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Patriot Memory Compatability with sandy bridge

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  • Corsair
  • Sandy Bridge
  • Memory
  • Product
Last response: in Memory
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September 1, 2012 5:35:05 AM

Hi everybody, I've been lurking for a little over a year, but this is my first post.

My question is related to timings and memory controllers on the sandy bridge based processors, specifically, the i7 2600k.

I ordered this memory when it was on sale a few weeks ago on tigerdirect:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

additionally, here is the product page with more information:
http://www.patriotmemory.com/product/specs/PV38G160C9K....


Now my question is how does a SPD of 1600 mhz, which is the case for this memory, work with a memory controller that was designed for memory speed to not exceed 1333mhz? I ask specifically because I do not wish to overclock the memory, due to the fact that it voids my warranty with intel. And as for the fact for I had a motherboard fry that was less than a week old, taking the cpu with it, I am a little caution to be without a desktop for another month and a half.

tl;dr: Would I need to underclock this memory in order to make it work with my sandy bridge build without voiding the warranty? Is this even possible? If I left this memory at it's original timings, would it void the warranty, regardless of it's 1.5v draw, due to the fact that it exceeds the timing designed for the memory controller? Finally, if I left at it's originally timings, would the only issue be possible system instability?


My board is an EVGA sli z68

More about : patriot memory compatability sandy bridge

a b } Memory
September 1, 2012 5:57:33 AM

"Technically", it's overclocking, so "technically", it does void the warranty (for a Sandy Bridge CPU, not Ivy), BUT, if something ever were to happen, and you needed to RMA it, all that would happen is that they would ask you if you had been using faster than 1333 RAM, and obviously, they would just have to believe whatever you say. There's no way for them to know if you have or not, otherwise.

Go right ahead and use it at 1600, like it's intended to be.
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September 1, 2012 6:01:00 AM

How did you find an EVGA Z68 board that only supports up to DDR3-1333?

While it probably would have been less hassle to buy a 1333Mhz kit, your BIOS/CMOS should have an option to change the frequency of the RAM, though I suspect your motherboard will accept DDR3-1600 without much issue.

Please list the full motherboard model number for any more details.
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a b } Memory
September 1, 2012 6:08:00 AM

tivatar said:
How did you find an EVGA Z68 board that only supports up to DDR3-1333?

While it probably would have been less hassle to buy a 1333Mhz kit, your BIOS/CMOS should have an option to change the frequency of the RAM, though I suspect your motherboard will accept DDR3-1600 without much issue.

Please list the full motherboard model number for any more details.


If it's this one http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... and I'm pretty sure it is, it definitely supports faster than 1333 RAM.

He was talking about the CPU (i7 2600K), though, which only "officially" supports up to 1333 RAM (but, of course, it'll run perfectly well on 1600, and even faster, RAM).
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September 1, 2012 6:21:24 AM

DJDeCiBeL said:
If it's this one http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... and I'm pretty sure it is, it definitely supports faster than 1333 RAM.

He was talking about the CPU (i7 2600K), though, which only "officially" supports up to 1333 RAM (but, of course, it'll run perfectly well on 1600, and even faster, RAM).



thanks for the replies, yes, it is the motherboard that you linked DJDeCiBel.

And you are correct, while I am fully aware that my motherboard supports much higher timings than I want to go, I have issue with voiding the warranty of my processor, if I do not have too. I have spent the last month and a half RMA my processor, even without overclocking, and my motherboard, and I would think that intel would get quite curious if I kept sending processors back, regardless if it was my fault or not.

The inherit question was that would I be able to reducing the timing of this memory to the natively supported 1333mhz, even though the SPD of the memory itself is at 1600 mhz.
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September 1, 2012 6:24:57 AM

tivatar said:
How did you find an EVGA Z68 board that only supports up to DDR3-1333?

While it probably would have been less hassle to buy a 1333Mhz kit, your BIOS/CMOS should have an option to change the frequency of the RAM, though I suspect your motherboard will accept DDR3-1600 without much issue.

Please list the full motherboard model number for any more details.




I agree that buying a 1333mhz kit would be easiest, but I got this kit for 20$ on a one day deal, not realizing until recently that the SPD of the memory is set at 1600mhz, rather than 1333mhz. Guess I didn't look close enough
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a b } Memory
September 1, 2012 6:25:29 AM

abraham_mammogram said:
The inherit question was that would I be able to reducing the timing of this memory to the natively supported 1333mhz, even though the SPD of the memory itself is at 1600 mhz.


Yeah, there's no problem with running it at 1333. Slower is a lot easier than faster.

They do have the Performance Tuning Protection Plan , though, for only $25.00 for the 2600K, and it totally covers you for things like that. I have it myself for my own 2500K.
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September 1, 2012 6:35:23 AM

DJDeCiBeL said:
Yeah, there's no problem with running it at 1333. Slower is a lot easier than faster.

They do have the Performance Tuning Protection Plan , though, for only $25.00 for the 2600K, and it totally covers you for things like that. I have it myself for my own 2500K.



interesting, I completely forgot about that insurance plan. The question is, can I purchase the insurance after I purchase the cpu? I already own the cpu.

If that is the case, what is the point of selling the insurance, because if I burn out the processor, couldn't I just essentially buy a new one for 25$ with this insurance plan?
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a b } Memory
September 1, 2012 6:47:28 AM

abraham_mammogram said:
interesting, I completely forgot about that insurance plan. The question is, can I purchase the insurance after I purchase the cpu? I already own the cpu.

If that is the case, what is the point of selling the insurance, because if I burn out the processor, couldn't I just essentially buy a new one for 25$ with this insurance plan?


Yes, and yes.

The insurance basically is like getting a new CPU for $25 (if you fry your current one). The major draw being that there are no questions asked. It doesn't really matter what you do to it, you're covered (well, I suppose hitting it with a hammer isn't covered, LOL).
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September 1, 2012 11:28:03 PM

Best answer selected by abraham_mammogram.
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a c 146 } Memory
September 2, 2012 7:48:29 PM

This topic has been closed by Nikorr
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a c 146 } Memory
September 2, 2012 7:51:57 PM

This topic has been closed by Nikorr
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