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Looking for advice on customizing a prebuilt model.

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September 8, 2011 7:41:20 PM

http://ironsidecomputers.com/index.php?main_page=produc...

I've upgraded to the GTX 560ti, but I want to keep my budget around $1200. Would it be worth configuring the processor to an i7-2600? Also, with these specs, could I expect reasonable longevity for my gaming needs (I mostly dabble in MMOs, so I'd like some room for flexibility, but I'd probably be sticking with LotRO and Call of Duty) and consistent mid-range performance?
September 8, 2011 8:19:58 PM

For gaming the I5 2500K is equal to the 2600K at present.
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September 8, 2011 8:29:11 PM

So, with the specified specs and the GTX 560ti, could I expect reasonable performance from this system? It's not state-of-the-art, but for a prebuilt it looks like it has some longevity for the kind of games I would be playing (LotRO, early CoD, etc).
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September 8, 2011 8:40:15 PM

Yes.
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September 8, 2011 8:42:14 PM

Would you recommend any further modifications from their options? Cooling, mobo, harddrive, etc? Or are the defaults more than sufficient, with perhaps just a little flexibility for the future?
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September 8, 2011 10:34:31 PM

Hi, everyone.

I'm more or less done with configuring my model, but I was concerned about compatability. I've gone with a Cooler Master branded heatsink, but due to the size of most of their heatsinks I'm worried about cracking due to issues of incompatability with the case. According to Cooler Master's website (http://www.coolermaster.com/product.php?product_id=3263), the GeminII S supports an Intel i5 processor, but according to another page I've seen it supports Intel i7. Am I stretching the bounds of the core i5 model by the modifications I have made?

At even a cursory glance, do these specs seem compatable?

Case - IN WIN Fanqua Black (Mid Tower)
Intel Processor - Intel Core i5-2500 3.3GHz, 3.7GHz Turbo Boost (Quad Core)
CPU Cooling - COOLER MASTER GeminII S
Intel Motherboard - Asrock H61M/U3S3 [HDMI DVI] SATA 6Gb/s USB3 {2 DDR3 Slots Max 1333MHz}
Overclocking - [FREE] Overclock Processor up to 10%
Memory - 8GB (2x4GB) DDR3 1333MHz
Primary Hard Drive - Corsair Force 60GB SSD Read: 285MB/s Write: 275MB/s
Secondary Hard Drive - None
1st Optical Drive - Blu-Ray Reader / DVD Writer
2nd Optical Drive - None
Graphics Card - Nvidia Geforce GTX 560 Ti 1GB (Min. 600 Watt Power Supply)
Power Supply - Standard 700 Watt
Operating System - Windows 7 Home Premium 64 Bit
Networking - Standard Onboard Ethernet
Media Card Readers - All-in-one Card Reader
Office Software - None
Sound Card - Integrated HD Audio
TV Tuners - None
Fan Controller - NZX Sentry 2 Touch Screen Fan Controller & Temperature Display

Here's a link to the case and its specs:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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September 8, 2011 10:54:41 PM

matthewjer18 said:
Hi, everyone.

I'm more or less done with configuring my model, but I was concerned about compatability. I've gone with a Cooler Master branded heatsink, but due to the size of most of their heatsinks I'm worried about cracking due to issues of incompatability with the case. According to Cooler Master's website (http://www.coolermaster.com/product.php?product_id=3263), the GeminII S supports an Intel i5 processor, but according to another page I've seen it supports Intel i7. Am I stretching the bounds of the core i5 model by the modifications I have made?

At even a cursory glance, do these specs seem compatable?

Case - IN WIN Fanqua Black (Mid Tower)
Intel Processor - Intel Core i5-2500 3.3GHz, 3.7GHz Turbo Boost (Quad Core)
CPU Cooling - COOLER MASTER GeminII S
Intel Motherboard - Asrock H61M/U3S3 [HDMI DVI] SATA 6Gb/s USB3 {2 DDR3 Slots Max 1333MHz}
Overclocking - [FREE] Overclock Processor up to 10%
Memory - 8GB (2x4GB) DDR3 1333MHz
Primary Hard Drive - Corsair Force 60GB SSD Read: 285MB/s Write: 275MB/s
Secondary Hard Drive - None
1st Optical Drive - Blu-Ray Reader / DVD Writer
2nd Optical Drive - None
Graphics Card - Nvidia Geforce GTX 560 Ti 1GB (Min. 600 Watt Power Supply)
Power Supply - Standard 700 Watt
Operating System - Windows 7 Home Premium 64 Bit
Networking - Standard Onboard Ethernet
Media Card Readers - All-in-one Card Reader
Office Software - None
Sound Card - Integrated HD Audio
TV Tuners - None
Fan Controller - NZX Sentry 2 Touch Screen Fan Controller & Temperature Display

Here's a link to the case and its specs:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


Are you building it yourself, part by part?
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September 9, 2011 5:58:38 PM

Nope, I don't build. I've gone with a company that builds on your behalf with what you specify, but they don't seem to have an auto warning if you choose parts that may not be compatable. However, they do ship the system there and back for replacing if it doesn't work out of the box due to incompatability issues.

Would the above specs be compatable - specifically, the case/i5 with the heatsink?
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September 9, 2011 6:05:10 PM

matthewjer18 said:
Nope, I don't build. I've gone with a company that builds on your behalf with what you specify, but they don't seem to have an auto warning if you choose parts that may not be compatable. However, they do ship the system there and back for replacing if it doesn't work out of the box due to incompatability issues.

Would the above specs be compatable - specifically, the case/i5 with the heatsink?

That cooler should fit all mid tower cases.
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September 9, 2011 6:19:16 PM

It is very easy to build it yourself and you can get aobut double the quality for almost half the price. I would reccommend trying to build it yourself. There are less than like 20 screws for everything and most new cases make installation dummy proof.
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September 10, 2011 7:00:15 PM

the system you are going to build can be most stable and always(2+ years) upgradable if you buy a z68 motherboard from gigabyte it also the recommend buy from toms hardware .core i5 is a very good processor from gaming to office works kepping only a ssd hdd is not a good idea even if you only want to play games some games like gta4 can lengthy as 18gb+ so that you wont be able to play more than 3 or 4 games.if money is not a problem for you i can suggest you to buy a 10000rpm scsi hdd which sometimes used by game developers.but ssd is not bad if you have a 7200rpm hdd aside.to choose the best grafics card is almost impossible but the best way to buy it is,buying the card which is not brand new and also very old model gtx 460 is the best for money.geforce is preferred because it has some very good features that ati do not have.spending too much on graphics card is not good because with that money you can buy abetter one just 1 year later. so good luck for your buying
dont forget to tell me if your problem is solved.

nibir2011
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September 10, 2011 7:42:17 PM

+1 Nibir2011

"Primary Hard Drive - Corsair Force 60GB SSD Read: 285MB/s Write: 275MB/s
Secondary Hard Drive - None "

This won't work. You have two major options. (1) keep the ssd and add a 1TB fast spinning hard drive ($50 to $100) or (2) drop the SSD and just go for a very fast spinning drive (1.5 TB WD black $150). If you keep the SSDs then you have to make sure all games, etc, install on the 2nd disk. The 60GB SSD will only hold a few games. the $50 1.5TB drive is 1500GB is 20 times bigger than the ssd.

re "Overclocking - [FREE] Overclock Processor up to 10% " Make sure that they set up a normal, non-overclocked profile that you can use and that you know how to switch between the OC and normal profiles. Sometimes people disable speedstep and turbo-boost when overclocking which means that you use much more power when surfing the web, etc. A 10% overclock is what turbo-boost from 3.4 to 3.7 gives you...

Intel Core i5-2500 -- if you are going to overclock consider an i5-2500K instead of i5-2500 to get the unlocked multipliers. But the i5-2500 is so fast without an overclock you might prefer to just stay stock clock or with the 10% base clock overclock they are doing for you.
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September 10, 2011 8:59:53 PM

oh came across this interesting append. http://hardforum.com/showthread.php?t=1576652

"Right guys myself and our technical guys have spent the entire weekend and this morning in discussions with Intel regarding the alarming amount of reports of Sandybridge CPU's dying and have been conducting our own testing as have Intel to find out what is a definite no no."

"Core Voltage - Not recommended too exceed 1.38v, doing so could kill the CPU, we therefor recommend a range of 1.325-1.350v if overclocking.
Memory Voltage - Intel recommend 1.50v plus/minus 5% which means upto 1.58v is the safe recommended limit. In our testing we have found 1.65v has caused no issues.
BCLK Base Clock - This is strictly a NO, anyone using base clock overclocking could/will cause damange to CPU/Mainboard. (Set manually to 100)
PLL Voltage - Do not exceed 1.9v!!"

Be interesting to see how you are getting a 10% oveclock on the i5-2500... bclk ?

p.s. the guys in the appends seem to have a good attitude.... "These are just guidelines we recommend you follow, if you want to push more voltage through your CPU's then just be aware they could die on you. Your warranty is un-affected and we will honor any CPU's that die, we just won't ask questions as to how you killed them."
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!