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Failed Hard Drive and Temps Are Up

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November 26, 2011 7:08:38 PM

I built my computer about 3+ years ago with an Antec 9000 case and a Thermaltake Toughpower W0128RU 650W ATX12V / EPS12V SLI Ready Modular Active PFC Power Supply. I came home last week and found my 2nd hard drive isn't recognized in the bios (unreadable in windows) and my temps are up a little bit. Testing the hd with SeaTools right now, but after some research, I think my hd is fried and needs professional recovery. I can buy a new hd and send it in to have the old data backed up on it. Might cost $500 but it has pictures of my daughter that I really want.

I've noticed one of my front fans spins slowly or seems to slow down and speed up at times (hard to notice). So before I fix my hd I want to be sure I don't need to fix my power supply. Voltage in the bios seems normal I think (at least on the 12V and 3.3V rails that I know should be at those amounts). The failed HD is connected to the power supply on the same cable as the other hard drive and my dvd player. Hope that's not a bad thing..., but my point is that those other two drives work perfectly, so I don't think it's the power cable.

Since the power supply is pretty old anyway, I was thinking about replacing it anyway or building a new computer anyway. If I opt to replace it (maybe while I consider my options and decide what to do), will any new power supply fit in the Antec 9000 case? I would probably want a good one (at least 800W) that i might be able to use on a new computer at some point soon (e.g. Diablo III realease).

Thanks for your help....

-Justin
November 27, 2011 12:37:07 AM

justinj said:
I built my computer about 3+ years ago with an Antec 9000 case and a Thermaltake Toughpower W0128RU 650W ATX12V / EPS12V SLI Ready Modular Active PFC Power Supply. I came home last week and found my 2nd hard drive isn't recognized in the bios (unreadable in windows) and my temps are up a little bit. Testing the hd with SeaTools right now, but after some research, I think my hd is fried and needs professional recovery. I can buy a new hd and send it in to have the old data backed up on it. Might cost $500 but it has pictures of my daughter that I really want.

I've noticed one of my front fans spins slowly or seems to slow down and speed up at times (hard to notice). So before I fix my hd I want to be sure I don't need to fix my power supply. Voltage in the bios seems normal I think (at least on the 12V and 3.3V rails that I know should be at those amounts). The failed HD is connected to the power supply on the same cable as the other hard drive and my dvd player. Hope that's not a bad thing..., but my point is that those other two drives work perfectly, so I don't think it's the power cable.

Since the power supply is pretty old anyway, I was thinking about replacing it anyway or building a new computer anyway. If I opt to replace it (maybe while I consider my options and decide what to do), will any new power supply fit in the Antec 9000 case? I would probably want a good one (at least 800W) that i might be able to use on a new computer at some point soon (e.g. Diablo III realease).

Thanks for your help....

-Justin


Strangely, the hard drive passed all of the SeaTools tests. Why would it be unreadable then? Is there another test I should do?
a b ) Power supply
November 27, 2011 1:48:56 AM

Not making sense here. You say the HDD is not recognized in BIOS, And yet, you were able to run Seatools diagnostics on it? Seatools could not have done anything with that HDD if the BIOS could not find it.

Now, Windows cannot access this HDD. Since you can boot the machine, I assume this HDD is a data storage unit, and not your C: drive. I suggest you use Disk Management to dig up some further info.

Click on Start at lower left, then RIGHT-click on My Computer and choose Manage from the mini-menu. This opens a Computer Management window. On the left expand Storage if necessary and click on Disk Management. The right hand side will split into two panes. BOTH of them SCROLL so you can see all their contents. In the upper right is a list of all the drives, etc. that windows can use now. But concentrate on the LOWER RIGHT pane, where all hardware storage devices are listed, each in its own horizontal box. Some of these Windows can't understand and use sometimes, and your malfunctioning drive is one of those. As long as the BIOS can access it, it will be here even if Windows can't use it.

For each device there is a label at the left end with info like the disk number (e.g., Disk_0), a type, a size, and a status. To the right is a large horizontal box with details of how the HDD is organized. It contains one block for each Partition on the unit (there may be only one Partition taking up all of the space). For each Partition there will be info about the "disk": a Disk Name like "Harry's Disk" you gave it when it was Formatted, a disk letter name like "E:" assigned by Windows, a size, a File System like NTFS, and a status.

There are two common things that can foul up Windows' access to a "drive" (really, a Partition on a HDD unit). If it has no letter name, Windows cannot get to it. If that is the only thing wrong, you can fix easily. RIGHT-click on the block and choose to give it a name - choose any letter not in use. If you do this, back out of Disk Management and reboot so Windows can update the Registry, then look for the drive in My Computer.

The other problem shows up as a File System label of RAW, instead of NTFS or FAT32. If your File System is RAW, it means that a bit of data on the drive's Partition Table has been corrupted and Windows can't figure out how to use it. But your actual data on the drive are VERY likely all there and OK. If this is your situation, back out of Disk Management and search the web (start here on Tom's) for how to recover info from a RAW Format drive. Usually this will involve software tools to find and copy all your data from this drive to a spare other one with space. After that's done you re-Partition and format the drive to restore it to normal use, then restore the copied files back to it.

Post here what you see for this HDD in Disk Management, what you do, and what results you get.
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November 28, 2011 10:50:02 PM

Paperdoc said:
Not making sense here. You say the HDD is not recognized in BIOS, And yet, you were able to run Seatools diagnostics on it? Seatools could not have done anything with that HDD if the BIOS could not find it.

Now, Windows cannot access this HDD. Since you can boot the machine, I assume this HDD is a data storage unit, and not your C: drive. I suggest you use Disk Management to dig up some further info.

Click on Start at lower left, then RIGHT-click on My Computer and choose Manage from the mini-menu. This opens a Computer Management window. On the left expand Storage if necessary and click on Disk Management. The right hand side will split into two panes. BOTH of them SCROLL so you can see all their contents. In the upper right is a list of all the drives, etc. that windows can use now. But concentrate on the LOWER RIGHT pane, where all hardware storage devices are listed, each in its own horizontal box. Some of these Windows can't understand and use sometimes, and your malfunctioning drive is one of those. As long as the BIOS can access it, it will be here even if Windows can't use it.

For each device there is a label at the left end with info like the disk number (e.g., Disk_0), a type, a size, and a status. To the right is a large horizontal box with details of how the HDD is organized. It contains one block for each Partition on the unit (there may be only one Partition taking up all of the space). For each Partition there will be info about the "disk": a Disk Name like "Harry's Disk" you gave it when it was Formatted, a disk letter name like "E:" assigned by Windows, a size, a File System like NTFS, and a status.

There are two common things that can foul up Windows' access to a "drive" (really, a Partition on a HDD unit). If it has no letter name, Windows cannot get to it. If that is the only thing wrong, you can fix easily. RIGHT-click on the block and choose to give it a name - choose any letter not in use. If you do this, back out of Disk Management and reboot so Windows can update the Registry, then look for the drive in My Computer.

The other problem shows up as a File System label of RAW, instead of NTFS or FAT32. If your File System is RAW, it means that a bit of data on the drive's Partition Table has been corrupted and Windows can't figure out how to use it. But your actual data on the drive are VERY likely all there and OK. If this is your situation, back out of Disk Management and search the web (start here on Tom's) for how to recover info from a RAW Format drive. Usually this will involve software tools to find and copy all your data from this drive to a spare other one with space. After that's done you re-Partition and format the drive to restore it to normal use, then restore the copied files back to it.

Post here what you see for this HDD in Disk Management, what you do, and what results you get.


Thank you for your help and sorry for the confusion about the bios. Yes, this is my 2nd drive for more storage. I don't think it's either of those two situations you listed... at least I can't give it a letter (it was letter E: before) and it doesn't show up at the top with a file system label. It is listed at the bottom only as Disk 1 dynamic 'unreadable'. Disk 0 and CD-ROM 0 are both healthy and show up at the top also. Right-clicking on my unreadable drive only brings up options to convert to basic disk, properties, and help. Wish I could insert a screenshot. Any more advice?


a b ) Power supply
November 29, 2011 1:54:45 AM

OK, so it shows up in the bottom right pane of Disk Management. That means the BIOS CAN "see" it, and it is functioning to some extent. Seatools was able to deal with it and found no flaws. And yet, Windows cannot read it at all. This means there are a few data bits corrupted someplace where Windows really needs the data to make sense of the disk organization.

You will need some data recovery process. You certainly can send it off to a professional service and they will likely recover most of your files for a significant fee. However, you could try some yourself for much less money. I'm going to assume it originally was Formatted with the NTFS File System; hence I recommend you try out GetDataBack NTFS here:

http://www.runtime.org/

Note the "How to Guides" list on the right. You can come back to read those. Now click on "GetDataBack" at upper left to read how it works. You will need a spare hard drive big enough to hold ALL the files from your "bad drive" when you copy them over. GetBackData does NOT write to the "bad drive", so it is left in the same state it is in now.

Basically, you download a free trial of the full version of the software, install it NOT on the "bad drive", and run it. For a full large drive it will take a LONG time to analyze and find everything, but ultimately it will show you everything it can get - the entire file structure with folders, etc., and all the files. You can even examine files to verify that they actually do have all their data in them. If you are satisfied that this tools has done what you need, you do NOT shut down the software. Instead you buy the license key from their website, and type it in. The software then will copy all that stuff to the spare drive you specify. You will see that they recommend you disconnect the "bad drive" and store it for at least a month until you are sure you got everything you wanted off it. You now own a copy of GetDataBack.

If you don't think it has recovered enough, you don't pay and just shut down the software. It has not written anything to "bad drive", so it is still untouched and could be processed by some other tools.
November 29, 2011 2:16:18 AM

Thank you so much. Just bought a flash drive to stick my files on... we'll see. Looking forward to not spending $500 on professional services.
!