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How do I load BIOS optimized defaults?

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September 3, 2012 2:25:52 PM

Hey, I want to reset my bios to default. I pulled this motherboard out of a friends computer (while he wasn't looking) and it seems that he changed some stuff in the bios or possibly over clocked everything!
When I attempt to update the BIOS via biostar they give a notice "If your motherboard support BIO-UNLOCKING function, please try to load BIOS optimized defaults before update BIOS." I'm not sure how to do this unless it is as simple as going into BIOS and selecting default settings? LOL stupid me!

The problem really is that no game I try and install makes it past the installation of Direct X10/11. Not to mention that installing Win7 was like trying trying to escape from hell. Everything failed that I did, Windows 7 Ultimate and Professional Failed big time because the computer restarted unexpectedly. I went down to XP Pro 32bit and it was smooth/without error. After that I brought it up to Win 7 Home Premium and everything worked up until now.


CPU is AMD Phenom 2 X4 3.4ghz

Motherboard TA790GX A3+ Ver. 5.x


Thanks so much for any help!


a b V Motherboard
September 3, 2012 2:49:04 PM

You could clear the CMOS memory, you should do this anyway when you have updated the BIOS. Alternatively you can enter the BIOS by hitting the DEL or F2 key when the computer first starts up and then selecting Load optimized defaults.
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a b V Motherboard
September 3, 2012 2:52:02 PM

If you want to reset everything to defaults you can just take out the battery for 30 minutes and put it back in. It is a CR 2032 watch battery and is similar looking to a nickel.

However, I am not sure that doing this will fix your problem at all.

Which video card are you using? It may be that your video card is too old to be able to do newer versions of Direct X.
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September 3, 2012 3:12:39 PM

Video card - NVIDIA GeForce GTX 460 768MB

Ram - G SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3

PSU - LOGISYS 600W PS600XBK

I was taking a look at it because it would not complete installation of any OS, and I was told by a friend to pull the mobo battery. I say "yea" and he walks over and yanks the battery while the mobo was connect to power (but not on). Afterwards the mobo and everything else seem dead (would not power up at all). I left the battery out for about two hours and it booted back up fine.


Do the cpu clock settings stick to a cpu after it is transfered?

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a b V Motherboard
September 3, 2012 3:31:39 PM

Tell the guy who pulled out the battery while the power cord was still inserted that he is an idiot first of all.

Doing such things with a battery is unlikely to cause any long term damage, however, its just an industry worst practice and it can get him in a lot of trouble with a lot of other kinds of parts.

If he wants to do it, he can do it with his own PC, not with yours.

As far as your other questions, the battery powers the BIOS chip when the power cord is not inserted such as when you take the motherboard out of one computer and put it in another. It would keep powering that chip even if you took the CPU out and put it back in later. It would keep powering the chip even if you took the CPU out and replaced it with another different one instead.

That is part of why I suggested taking the battery out, to make sure none of the old configuration remains behind whatever that configuration was. After 30 min with the battery out it won't matter whatever settings were saved for use with prior hardware. The BIOS will have to re-configure itself on the next boot with whatever hardware is connected afterwards.

The card should work with Direct X 11. The CPU, Motherboard, and RAM shouldn't really care about what Direct X you have.

The PSU looks a bit aggressive, though. Both the Phenom 2 x4 and the GTX 460 suck down quite a bit of juice and that brand isn't a great one.

- Edit 2 - This is more general than anything, its a remote possibility that it would actually affect an OS install, but it most certainly would affect regular operations.

Is that Windows 7 Home Premium version you have currently working a 32 bit install or a 64 bit install?

You can't install a 64 over the top of a 32 bit OS or vice versa. To get a 64 bit OS to install in place of a 32 bit install you would have to blow away everything that is already there. You wouldn't be able to do that by popping the CD in when the OS was already booted and hitting upgrade. You would have to start with the CD inserted and choose to delete the prior partitions in one of the first screens you come to and then install from there.

- Edit - Clarity
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September 3, 2012 10:24:02 PM

Raiddinn said:
The PSU looks a bit aggressive, though. Both the Phenom 2 x4 and the GTX 460 suck down quite a bit of juice and that brand isn't a great one.

- Edit 2 - This is more general than anything, its a remote possibility that it would actually affect an OS install, but it most certainly would affect regular operations.




When you say aggressive, what do you mean? Too Much Wattage! Too Low, Cheap Brand?

And also "that brand isn't a great one" is in referance to the PSU or the Graphics Card? Because I have been thinking that I would go with a AMD model Radeon something, but if thats not the problem, I would rather stay put for a year (mabey).
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a b V Motherboard
September 3, 2012 10:38:00 PM

By aggressive I mean that I wouldn't use it in my computer regardless of which parts I had. It has more to do with the brand than the wattage, IE I would rather have a better brand than more wattage from the same brand.

The GTX 460 is two generations old now which means it is definitely showing its age, but you can probably pretty safely wait until the 3rd newer generation comes out unless you just have so much money you don't know what to do with it all.

ATI vs Nvidia has hardcore fans on either side. For the most part, you can just pick the best one in your budget range and be done with it regardless which maker it happens to be from. Different games optimize for different makers, but they usually balance out. AMDs are usually the more value oriented buys, tending to be cheaper for equivalent performance. Nvidia is the more respected brand and that's usually reflected in the price.
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September 24, 2012 4:46:06 PM

Best answer selected by JerryMcFail.
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