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RAM not "officially supported"

Last response: in Memory
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September 14, 2012 4:40:14 AM

On the intel website it says the 2500k only supports up to 1333mhz of RAM, but I know for a fact that the 2500k can go higher. I read that this is because it is not "officially supported" by intel. What does this mean exactly?
a b } Memory
September 14, 2012 7:33:13 AM

I believe it means they didn't test it with whatever RAM speed you are thinking so they cannot guarantee that it will work
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a c 347 } Memory
a b å Intel
September 14, 2012 2:57:51 PM

Example
Intel i5-2500K - http://ark.intel.com/products/52210/Intel-Core-i5-2500K...(6M-Cache-up-to-3_70-GHz)
Memory Types DDR3-1066/1333
Max Memory Bandwidth 21 GB/s
21GB/s = 21504MB/s = XMHz * 2 * 64-bit * 1/8
X = 1344MHz = DDR3-2688 and there are DDR3-2600 Kits
Intel i5-3570K - http://ark.intel.com/products/65520/Intel-Core-i5-3570K...
Memory Types DDR3-1333/1600
Max Memory Bandwidth 25.6 GB/s
25.6GB/s = 26214.4MB/s = XMHz * 2 * 64-bit * 1/8
X = 1638.4MHz = DDR3-3276.8 and there are DDR3-2800 Kits and folks have OC the RAM >DDR3-3000

The 'Memory Types' are the Intel spec Rated & Default DDR3 Frequencies; that's all it means. On either platform RAM >DDR3-1600 CAS 8 or 9 yields minimal if any 'real world' differences, and Frequencies much higher adds unnecessary instability. So for the best experience I recommend XMP Profile DDR3-1600 CAS 8 or 9 memory and in 2x4GB density kits.
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September 28, 2012 3:17:54 AM

Best answer selected by rewben2.
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