[Graphic Cards For Under 250$] Help

Hey

I am thinking of replacing my 8800GT graphics card and I was wondering if there were any good graphic cards for under 250$. I have been searching and so many results come up Im unsure which ones are good and which cards are bad. I have been considering ATI since they are cheap but is ATI compatible with an Intel processor? Probably a noob question but Im going to ask anyway. Thanks

Dkt
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  1. http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/best-graphics-card,2964-4.html

    According to that, Radeon HD 6950 1 GB

    Oh and it does not matter what CPU you have, you can use the AMD (no longer ATI) card
  2. While it doesn't matter what brand CPU he has, I wouldn't blindly recommend an HD6950 without knowing what CPU it would be paired with, or what resolution monitor he's using. The goal should be creating a balanced, well-matched system. As such, those two factors of the equation need to be known before you can properly match a GPU to them.
  3. RazberyBandit said:
    While it doesn't matter what brand CPU he has, I wouldn't blindly recommend an HD6950 without knowing what CPU it would be paired with, or what resolution monitor he's using. The goal should be creating a balanced, well-matched system. As such, those two factors of the equation need to be known before you can properly match a GPU to them.


    True, I just went ahead and looked on the Best Graphics card for july and looked at the one that was right under $250 lol
    But technically he did ask for the "best" under $250. You get what you ask for.
  4. Hehe. Technically, there are a LOT of good graphics cards under that $250 mark. Solid improvements over his current 8800GT start at about $120 (5770 or GTX460-768mb) and go up from there.
  5. I recommend the 560 ti Nvidia card i got it and its all i need and more.
  6. Quote:
    While it doesn't matter what brand CPU he has, I wouldn't blindly recommend an HD6950 without knowing what CPU it would be paired with, or what resolution monitor he's using. The goal should be creating a balanced, well-matched system. As such, those two factors of the equation need to be known before you can properly match a GPU to them.


    Heres Some more information:

    Resoulotion: 1680x 1050

    Occupations: Gaming, with some 3D and movie editing

    CPU: LGA755 E56850 Dual core 3.00 GHZ

    Motherboard: nVidia nForce 680i SLI SPP
  7. With a socket-775 Core2-Duo, I recommend going with either a GTX460-1GB or GTX560, or their comparable AMD counterparts, the 6850 and 6870. All those cards run somewhere between $150 and $190 and should perform quite well.

    There's not a whole lot of difference between the 460-1GB and 560. The 560 is basically a streamlined 460 that runs at higher default clock speeds. The 6850 and 6870 are quite simply AMD's rival cards in both performance and price comparisons to the 460 and 560.
  8. RazberyBandit said:
    With a socket-775 Core2-Duo, I recommend going with either a GTX460-1GB or GTX560, or their comparable AMD counterparts, the 6850 and 6870. All those cards run somewhere between $150 and $190 and should perform quite well.

    There's not a whole lot of difference between the 460-1GB and 560. The 560 is basically a streamlined 460 that runs at higher default clock speeds. The 6850 and 6870 are quite simply AMD's rival cards in both performance and price comparisons to the 460 and 560.


    RazberyBandit What would you recommend the most AMD or Nvidia, Im thinking more about the 6870 since its cheaper however would you recommend buying from a manufacturer like XFX? And Im reading in many forums saying that Nvdia cards use more higher quality parts, thats why they are more expensive, so i guess im tied between two companies.
  9. The 900 MHz 560 Ti runs as low as $210. The test results speak for themselves. At 2560 x 1600, I'd get the 69xx 2GB

    Guru3D uses the following games in their test suite, COD-MW, Bad Company 2, Dirt 2, Far Cry 2, Metro 2033, Dawn of Discovery, Crysis Warhead. Total fps (summing fps in each game @ 1920 x 1200) for the various options in parenthesis (single card / SL or CF) are tabulated below along with their cost in dollars per frame single card - CF or SLI:

    $155.00 460-768 MB (314/592) $0.49 - $0.52
    $155.00 6850 (371/634) $0.42 - $0.49
    $170.00 6870 (434/701) $0.39 - $0.49
    $250.00 6950 (479/751) $0.52 - $0.67
    $290.00 6950 Frozr OC (484/759) $0.60 - $0.76
    $210.00 560 Ti (455/792) $0.46 - $0.53
    $355.00 6970 (526/825) $0.67 - $0.86
    $220.00 560 Ti - 900 Mhz (495/862) $0.44 - $0.51
    $335.00 570 (524/873) $0.64 - $0.77

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=ENE&IsNodeId=1&Description=900mHz%20560&bop=And&Order=PRICE&PageSize=20
  10. JackNaylorPE said:
    The 900 MHz 560 Ti runs as low as $210. The test results speak for themselves. At 2560 x 1600, I'd get the 69xx 2GB

    Guru3D uses the following games in their test suite, COD-MW, Bad Company 2, Dirt 2, Far Cry 2, Metro 2033, Dawn of Discovery, Crysis Warhead. Total fps (summing fps in each game @ 1920 x 1200) for the various options in parenthesis (single card / SL or CF) are tabulated below along with their cost in dollars per frame single card - CF or SLI:

    $155.00 460-768 MB (314/592) $0.49 - $0.52
    $155.00 6850 (371/634) $0.42 - $0.49
    $170.00 6870 (434/701) $0.39 - $0.49
    $250.00 6950 (479/751) $0.52 - $0.67
    $290.00 6950 Frozr OC (484/759) $0.60 - $0.76
    $210.00 560 Ti (455/792) $0.46 - $0.53
    $355.00 6970 (526/825) $0.67 - $0.86
    $220.00 560 Ti - 900 Mhz (495/862) $0.44 - $0.51
    $335.00 570 (524/873) $0.64 - $0.77

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=ENE&IsNodeId=1&Description=900mHz%20560&bop=And&Order=PRICE&PageSize=20


    Hm I guess its the Nvdia 560 TI, Now I just need to debate on which Card manufacturer i should choose...

    Oh yeah can somone tell me why this model http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814130651&cm_re=900mHz_560-_-14-130-651-_-Product

    Is cheaper than this one: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814130657&cm_re=900mHz_560-_-14-130-657-_-Product


    There exactly the same specs yet ones cheaper hmmm.
  11. Jack, the only problem with that link is the top 2 cards aren't 560Ti's, they're regular 560's that have been factory OC'd. Look at the processor core counts... 334 on the 560 vs. 384 on the 560Ti. You can't get a 560Ti for $210, but they do start at $220 with Palit and Zotac's cheapest models. $240 gets you into quality models from eVGA, MSI, and ASUS.

    dkt3. nVIDIA uses higher quality parts? Hogwash! nVIDIA doesn't even manufacture cards -- they manufacture chips that other companies use to manufacture actual cards.

    The GTX460-1GB is a great buy at $160. The 560 is a decent buy at $190. Again, the only real difference between them is the 560's streamlining of the GF104 GPU, which allows it to run at higher speeds by default. (With the same or even lowered power requirements.) Sure, it may be possible to OC a 460 to the 560's stock speeds, but it would use more power doing so than an actual 560 running at those speeds.

    As for my personal views on nVIDIA and AMD, I'm a little more hesitant to recommend AMD's 6000-series cards lately due to a few driver issues. And nVIDIA does tend to have more reliable (and often quicker) driver releases. All-around, both make great GPUs that represent real value for the money to consumers today. The only real problem I see is how closely priced different GPUs within each brand's lineup can be. The entire $100 to $200 market is essentially flooded with step-up GPUs that are only $20 or so more than the previous GPU in the lineup, which makes it hard to pass up spending that $20 for that extra performance.

    If it's a toss-up between the 6870 and the 560 at $190 to $200, the 560 would get my vote. Just keep in mind that you can get almost as much performance from the GTX460-1GB for only $160.
  12. RazberyBandit said:
    Jack, the only problem with that link is the top 2 cards aren't 560Ti's, they're regular 560's that have been factory OC'd. Look at the processor core counts... 334 on the 560 vs. 384 on the 560Ti. You can't get a 560Ti for $210, but they do start at $220 with Palit and Zotac's cheapest models. $240 gets you into quality models from eVGA, MSI, and ASUS.

    dkt3. nVIDIA uses higher quality parts? Hogwash! nVIDIA doesn't even manufacture cards -- they manufacture chips that other companies use to manufacture actual cards.

    The GTX460-1GB is a great buy at $160. The 560 is a decent buy at $190. Again, the only real difference between them is the 560's streamlining of the GF104 GPU, which allows it to run at higher speeds by default. (With the same or even lowered power requirements.) Sure, it may be possible to OC a 460 to the 560's stock speeds, but it would use more power doing so than an actual 560 running at those speeds.

    As for my personal views on nVIDIA and AMD, I'm a little more hesitant to recommend AMD's 6000-series cards lately due to a few driver issues. And nVIDIA does tend to have more reliable (and often quicker) driver releases. All-around, both make great GPUs that represent real value for the money to consumers today. The only real problem I see is how closely priced different GPUs within each brand's lineup can be. The entire $100 to $200 market is essentially flooded with step-up GPUs that are only $20 or so more than the previous GPU in the lineup, which makes it hard to pass up spending that $20 for that extra performance.

    If it's a toss-up between the 6870 and the 560 at $190 to $200, the 560 would get my vote. Just keep in mind that you can get almost as much performance from the GTX460-1GB for only $160.


    Well looks like I have two more questions (thanks for all your guys help btw) What is the difference between the 560 ti and the 560 and is it worth spending more for the 560? Im also looking at Evga 560/560 Ti's so If you can recommend a good EVGA 560/560 Ti model that would be excellent, Im a bit hesitant since there are a tonnes of selections.
  13. evga gtx 570 is 250$ at newegg.
  14. Funny manu... I can't find any 570's at Newegg for less than $310...

    The first page of this article goes a long way to explaining the major differences between the 560 and 560Ti. But the easiest way of explaining it is that the 560 is a slightly gimped version of the 560Ti. The 560Ti sports a GF114 model GPU, which is an improved version of the GF104 from the GTX460. Disable a small chunk of the GF114 GPU and what you then have left is the 560.

    When it comes to eVGA cards, I simply avoid any model that ends in -TR as they are typically the lower-end or most basic form of their offerings. Instead, I prefer those which end in -AR or -KR, which are usually superclocked or SSC models which carry a 3-year (-KR) or limited-lifetime (-AR) warranty. (In the US, that is.)

    Tough to resist the 560Ti when you know that the 560 is essentially a partially disabled 560Ti, huh? Especially when the price is only another $30... That's the point I made earlier. Cards in this performance range are within the price of a movie date of each other.
  15. RazberyBandit said:
    Funny manu... I can't find any 570's at Newegg for less than $310...

    The first page of this article goes a long way to explaining the major differences between the 560 and 560Ti. But the easiest way of explaining it is that the 560 is a slightly gimped version of the 560Ti. The 560Ti sports a GF114 model GPU, which is an improved version of the GF104 from the GTX460. Disable a small chunk of the GF114 GPU and what you then have left is the 560.

    When it comes to eVGA cards, I simply avoid any model that ends in -TR as they are typically the lower-end or most basic form of their offerings. Instead, I prefer those which end in -AR or -KR, which are usually superclocked or SSC models which carry a 3-year (-KR) or limited-lifetime (-AR) warranty. (In the US, that is.)

    Tough to resist the 560Ti when you know that the 560 is essentially a partially disabled 560Ti, huh? Especially when the price is only another $30... That's the point I made earlier. Cards in this performance range are within the price of a movie date of each other.


    Well looking through all the suggestions and options I had, I decided to with this http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814130651

    Although before I order Im curious to see why the model above is so much cheaper than this
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814130657

    They look exactly the same have the exact same specs yet ones 50 dollars cheaper.
    Don't get me wrong both cards are expensive but why is one so much cheaper for the exact same thing?

    Only difference I see is the more expensive one ends in AR the other cheaper KR and have different item numbers...
  16. It is -KR vs -AR. Basically, they want more money for the lifetime warrantied card - the -AR model. The suffixes of eVGA cards indicate their respective warranty coverage. Take a peek here to see all of eVGA's product number suffixes and their respective warranties.

    If a 3-year warranty isn't enough and you want a lifetime one, here's a -AR that's the same price as first card you linked. It does have a less-aggressive factory overclock, though: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814130604
  17. Wow thanks for the info, good to know it wasn;'t some hardware quality thing. Looks like this http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814130651 is going to be my new card, Can't wait to see the difference between that and the 8800 GT (Can't wait for direct X 11)
    Thanks everyone for helping me on this thread! looking forward to using my new graphics card!
  18. funny razbery, here is the link, and yeah, please do some research before commenting.
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814130688
  19. Dkt3 said:
    Hey

    I am thinking of replacing my 8800GT graphics card and I was wondering if there were any good graphic cards for under 250$. I have been searching and so many results come up Im unsure which ones are good and which cards are bad. I have been considering ATI since they are cheap but is ATI compatible with an Intel processor? Probably a noob question but Im going to ask anyway. Thanks

    Dkt



    You're obviously into an area of opinions so here's mine. Years ago I used several ATI boards and always found their drivers very buggy so I quit them for Nvidia and have been satisfied with the outcome. Since AMD bought ATI I decided to try another ATI/AMD board but found the drivers to be as buggy as ever. Once again I've switched back and noticed the difference immediately. Your $250 will buy a very high performance board. I suggest it should be an Nvidia based upon my experience. Whatever it is it will play every game I know of at or near max settings because games today are dumbed down to run on consoles which are running 5 year old graphics systems and CPUs. Now someone will read my answer and respond that Nvidia also has driver issues. They are correct. Everybody has driver issues occasionally. With AMD/ATI, bugs are the rule rather than the exception and often go uncorrected. Again, these are my opinions based upon my experiences. I have no vested interest in Nvidia.
  20. Oh yes one more question..Does it matter what type of motherboard you have BTX or ATX to be compatible with your graphics card?
  21. BTX or ATX makes no difference as long as you have a PCIe x16 slot (preferably a v2.0 one). The slot below must be unoccupied because these cards are all double-slot.

    manu 11 said:
    funny razbery, here is the link, and yeah, please do some research before commenting.
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814130688

    I take it the link I provided to all of Newegg's 570's sorted by price was enough research then? That's not a brand new card, it's re-certified. There's an inherent risk that accompanies re-certified product purchases because they've all been sold (at least once) previously, then returned for some reason. Having had a few GPUs die a year or two into their lifespan, and with how temperamental GPUs can be in general, I wouldn't recommend someone buy an expensive, high-performance, enthusiast-level product that doesn't have a full warranty. That goes double for an eVGA card that likely used to carry a lifetime warranty. If eVGA doesn't have enough faith in their own re-certification process to offer more than 90-days warranty on a card that once had a lifetime warranty, then consumers shouldn't either.
  22. Well My cards expected to come today any last minute tips before I install it on to my PC this is a first for me. I know I have 2 6 pin power cables, I have a PCI-E 2 Slot am I good to go?
  23. Probably, provided your PSU is capable enough to accommodate it. You may as well download the latest drivers for the card ahead of time.

    http://www.nvidia.com/Download/index.aspx?lang=en-us
  24. I have an 1kW Power supply so I should be okay. Good idea to download the drivers first..
  25. 1kW? Damn. Kinda overkill for a C2D + 8800GT system... But yeah, you should be OK. :)
  26. Well Installed the graphics card today, Face palmed because I didn't know XP wasn't compatible with direct X 11 other than that its excellent and quiet.
  27. Heh. Yeah... Only Vista (w/ the platform update) and Win 7 support Direct X 11. I'm glad it's working and I hope you enjoy it.

    Good luck!
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