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Are those voltages normal?

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September 3, 2012 1:52:58 PM

Hello everyone.
Well , my pc is overheating and i want to know if my voltages are normal.
Thanks.

More about : voltages normal

a b } Memory
September 3, 2012 4:12:58 PM

The computer can reduce the voltages to things if it thinks it is a good idea. Because of that, you can't really look at voltage readings and see whether the PSU is working well or not.

Add to that, programs like HW Monitor just read values from sensors, there is no way to be 100% sure that it is reading the right value from the right sensors. Every motherboard sets up their sensors different and the programs don't always grab the right ones and put them in the right categories.

Even if you had a voltage meter you wouldn't be able to really gain any useful information from it. Due to the way that PSUs are built, the voltage is usually only out of spec for periods mentioned in milliseconds unless there is something seriously wrong with it. Even failing PSUs often pass these basic tests.

That being said, overheating is not usually a voltage problem anyway. The source of overheating problems can usually be traced back to one of two things:
1) Bad case
or
2) Incorrect setup of cooling devices

Given that your processor temps are north of your video card temps, I would guess that these readings were either taken during a processor torture test or your CPU fan isn't correctly pasted/mounted.

I would do the following:
1) Acquire some Arctic Silver 5
2) Take off the Processor Heat Sink
3) Remove all traces of the old paste with a cloth that isn't fluffy like a paper towel and some high purity (isopropyl, for instance) alcohol
4) Let dry for a long time and make sure there isn't any residue from old paste, alcohol, or any fibers from the cloth
5) Put on the new paste by putting a lentil sized drop in the center of the processor
6) Reattach heat sink like it says how to do in the manual, tighten diagonally opposite corners when possible.

- Edit - Typo
September 3, 2012 8:31:02 PM

Raiddinn said:
The computer can reduce the voltages to things if it thinks it is a good idea. Because of that, you can't really look at voltage readings and see whether the PSU is working well or not.

Add to that, programs like HW Monitor just read values from sensors, there is no way to be 100% sure that it is reading the right value from the right sensors. Every motherboard sets up their sensors different and the programs don't always grab the right ones and put them in the right categories.

Even if you had a voltage meter you wouldn't be able to really gain any useful information from it. Due to the way that PSUs are built, the voltage is usually only out of spec for periods mentioned in milliseconds unless there is something seriously wrong with it. Even failing PSUs often pass these basic tests.

That being said, overheating is not usually a voltage problem anyway. The source of overheating problems can usually be traced back to one of two things:
1) Bad case
or
2) Incorrect setup of cooling devices

Given that your processor temps are north of your video card temps, I would guess that these readings were either taken during a processor torture test or your CPU fan isn't correctly pasted/mounted.

I would do the following:
1) Acquire some Arctic Silver 5
2) Take off the Processor Heat Sink
3) Remove all traces of the old paste with a cloth that isn't fluffy like a paper towel and some high purity (isopropyl, for instance) alcohol
4) Let dry for a long time and make sure there isn't any residue from old/new paste or any fibers from the cloth
5) Put on the new paste by putting a lentil sized drop in the center of the processor
6) Reattach heat sink like it says how to do in the manual, tighten diagonally opposite corners when possible.


I tested voltages with more than one programs , also from bios.And my brand of psu is not reliable.
And what you mean by "Bad case"
Thanks.
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a b } Memory
September 3, 2012 8:37:03 PM

If your brand of PSU is not reliable then get a reliable one like XFX or Seasonic.

Bad Case - feel free to read a blog post by me on the subject: http://tinyurl.com/c3h84hs
September 4, 2012 8:31:36 PM

Raiddinn said:
If your brand of PSU is not reliable then get a reliable one like XFX or Seasonic.

Bad Case - feel free to read a blog post by me on the subject: http://tinyurl.com/c3h84hs


I put paste on my cpu and its the same :/ 
Any suggestions ?
a b } Memory
September 4, 2012 8:57:18 PM

I can't imagine it will make a serious difference, but try turning the PC on its side and taking the side off so the part facing up is open and you can look right in.

Once you do that, try to turn it on again and re-record the temperatures after sitting at the desktop like 2 minutes.
September 4, 2012 9:45:04 PM

Raiddinn said:
I can't imagine it will make a serious difference, but try turning the PC on its side and taking the side off so the part facing up is open and you can look right in.

Once you do that, try to turn it on again and re-record the temperatures after sitting at the desktop like 2 minutes.


When im at the desktop the tempratures are like 49C but when i open a heavy game like Dota2 temratures rising to 75C
a b } Memory
September 4, 2012 10:27:25 PM

Are you experiencing stability problems?

The Ivy Bridge chips run hotter than the Sandy Bridge chips and my 3570k with the stock fan doesn't break 36c unless gaming and it very rarely ever breaks 60c.

The temps you are experiencing are entirely too high.

Either you have a really bad case, which is what I wanted to test by telling you to do that stuff
or
Either the processor heat sink/paste is somehow flawed or mounted incorrectly.

If you had the same exact results after you laid the computer on the side and opened up the top, then it sounds more like the second kind of problem.

Are you sure you did everything exactly like I said to? It really matters how much paste is used and how it is applied.
September 5, 2012 3:53:12 PM

Raiddinn said:
Are you experiencing stability problems?

The Ivy Bridge chips run hotter than the Sandy Bridge chips and my 3570k with the stock fan doesn't break 36c unless gaming and it very rarely ever breaks 60c.

The temps you are experiencing are entirely too high.

Either you have a really bad case, which is what I wanted to test by telling you to do that stuff
or
Either the processor heat sink/paste is somehow flawed or mounted incorrectly.

If you had the same exact results after you laid the computer on the side and opened up the top, then it sounds more like the second kind of problem.

Are you sure you did everything exactly like I said to? It really matters how much paste is used and how it is applied.


Okay i open my computer sides i stay in desktop and i had 45C max without running any programs.
Then i run dota2 and i had like 65C max on CPU and 72C max on GPU.
I am quite sure i put the paste correcly.
Is it possible that my power point is broken or something?
a b } Memory
September 5, 2012 8:18:58 PM

The PSU doesn't make you have high temperatures.

The only things that can make you have high temperatures are:
1) Bad Case
2) Incorrectly applied cooler
3) Program isn't reading the data right
4) Poor Cooler

Those things together cover like 98% of temperature issues.

If the processor was bad that would probably account for the other 2%, but there isn't much else short of that that could go wrong.

Are you OCing? Do you have your VCore set to something higher than normal?
September 5, 2012 8:43:52 PM

Raiddinn said:
The PSU doesn't make you have high temperatures.

The only things that can make you have high temperatures are:
1) Bad Case
2) Incorrectly applied cooler
3) Program isn't reading the data right
4) Poor Cooler

Those things together cover like 98% of temperature issues.

If the processor was bad that would probably account for the other 2%, but there isn't much else short of that that could go wrong.

Are you OCing? Do you have your VCore set to something higher than normal?


I have not Overclock and i have not change VCore settings :/ 
It is just overhating. I don't think i over used it because i bought it six months ago.
Anyway thanks for your help man
a b } Memory
September 5, 2012 8:46:16 PM

Technically it isn't even overheating, because 65c is a safe temp for the CPU and 72c is also a safe temp for the video card. However, they are kinda danger zone-ish, at least the CPU anyway.

All the heat problems I have ever seen have been fixable, btw.
a b } Memory
September 5, 2012 8:55:12 PM

Raiddinn said:
The computer can reduce the voltages to things if it thinks it is a good idea. Because of that, you can't really look at voltage readings and see whether the PSU is working well or not.

The ATX PSU voltage are fixed. The 3.3V should always be 3.3V, the 5V rail should always be 5V, the 12V rails should always be always be 12V, etc.

If software reports significantly different voltages, it either means the system monitoring chip is defective, the software is misinterpreting readings or the PSU is defective in which case the computer would most likely not work at all. The best way to know for sure is to measure voltages using a real multimeter.
September 5, 2012 10:27:24 PM

Raiddinn said:
Technically it isn't even overheating, because 65c is a safe temp for the CPU and 72c is also a safe temp for the video card. However, they are kinda danger zone-ish, at least the CPU anyway.

All the heat problems I have ever seen have been fixable, btw.


If my case was closed from both sides the temprature in my cpu is like 79C. My computer has restarted by itself once and i think it was around that temprature.
a b } Memory
September 5, 2012 10:42:55 PM

ReVeStOs said:
If my case was closed from both sides the temprature in my cpu is like 79C. My computer has restarted by itself once and i think it was around that temprature.

Do you have front/bottom intake fans and a rear exhaust one near the CPU? If you don't, I strongly recommend you buy and install at least those 2-3 fans. The closed case temperatures should be close or possibly even better than plain vertical open case without external fan.
September 5, 2012 11:00:53 PM

InvalidError said:
Do you have front/bottom intake fans and a rear exhaust one near the CPU? If you don't, I strongly recommend you buy and install at least those 2-3 fans. The closed case temperatures should be close or possibly even better than plain vertical open case without external fan.


When i open my pc from both sides and turned it on i put a fan ( not computer fan ) near my oppened pc , pointing exactly in my CPU and GPU and the tempratures weren't falling , not even 1C.
Here is my case btw - [ http://i49.tinypic.com/xle0qq.jpg ]
a b } Memory
September 7, 2012 1:03:15 PM

I like how the CD drive is not in the top bay. The hard drive could go a bay lower, though.

However, your CPU temperature is higher than your video card temperature, that tells me its not a problem with the case it is a problem with the processor cooler.

The video card temperatures are going to be hard to affect, because you have one of the types that exhausts out the back, other than piping cold air into the intake for that fan its going to be hard to get external cooling into the card. That is why you can't do anything with the temperatures of it.

I would think that having a huge AC oscillating fan pointed at the CPU would make more than a 1c dent in the temperatures, but its possible there is one or more bubbles trapping air pockets inside the paste, which would make sure that you never got temps down no matter what you do with AC oscillating fans.

Also, what is up with those twisty SATA data cables? I can't imagine a way for a cable to disrupt the airflow more than these kind do. It doesn't really matter for what you are doing now, but its just weird.
September 9, 2012 8:00:23 PM

Raiddinn said:
I like how the CD drive is not in the top bay. The hard drive could go a bay lower, though.

However, your CPU temperature is higher than your video card temperature, that tells me its not a problem with the case it is a problem with the processor cooler.

The video card temperatures are going to be hard to affect, because you have one of the types that exhausts out the back, other than piping cold air into the intake for that fan its going to be hard to get external cooling into the card. That is why you can't do anything with the temperatures of it.

I would think that having a huge AC oscillating fan pointed at the CPU would make more than a 1c dent in the temperatures, but its possible there is one or more bubbles trapping air pockets inside the paste, which would make sure that you never got temps down no matter what you do with AC oscillating fans.

Also, what is up with those twisty SATA data cables? I can't imagine a way for a cable to disrupt the airflow more than these kind do. It doesn't really matter for what you are doing now, but its just weird.


Okay i think my heatsink is not good enough.
Can you suggest me a good heatsink for my cpu?
Thanks.
a b } Memory
September 9, 2012 8:31:11 PM

The Hyper 212 model lineup is a popular one, however, the way it is designed its actually worse in some aspects of cooling than the regular stock fan is.

The Hyper 212 does great for cooling the processor and only that part, but stock fans do double duty cooling chipset components elsewhere on the motherboard and the Hyper 212 won't touch those, instead throwing them to the wolves. They get adequate cooling with the stock fan, but lose all of it with most of the aftermarket fan models.

So it really depends on what you are doing. If you are staying at stock clock rates then the fan that comes with the processor is almost always good enough to cool both the processor and the motherboard.

If you are OCing, then you would rather have the Hyper-212 plus some other kind of solution to make sure motherboard components don't blow up (like a 200mm side fan on the case, or something).

If my gut feeling is right, you can get a whole lot lower temps on the processor without changing out the processor fan (to say nothing of the impact on the motherboard itself) if you just remount the processor a couple more times until it works right.
!