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[Motherboards] New Gigabyte motherboard and too many case standoffs

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September 14, 2012 1:09:48 PM

Hi Everyone,

I'm currently trying to upgrade a Dell 630i case to be a bit more modern. I researched the new motherboard and found that the Gigabyte GA-Z68XP-UD3 board should fit into the case just fine. Upon installing the board, I found that it did fit just fine except for one problem: the case itself has 10 standoffs, but the board only has screw points for 9 of them. I didn't find this out until after screwing in the board and finding I had one screw remaining.

So, obvious question: what do I do about this 10th standoff that I have no screw point for? Can I just ignore it? It will likely be touching the motherboard, so that seems like it would cause a short when I power up the system. I don't see a way to remove the standoff as it appears to be soldered directly onto the case. Can I put electrical tape over the standoff and have the motherboard rest on that?

I'm a bit green to building, so I welcome any and all responses. Looking for any and all help as I don't want to give up on these parts and eat the money on them.

Thanks in advance!
a b V Motherboard
September 14, 2012 1:26:57 PM

Look at the manual for your motherboard. It should display how many standoffs are needed and where they should be located. Most ATX motherboards only use 9 standoffs, so removing the 10th should be no issue.





Edited to correct typo
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September 14, 2012 1:34:54 PM

Maybe I'm confused on what "standoff" means then. The case I have, the Dell 630i case, has 10 thin screw bars that stick up from the case. These "bars" are soldered into the case and don't appear to be removable.

The motherboard has nothing on it but the 9 screw holes. Looking at the stock motherboard I took out of the case, it appears I just need to screw the motherboard to these "bars" that stick up from the case. When I do that, there is one more bar than screw holes.

Do I have this right?
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a b V Motherboard
September 14, 2012 1:52:40 PM

This is the problem when you try to use a proprietary case with a non-proprietary motherboard. There are going to be inconsistencies. If the new motherboard doesn't have matching holes for the screws, then obviously, you can't attach to the 10th mounting bar. I would put a piece of electrical tape over the bar to prevent any shorting problem.
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September 14, 2012 1:57:59 PM

Thank you! I will give that a try.

Just to be sure I understand as well, these mounting bars that are in the 630i case, are these the standoffs for the case? Am I using that term correctly? I'm concerned that there should be something else connecting the motherboard to the case, but all I have are these metal mounting bars, 10 screws, and the 9 holes in the new motherboard. There is nothing else supplied, so I assumed that's all I had to do is screw the board to these bars?
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a b V Motherboard
September 14, 2012 3:37:34 PM

I STRONGLY suggest against using electrical tape over the standoff. It probably will work for a while but may rub through over time. If I were you I would saw the offending standoff off using a hack saw. Saw it off as close to the metal pan as possible. FWI, the standoffs are likely spot welded to the metal pan, not soldered.
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a c 222 V Motherboard
September 14, 2012 3:41:09 PM

The extra standoff post can be unscrewed from the motherboard tray using the appropriate sized hex nut driver or equivalent tool.

Do not leave any unused standoff posts, that don't directly correspond to a mounting hole for the motherboard, on the motherboard tray.
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a b V Motherboard
September 14, 2012 3:50:15 PM

I would take their recommendations on either covering or removing the "standoff", but make sure they are indeed standoffs by making sure that the MOBO lines up correctly with the I/O cutout from the rear of the case. Usually if the standoffs are not placed correctly the I/O ports are not going to matchup.
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September 14, 2012 3:59:13 PM

ram1009 said:
I STRONGLY suggest against using electrical tape over the standoff. It probably will work for a while but may rub through over time. If I were you I would saw the offending standoff off using a hack saw. Saw it off as close to the metal pan as possible. FWI, the standoffs are likely spot welded to the metal pan, not soldered.



I'm interested. What action will cause this "rubbing" of which you speak?
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September 14, 2012 3:59:32 PM

Thanks everyone!

Everything lines up perfectly except for this one standoff, including the I/O cutout. I did take the advice and placed some electrical tape over the top of the standoff and have seated the motherboard now. Unfortunately, it appears my problems continue. After connecting everything else, I tried to boot the system but to no avail. I'm going to do some searching on the symptoms and see what the causes might be, but if you can help here, that would be great.

After getting the motherboard seated, I connected all the cables to the board, installed an old video card just in case something went wrong, and I did not install any RAM. All RAM slots are empty. I boot the machine, which turns on, firing all fans and case lights, etc. However, I don't get any video out and don't make it to any BIOS screen, etc. Instead, the machine stays on for about 5 seconds and then turns off. After about 5 more seconds, it turns itself back on again; I don't have to press the power button, it just turns itself back on. It repeats this cycle until I unplug it from the power cord.
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a b V Motherboard
September 14, 2012 4:36:23 PM

So are the "standoffs" in the case made of metal? I thought standoffs were supposed to be plastic so that it did not make an electrical connection with the case? But again if the I/O shield lines up I feel like it has to be correct. And I think you have to have the RAM installed to boot but I am not 100%... You are sure your PSU is good?
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a c 222 V Motherboard
September 14, 2012 4:43:37 PM

missingsc said:
Thanks everyone!

Everything lines up perfectly except for this one standoff, including the I/O cutout. I did take the advice and placed some electrical tape over the top of the standoff and have seated the motherboard now. Unfortunately, it appears my problems continue. After connecting everything else, I tried to boot the system but to no avail. I'm going to do some searching on the symptoms and see what the causes might be, but if you can help here, that would be great.

After getting the motherboard seated, I connected all the cables to the board, installed an old video card just in case something went wrong, and I did not install any RAM. All RAM slots are empty. I boot the machine, which turns on, firing all fans and case lights, etc. However, I don't get any video out and don't make it to any BIOS screen, etc. Instead, the machine stays on for about 5 seconds and then turns off. After about 5 more seconds, it turns itself back on again; I don't have to press the power button, it just turns itself back on. It repeats this cycle until I unplug it from the power cord.

Constant reboot cycle may be caused by incorrect wiring of the front panel connector from the computer case.

Try leaving the from panel connector disconnected and just momentarily shorting the two pins, that correspond to the power switch, on the motherboard's front panel header. If it works properly then the connector from the case will need to be correctly rewired to match what the motherboard expects.
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September 14, 2012 9:46:35 PM

Thanks for the help everyone! It turns out there two things wrong: first was that I had a badly seated 24 pin connector into the board. It wasn't making a constant connection; second was the RAM. Without the RAM in, the board won't POST. I thought I had read somewhere (and of course I can't find it now) that you could boot without the RAM in for a test, but that wasn't the case. As soon as I stuck a RAM module in, it POSTed just fine and started loading Windows.

Thanks again!
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September 24, 2012 6:05:11 PM

Best answer selected by missingsc.
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