reckon I have a better idea than you do! :lol: 
November 23, 2011 6:35:39 PM

dirtyferret said:
you do realize you are the only one who thinks the HX won't power that set up? looks like your posts and incorrect opinions waste more people's time then this discussion.


Actually after building PC's for 30 yrs I have a very good idea what it takes to run a PC for 5 yrs at 24/7/365. If you read about power supplies and what they can do at the initial fire up compared to after 5 yrs of use you will see what I am talking about. If you don't plan on using the system for at least 3yrs before buy something new have at it, get whatever power supply works.

I on the other hand like to know that my systems will run 24/7/365 and do without dieing from a weak part. My normal computers crunch Seti during the time when I am not using them and rarely get a break other then a cleaning every 3 months. I also go far beyond what other people do for stability testing when doing overclocking.
November 23, 2011 6:42:24 PM

Buy a Seasonic with a 5 year warranty and be done with it.
November 23, 2011 7:33:46 PM

popatim said:
the 850 will be fine as long as you dont overclock much. you can save 30 bucks by going with the xfx 850 black edition fwiw.



i have seen in some reviews that a xfx psu (silver) can pop with a big bang! (smoke & little fires) now i would not tell any one to buy.
a c 1098 ) Power supply
November 23, 2011 7:37:17 PM

robin banks uk said:
i have seen in some reviews that a xfx psu (silver) can pop with a big bang! (smoke & little fires) now i would not tell any one to buy.

Where's the links to those reviews?
November 23, 2011 9:20:42 PM

thebski said:
Buy a Seasonic with a 5 year warranty and be done with it.


The PC Power and Cooling 950W silver I posted above has a 7 year warranty.
November 23, 2011 10:13:37 PM

JrFreak said:
The PC Power and Cooling 950W silver I posted above has a 7 year warranty.


Well, I don't know much about PC Power and Cooling power supplies, but I do know that you pay for what you get when it comes to power supplies. I would never buy anything but the best when it comes to power supplies because you have $1000's of equpiment behind it.

In my opinion the best is Seasonic when it comes to quality and power output. Others will tell you Corsair, Cooler Master, etc. Just do the research on whichever model you buy and I'm sure you'll be fine. The only reason I made the 5 year warranty remark is because you can run it every hour you want for 5 years like the guy above was saying as long as it has a 5 year (or longer) warranty.
November 23, 2011 11:09:06 PM

The reviews for the PC Power are pretty darn good...
a c 1098 ) Power supply
November 24, 2011 12:03:16 AM

JrFreak said:
The reviews for the PC Power are pretty darn good...

What reviews are you reading? Did these reviewers hook up the power supply unit to a hot box, load tester and oscilloscope? If they didn't, then they don't have any empirical data to back up what they say, then it's only an opinion not a review.

The two reputable reviews on the PC Power & Cooling Silencer MkII 950W PSU that I've read say that this PSU has mediocre AC ripple and noise suppression.
November 24, 2011 12:23:51 AM

JrFreak said:
The reviews for the PC Power are pretty darn good...


Didn't say they weren't. Just that I don't know much about them.
November 24, 2011 10:19:21 AM

thebski said:
Didn't say they weren't. Just that I don't know much about them.


I read SeaSonic makes the psu's for Corsair? That true?
a b ) Power supply
November 24, 2011 11:29:40 AM

JrFreak said:
I read SeaSonic makes the psu's for Corsair? That true?

For some of them, yes.
November 24, 2011 5:17:48 PM

yyk71200 said:
Quote from Guru3D: You need a 750+ Watt power supply unit if you use it in a high-end system (800+ to a KiloWatt is recommended if you plan on any overclocking).

http://www.guru3d.com/article/geforce-gtx-570-sli-revie...


hapkido said:
I'm actually surprised more people aren't suggesting 1000w PSUs. Not because he'd need one, just because people way over-estimate power requirements. For me, it's easier to think of in terms of amps first. It's a 219w GPU, so it needs 19a (rounding up). A 95w CPU needs 8a. 19a + 19a + 8a = 46a. So it needs 46a (or 550w) on the 12v rail. The other parts don't need 12v power, so you can just add the wattage to keep it simple. mobo (50w) + ram (10w for 2 sticks) + hdd (10w) + dvd (10w) + fans (10w each) means the rest of your parts uses ~100w. Then you add ~100w to account for headroom (so your psu isn't running at max power) and overclocking room. And that accounts for all the parts running at max usage at the same time, which simply won't ever happen. I would be comfortable running a sandy bridge cpu with sli 570s on a decent 750w psu. 850w should be plenty.


+1. The HX 850 will be fine.
November 26, 2011 4:29:01 AM

ahnilated said:
Well if your system starts having problems after say 1 yr of service and degradation you know what you will have to fix. PSU's are the part of a computer I would always spend more money on to make sure it will power everything for 5 yrs.


With ivy bridge and 28nm video cards, power requirements are only going to go DOWN, not up.
November 26, 2011 4:35:03 AM

thebski said:
Well, I don't know much about PC Power and Cooling power supplies, but I do know that you pay for what you get when it comes to power supplies. I would never buy anything but the best when it comes to power supplies because you have $1000's of equpiment behind it.

In my opinion the best is Seasonic when it comes to quality and power output. Others will tell you Corsair, Cooler Master, etc. Just do the research on whichever model you buy and I'm sure you'll be fine. The only reason I made the 5 year warranty remark is because you can run it every hour you want for 5 years like the guy above was saying as long as it has a 5 year (or longer) warranty.


I'm been running a 610 watt PC Power power supply for over 4 years with no problems, runs silently too. Seasonic used to make them, the 950 watt model is not a Seasonic unit.The quality has slid. My next PSU will be a Seasonic.
November 26, 2011 11:13:55 AM

Homeboy2 said:
With ivy bridge and 28nm video cards, power requirements are only going to go DOWN, not up.


Do you understand what happens to power supplies over time?
November 26, 2011 12:41:45 PM

ahnilated said:
Do you understand what happens to power supplies over time?


If he's worried about being close to a power supply's limits he can buy overkill and go 1050 or greater, but to answer his question, YES. YES. YES. You can run 570's in SLI with an 850W power supply. I'm typing on a computer right now that has that setup.
November 26, 2011 5:48:05 PM

ahnilated said:
Do you understand what happens to power supplies over time?


Yep, mines running fine, and as I said power requirements are only going down not up.
November 27, 2011 7:27:37 AM

ahnilated said:
Actually after building PC's for 30 yrs I have a very good idea what it takes to run a PC for 5 yrs at 24/7/365. If you read about power supplies and what they can do at the initial fire up compared to after 5 yrs of use you will see what I am talking about. If you don't plan on using the system for at least 3yrs before buy something new have at it, get whatever power supply works.

I on the other hand like to know that my systems will run 24/7/365 and do without dieing from a weak part. My normal computers crunch Seti during the time when I am not using them and rarely get a break other then a cleaning every 3 months. I also go far beyond what other people do for stability testing when doing overclocking.


and the vast majority of users don't run their comps at load 24/7/365. I quote someone who has forgotten more about power supplies than you'll ever know.
"A quality power supply (like a PC Power) easily lasts 5 to 7 years. The fan is usually the first thing to die."
jonnyGURU
a b ) Power supply
November 28, 2011 6:11:40 PM

GTX 570s are VERY comparable to 480s in power consumption. A solid 850w PSU is more than enough power to run ANY system with 2 of these cards. However, if you OC both the GPUs and the CPU, I'd suggest a bigger unit so that you are not so close to your PSUs max rating. Ideally, I try to never exceed 75% MAX of the PSU rating for long term use. 50% - 65% is much better.

Also, gaming will almost never max both cards to 100%. Benching with something like Furmark will but I can't think of any games that will.

Good threads for questions like this:

http://forum.corsair.com/forums/showthread.php?t=84309

http://forum.corsair.com/forums/showthread.php?t=90125



November 28, 2011 6:26:17 PM

XMSYellowbeard said:
Ideally, I try to never exceed 75% MAX of the PSU rating for long term use. 50% - 65% is much better.


So you suggest to run a power supply in a range it's not very efficient?

i5: 95w
570 sli: 220w x2 = 440w
mobo: 50w
ram: 5w x2 = 10w
hdd + ssd: 10w
fans: 5x x4 = 20w
dvd: 5w

total: 630w

So you'd suggest a PSU that's 970w (65% max )to 1260w (50% max) for this system? BEFORE overclocking? You're effing crazy.
a b ) Power supply
November 28, 2011 6:49:07 PM

hapkido said:
So you suggest to run a power supply in a range it's not very efficient?

i5: 95w
570 sli: 220w x2 = 440w
mobo: 50w
ram: 5w x2 = 10w
hdd + ssd: 10w
fans: 5x x4 = 20w
dvd: 5w

total: 630w

So you'd suggest a PSU that's 970w (65% max )to 1260w (50% max) for this system? BEFORE overclocking? You're effing crazy.


I certainly don't suggest going with more than 65% of the PSUs output rating before OCing. You have to have headroom.

I've never denied being crazy but I if you will do a bit of reading you'll find that the recommendations I made are not outlandish. You can EASILY add 100w of power consumption per device by OCing a CPU or a GPU. So, OC 2 cards and a CPU and you've got 300w of consumption added to your 630w. 930w is 78% of an AX1200.

Of course, actually running a computer at 100% of both CPU and GPU usage continuously is hard to do for the average person under anything resembling normal usage. Which is why a solid 850w PSU is more than enough for this system as I noted above. A good 750w or even 650w unit will do it but I do not recommend stressing PSUs like that for LONG TERM USAGE.

Think of power consumption percentages like a car engine and RPMs. You don't want to run a car around at or close to its redline all the time and expect it to last.
November 28, 2011 7:59:35 PM

1) What does a mechanical engine that wears due to friction have anything to do with computing?

2) Who says overclocking EASILY adds 100w per device? It's probably a lot closer to 25-30w, even figuring it at the wall (wrong for determining PSU power needs).

3) Why would you operate a PSU in a range it's terribly inefficient? Shooting for 80%-90% would be a lot better. And as you alluded to, you'd have to be running multiple benchmarks to get all your components to run at 100% at the same time anyway, so why give yourself two times MORE power than you could ever possibly use?

4) No one that isn't running 3x580s needs 1200w, and even then, that's probably excessive.
November 28, 2011 8:58:55 PM

hapkido said:
1) What does a mechanical engine that wears due to friction have anything to do with computing?

2) Who says overclocking EASILY adds 100w per device? It's probably a lot closer to 25-30w, even figuring it at the wall (wrong for determining PSU power needs).

3) Why would you operate a PSU in a range it's terribly inefficient? Shooting for 80%-90% would be a lot better. And as you alluded to, you'd have to be running multiple benchmarks to get all your components to run at 100% at the same time anyway, so why give yourself two times MORE power than you could ever possibly use?

4) No one that isn't running 3x580s needs 1200w, and even then, that's probably excessive.


I have to call bullshit here on this.

1) Power supplies wear over time like an engine does.
2) Have you ever overclocked a system? Mine with an i7 920 (3.8G) 2X GTX480's can easily hit 975 watts when benching and running some games and ultra settings.
3) Have you read where power supplies are most efficient and do you want any overhead for the system over time?
4) figuring 975 watts for my system with 2 video cards, you then throw in another video card you are going to be damn close to maxing out a 1200 watt.
a c 1098 ) Power supply
November 28, 2011 9:19:36 PM

Quote:
1) What does a mechanical engine that wears due to friction have anything to do with computing?
Do you know what an analogy is?

What happens when you overly stress a mechanical device?

What happens when you overly stress an electrical device?

They will both suffer from premature failure.

Quote:
2) Who says overclocking EASILY adds 100w per device? It's probably a lot closer to 25-30w, even figuring it at the wall (wrong for determining PSU power needs).
That may be what you're experiencing when you overclocked your i5-2500K to 4.4 GHz. Try overclocking your i5-2500K to 4.8 GHz or higher and then come back and talk. I have actually done it with my i5-2500K and I can honestly say it's not anywhere close to the 30 Watts more that you claim, it is at least 60 to 70 Watts more.

Quote:
3) Why would you operate a PSU in a range it's terribly inefficient? Shooting for 80%-90% would be a lot better. And as you alluded to, you'd have to be running multiple benchmarks to get all your components to run at 100% at the same time anyway, so why give yourself two times MORE power than you could ever possibly use?
Have you ever looked at a load vs efficiency graph for any power supply unit certified by the 80 PLUS Program? All of the ones I've looked at, including the one for your Xigmatek NRP-PC602, show that maximum efficiency is reached in the 40% to 50% load range and drops off as the load increases.

Quote:
4) No one that isn't running 3x580s needs 1200w, and even then, that's probably excessive.
Again it comes back to overly stressing an electrical device and causing premature failure. Why would someone spend all that money on three GTX 580's and then buy a power supply that doesn't have enough reserve capacity so that it becomes overly stressed and fails or shuts down while in use?
a b ) Power supply
November 28, 2011 9:38:07 PM

hapkido, I take it that you have never done any advanced OCing with high end components accompanied by load testing??? Try OCing a Bloomfield socket 1366 CPU, (especially the C steppings) or even the new AMD Bulldozers, do some load testing, and then we'll compare notes.

ahnilated and ko888 made some very good points. I'll add some.

1) Electrical components wear just like anything else. No, it's not mechanical wear and adding Castrol won't help but they do wear. Efficiency and overall maximum output reduce over time. Engines don't only wear due to friction. They wear due to heat, same as PSU components.

2) People with specialized equipment for measuring power consumption and people with advanced electrical engineering degrees say that OCing can EASILY add 100w per device.

3) PSUs are NOT their most efficient at 80% - 90%. The same people that mentioned in # 2 above that design our PSUs have tested this. 50% - 65% is the "sweet spot" for efficiency depending upon varying factors and the specific PSU being tested.

Running a PSU at 90% of its rated capacity is neither efficient or smart. The closer to 100% of its max rated load that you run ANY PSU, the higher your chances are of component failure inside the PSU.

4)Yes, there are users that can use and do actually NEED 1200w PSUs that are not running 3 x GTX 580s.
a b ) Power supply
November 28, 2011 9:49:59 PM

XMSYellowbeard said:
hapkido, I take it that you have never done any advanced OCing with high end components accompanied by load testing??? Try OCing a Bloomfield socket 1366 CPU, (especially the C steppings) or even the new AMD Bulldozers, do some load testing, and then we'll compare notes.

ahnilated and ko888 made some very good points. I'll add some.

1) Electrical components wear just like anything else. No, it's not mechanical wear and adding Castrol won't help but they do wear. Efficiency and overall maximum output reduce over time. Engines don't only wear due to friction. They wear due to heat, same as PSU components.

2) People with specialized equipment for measuring power consumption and people with advanced electrical engineering degrees say that OCing can EASILY add 100w per device.

3) PSUs are NOT their most efficient at 80% - 90%. The same people that mentioned in # 2 above that design our PSUs have tested this. 50% - 65% is the "sweet spot" for efficiency depending upon varying factors and the specific PSU being tested.

Running a PSU at 90% of its rated capacity is neither efficient or smart. The closer to 100% of its max rated load that you run ANY PSU, the higher your chances are of component failure inside the PSU.

4)Yes, there are users that can use and do actually NEED 1200w PSUs that are not running 3 x GTX 580s.


So your official opinion as a Corsair employee is that a Corsair PSU rated for CONTINUOUS output of for example 800W does not, actually, last if you pull that out of it? Continously? That's cool, I guess I'm going to stop recommending your products :o 
November 28, 2011 9:57:42 PM

I looked at some charts, and I mis-spoke. It appears many quality PSU are at maximum efficiency near 50% load, being slightly less efficient at 20% and 100%.

As to everything else, humor me and tell me how large of a PSU I should be using? I estimate my system uses about 490w at stock settings. You're saying overclocking adds 100w, so that's 590w. If you're being consistent, you'd tell me I NEED a 787w PSU (75%), just to be safe, but should really have one that's 908w (65%) to 1180w (50%).
a b ) Power supply
November 28, 2011 9:57:52 PM

No FinneousPJ. I did not type an opinon. What you have tried to paraphrase is NOT what I typed and not what I said. Make any recommendation that you like. I am not concerned but, do not misquote me.

ANY product on the planet be it a car, a PSU, an anvil, etc will wear faster at 100% usage than it will at 65% usage. I don't know how to clarify or simplify it any more than that. Let me know if you got my message correct this time.
a b ) Power supply
November 28, 2011 9:58:37 PM

hapkido said:
I looked at some charts, and I mis-spoke. It appears many quality PSU are at maximum efficiency near 50% load, being slightly less efficient at 20% and 100%.

As to everything else, humor me and tell me how large of a PSU I should be using? I estimate my system uses about 490w at stock settings. You're saying overclocking adds 100w, so that's 590w. If you're being consistent, you'd tell me I NEED a 787w PSU (75%), just to be safe, but should really have one that's 908w (65%) to 1180w (50%).

This should help.

http://forum.corsair.com/forums/showthread.php?t=90125
a b ) Power supply
November 28, 2011 10:02:44 PM

XMSYellowbeard said:
No FinneousPJ. I did not type an opinon. What you have tried to paraphrase is NOT what I typed and not what I said. Make any recommendation that you like. I am not concerned but, do not misquote me.

ANY product on the planet be it a car, a PSU, an anvil, etc will wear faster at 100% usage than it will at 65% usage. I don't know how to clarify or simplify it any more than that. Let me know if you got my message correct this time.


But a product that is rated for 800W shouldn't be prone to failure when running at 800W.
a b ) Power supply
November 28, 2011 10:09:50 PM

FinneousPJ said:
But a product that is rated for 800W shouldn't be prone to failure when running at 800W.

I did not say that it was. Please read more carefully before tossing out comments like you have.
!