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Is FM1 right for my first build?

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  • Homebuilt
  • Systems
Last response: in Systems
September 5, 2011 3:34:48 AM

Hello,

I'm new to building my own PC, and new to PC's in general. I'm an Apple guy, but frankly I've become a bit disappointed with their desktop offerings lately, so I've decided to try my luck with building my own system.

The chart here for the AMD office recommends going for the AMD A8-3850. From what I understand, this is a few socket type for AMD. My fear is that for my first build I'm going to be pigeon holing myself into something new, and won't have the room to grow or expand later down the line. Would I be better off sticking with something like the Athlon II X4 640, and perhaps an AM3+ MOBO so that I can be ready in a year or two for a newer CPU?

Also, I'm wanting to get into a decent MOBO for under $120 that will support anywhere between 16-32GB of RAM, plenty of SATA connections, and enough USB 2.0's. The Biostar A880G+ looks good for real cheap, but I get the feeling this isn't going to give me the room to grow that I want, not even taking the whole AM3+ thing into account...

I need some help here. Please. Be gentle.

More about : fm1 build

September 5, 2011 3:44:38 AM

Yeah FM1 is for AMD LLano which in your case is the a8-3850. Actually it depends, AM3+ sockets could be better since their new line of processors are coming out this year which are rumoured to be a powerhouse.

FM1 mobos could also be used for newer Llano cpus but if we're talking about hardcore gaming, I'd stick with the AM3+ sockets.

Anyway, both have upgrade paths but it really depends on your intended use for the computer you're going to buy. If you plan on gaming, then the AM3+ sockets would be better since the Llanos are only bought for their built in GPUS which isn't really that strong in comparison to a mid- high end graphics card.
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September 5, 2011 3:46:23 AM

What are you going to be doing with your system? If you are going to be doing heavy graphics work you may be better off sticking with an i5 2500 or i7 2600, they are quite a bit quicker than the A8-3850 in many applications.

If you are just going to be doing general web browsing and some office stuff then i would price out one of the lower end APUs, the A6 series, and the Athlon II X4 and find out what a full build would end up costing you.

Also, 16GB of memory is pretty much useless, 32GB is totally useless on a processor of that level, if you were running a dual processor work station then maybe, but on a single quad core AMD CPU 16GB would be more than you will ever need, for 99% of applications 8GB is more than enough, only if you were to be running multiple applications from CS5 could you possibly use more than that.
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September 5, 2011 3:52:17 AM

This machine is mainly going to be used for Office multi tasking, web browsing with dozens of tabs open at once, as I'm a librarian who does tons of research, database building, and GIS library creation and some light Adobe work for cartography and map making. No real gaming, but the WoW bug might get me again.

I know for my stated needs that I could likely get away with something pretty cheap, but I've been an Apple guy for so long, and have been bruned so much by getting into systems that I can't really upgrade, I want to be sure whatever I build will have room to grow.

My priorities are:
-Stability
-Expandability
-Cost

Performance on the gaming or video front is actually fairly low on the list.
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September 5, 2011 3:55:17 AM

If it's cost then the A6 or A8 AMD Llanos would be better for you since their built in video card would save you a lot of dough and would be better for casual gaming. It's cheaper because you won't need to buy a graphics card. Also, it's good for multi tasking since it has 4 cores.

Go for it, there would be no reason for you to get other than the a6 or a8
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September 5, 2011 3:57:50 AM

ervinelim said:
If it's cost then the A6 or A8 AMD Llano's would be better for you since their built in video card would save you a lot of dough and would be better for casual gaming. It's cheaper because you won't need to buy a graphics card. Also, it's good for multi tasking since it has 4 cores.


That's what I have come to understand, but my concern is that it will suit my present needs just fine, but in two years I fear I won't have any options. Do you think this is unfounded?
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September 5, 2011 4:06:58 AM

You will still have options but if you're just going for multi tasking and office stuff then it will suit your needs in the long run. Don't worry, in two years or more you can always add a video card or upgrade your processor since FM1 is still new and will be used for future APUs.
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a c 143 B Homebuilt system
September 5, 2011 4:07:18 AM

sqoon said:
That's what I have come to understand, but my concern is that it will suit my present needs just fine, but in two years I fear I won't have any options. Do you think this is unfounded?


AMD has a road map already that includes future versions of the Fusion APU's with significantly upgraded cores . I dont know if a board you buy today would support those processors , but AMD have a long history of not making unnecessary changes so builders can reuse and update hardware

I also doubt if your applications will become significantly more demanding on a cpu even in wo years time . Just install 2 x4 gig of RAM and I think you are covered for the reasonable life of your computer
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September 5, 2011 4:12:03 AM

ervinelim said:
You will still have options but if you're just going for multi tasking and office stuff then it will suit your needs in the long run. Don't worry, in two years or more you can always add a video card or upgrade your processor since FM1 is still new and will be used for future APUs.


Thank you, sir! I think the A6 will suit my needs just fine and I think you have helped quench my hesitation about getting into something new like the FM1. Any advice on a good MOBO? I think I was looking at the ASUS F1A75-V Pro - F1. Again, this seemed to have a lot of expandability options, but I'm dumb, new and dumb. I could use any advice.
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September 5, 2011 4:12:16 AM

Outlander_04 said:
AMD has a road map already that includes future versions of the Fusion APU's with significantly upgraded cores . I dont know if a board you buy today would support those processors , but AMD have a long history of not making unnecessary changes so builders can reuse and update hardware

I also doubt if your applications will become significantly more demanding on a cpu even in wo years time . Just install 2 x4 gig of RAM and I think you are covered for the reasonable life of your computer


I couldn't have said it better myself. =(
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September 5, 2011 4:14:47 AM

sqoon said:
Thank you, sir! I think the A6 will suit my needs just fine and I think you have helped quench my hesitation about getting into something new like the FM1. Any advice on a good MOBO? I think I was looking at the ASUS F1A75-V Pro - F1. Again, this seemed to have a lot of expandability options, but I'm dumb, new and dumb. I could use any advice.


Any cheap, inexpensive mobo would suit your needs. Asrock and Asus is always a reliable brand. Just make sure it's FM1. Anyway, you can make a new thread on making your own budget build and the forum would gladly help you out.

Just follow the format

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261222-31-build-advic...
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