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How is this setup for gaming?

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August 30, 2011 2:32:53 PM

Intel core i3 2100 [3.1 GHz]
8gb DDR3 Ram
AMD Radeon HD 6570 1gb DDR3
450 Watts
500gb SATA-III 6.0gb/s 16mb cache 7200 rpm
Asetek 510 LC Liquid Cooling

Comes out to about $530 :D 

*Im hoping to be able to run GTA IV and BFBC2 on max and be able to play BF3 on high.

More about : setup gaming

August 30, 2011 3:14:56 PM

Hi there, welcome to the forums.

First things first, I always advice people to not go with Cyberpower, and to build themselves. Why? You save around ~$200 if you build yourself. With that extra $200, you could build a MUCH better system than this one!

But, I'll stick to cyberpower.

Honestly, that build sucks. You'll be lucky to run BC2 @1080p on medium, let alone max.

Here's what you need to do.

-drop to 4GB ram
-upgrade GPU to at least 6870 (if you are playing @1080p)
-drop the water cooling

Or, just build a PC yourself! You can get much more for $500 if you build yourself.
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August 30, 2011 3:57:41 PM

What exactly is CyberPower?
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August 30, 2011 4:00:27 PM

i agree with striker410 leave every thing if u want to maxed out gta iv and other heavy games.1st upgrade ur gpu to higher level like hd 6950 in this card u are able to unclock to hd 6970 and it let u play games on max.2nd downgrade ram to 4gb its enough for games but gta iv is cpu intensive the recommend requirement of this game is quad core cpu.your cpu is too good for games but not exactly for gta iv

core i5 2500k can maxed every game.
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August 30, 2011 4:01:07 PM

i agree with striker410 leave every thing if u want to maxed out gta iv and other heavy games.1st upgrade ur gpu to higher level like hd 6950 in this card u are able to unclock to hd 6970 and it let u play games on max.2nd downgrade ram to 4gb its enough for games but gta iv is cpu intensive the recommend requirement of this game is quad core cpu.your cpu is too good for games but not exactly for gta iv

core i5 2500k can maxed every game.
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August 30, 2011 4:28:54 PM

since you are trying to keep it cheap try 6850/460 GTX at the very least for enjoyable gaming
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August 30, 2011 4:42:31 PM

If that was a Cyberpower build (008Rohit: they're a boutique system builder), you can be sure they cut a lot of corners; the PSU in particular is probably junk and couldn't handled a better video card anyway.
I also agree with striker410. If you have reasonable manual dexterity and visual acuity, you can build a decent system for less than any boutique vendor, and/or get much better parts for the same money. Youtube is full of video examples, and there are a lot of other online references to the actual building. There's a sticky in the New Builds forum here on asking for new build advice. If you fill that in, I'm sure you'll get a lot of useful build suggestions.
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August 30, 2011 9:44:33 PM

always build your own system this will be better than ready made.
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August 31, 2011 7:16:18 AM

To build or not to build, that is the question.

The advantages of building

1. Lower initial cost on most systems, although might be minimal on basic systems costing less than about $450
2. Personal satisfaction
3. Better quality components
4. Acquisition of knowledge about computers and skills
5. Confidence in working on computer - and in doing upgrades
6. The big cost savings really comes after several years when you can upgrade instead of buying a new one. You can generally continue using the case, power supply, optical drive and operating system (depending on obsolesce on the latter) and maybe the graphics card (which you might already have updated anyway), and get just a new motherboard, CPU and memory at about half the cost of a new machine.
7. No vendor installed bloatware slowing down your system and taking up hard drive space for the life of the computer.
8. Having a complete BIOS that allows making changes and supports overclocking rather than one limited by manufacturer.
9. The ability to size components correctly so you don’t later find out that when you want to upgrade a graphics card that you also have to upgrade and replace a power supply.
10. Membership in the eclectic group of BYOers - a very intelligent, affable, handsome, honest, trustworthy, loyal, kind, and modest group.
11.Bragging rights - be they as they may - of BYO - and all the chicks it brings - or vice versa if you are vice versa - or even just vice.

Of course there are disadvantages:

1. Time is the big one - you have to invest some time in configuration, purchasing components, assembling the PC, loading the operating system, testing it, and sometime trouble shooting problems. The actual assembly only takes about 1-2 hours for an experienced hand, for a newbie taking their time approximately 4-6 hours, assuming no problems, which do occasionally occur. But if you consider it a hobby and learning experience then this should not be a big issue.
2. Support and - if something goes wrong with the PC you don't have a convenient number to call, you have to fix it yourself, with help from forums like this.
3. Warranty - you have the individual component vendor warranties which are sometimes shorter than what is provided by a vendor selling complete systems.
4. No vendor to cuss at when things go wrong. If you enjoy being able to rage at someone for months the BYO is not for you – it is no fun raging at yourself.

Here’s how simple it really is:

Youtube video showing how easy it is – with good general instructions
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D_E3ULURHkE&feature=rela...


Step by Step Instructions with Pictures
http://www.computerforum.com/104641-how-build-computer-...
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/274745-31-step-step-g...

And two more options with detailed instructions:

http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/How_To_Assemble_A_Desktop_...
http://www.kitchentablecomputers.com/index.php

For more detailed instructions on installing a video card:

http://www.upgradevideocards.com/install.html

Off course, most computer components also come with instructions for their installation, and the motherboard usually has a guide for plugging everything into it.

Now go back and re-read the advantages and build that thing. Or not.

By the way - I just priced out a system on CyberPower and newegg - basic components were:

i5-2500K CPU
Gigabate Z68 mobo
EVGA GTX mobo
NZXT case
8 GB Crucial memory
Corsair 750TX PSU
Windows 7
1 TB HD
ASUS Blu-Ray reader - DVD writer comb


Also included a card reader, heatsink/fan, Logiteck keyboard and mouse

The Cyberpower price was $1360 and newegg was $130 less - not as large a difference as I expected. And of course with CyberPower you get some support.
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