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Back up your Files !!!

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Anonymous
March 30, 2005 11:54:32 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

When I got my new computer last year, I made sure to get a DVD burner
so i could make backups of all my digital photos.
Well, I've been farting around and I've only managed to make 3 DVDs
full so far, but that only gets me to about 2003.

As a precautionary measure, I backed up up my photos to a different
hard drive. I did this when I got back from Hawaii in October. I keep
my downloaded pics on my "D" drive and I copied them over to the "E"
drive as a temporary backup.

Well guess what happened this week? My "D" drive is shot!
Too much dust, I think. It gives the dreaded "tick of death" and
Windows won't recognize it as a formatted drive. I'm screwed.
Fortunately, only the photos I've taken since October/2004 are all gone
and it's been a slow Winter.

Any suggestions on how to recover the data from the bad drive?
I know there are places that do that kind of thing, but most of them
are expensive. Someone suggested Partition Magic, but I don't know if
that program will do what I want. I just want to get the files off the
drive before scrapping it.

More about : back files

Anonymous
March 31, 2005 12:52:02 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Annika1980" <annika1980@aol.com> wrote in message
news:1112241272.695170.23030@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
> When I got my new computer last year, I made sure to get a DVD burner
> so i could make backups of all my digital photos.
> Well, I've been farting around and I've only managed to make 3 DVDs
> full so far, but that only gets me to about 2003.
>
> As a precautionary measure, I backed up up my photos to a different
> hard drive. I did this when I got back from Hawaii in October. I keep
> my downloaded pics on my "D" drive and I copied them over to the "E"
> drive as a temporary backup.
>
> Well guess what happened this week? My "D" drive is shot!
> Too much dust, I think. It gives the dreaded "tick of death" and
> Windows won't recognize it as a formatted drive. I'm screwed.
> Fortunately, only the photos I've taken since October/2004 are all gone
> and it's been a slow Winter.
>
> Any suggestions on how to recover the data from the bad drive?
> I know there are places that do that kind of thing, but most of them
> are expensive. Someone suggested Partition Magic, but I don't know if
> that program will do what I want. I just want to get the files off the
> drive before scrapping it.

I just lost two main C drives in the last 6 weeks myself!
Ouch.
I'm finally about done installing my programs and tweaks, etc., for the
THIRD time now.
Sorry about your drive...

You MAY be able to access SOME files from that drive after installing a new
drive and Windows...then hooking in your old drive as an additional drive.
I did this with my first failed drive and was able to retrieve my very full
in-box file (which is important, because it had all my software codes, etc.
and contact info, etc.).

Try it.
I even managed to do this same thing on the SECOND failed hard drive even
though it failed due to SEVERE overheating.
I've spent the last few days building a HUGE new system using mostly my
existing stuff. I have 6 hard drives including 5 internals drives and 1
external...for a total of 1.3 TERAbytes of storage.
Most of these drives are used up with tripple redundancy, and I'm installing
a RAID array this week.

I hope you're able to retrieve your photos.
I know I would be heartbroken to lose mine...

Do try accessing the drives again once you install Windows on a new one.
You may be pleasantly surprised.

-Mark
Anonymous
March 31, 2005 8:21:44 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 30 Mar 2005 19:54:32 -0800, in rec.photo.digital , "Annika1980"
<annika1980@aol.com> in
<1112241272.695170.23030@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com> wrote:

>When I got my new computer last year, I made sure to get a DVD burner
>so i could make backups of all my digital photos.
>Well, I've been farting around and I've only managed to make 3 DVDs
>full so far, but that only gets me to about 2003.
>
>As a precautionary measure, I backed up up my photos to a different
>hard drive. I did this when I got back from Hawaii in October. I keep
>my downloaded pics on my "D" drive and I copied them over to the "E"
>drive as a temporary backup.
>
>Well guess what happened this week? My "D" drive is shot!
>Too much dust, I think. It gives the dreaded "tick of death" and
>Windows won't recognize it as a formatted drive. I'm screwed.
>Fortunately, only the photos I've taken since October/2004 are all gone
>and it's been a slow Winter.
>
>Any suggestions on how to recover the data from the bad drive?
>I know there are places that do that kind of thing, but most of them
>are expensive. Someone suggested Partition Magic, but I don't know if
>that program will do what I want. I just want to get the files off the
>drive before scrapping it.

Try Spinrite, www.grc.com


--
Matt Silberstein

All in all, if I could be any animal, I would want to be
a duck or a goose. They can fly, walk, and swim. Plus,
there there is a certain satisfaction knowing that at the
end of your life you will taste good with an orange sauce
or, in the case of a goose, a chestnut stuffing.
Related resources
Anonymous
March 31, 2005 9:21:39 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

MarkĀ² wrote:

> "Annika1980" <annika1980@aol.com> wrote in message
> news:1112241272.695170.23030@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
>
>>When I got my new computer last year, I made sure to get a DVD burner
>>so i could make backups of all my digital photos.
>>Well, I've been farting around and I've only managed to make 3 DVDs
>>full so far, but that only gets me to about 2003.
>>
>>As a precautionary measure, I backed up up my photos to a different
>>hard drive. I did this when I got back from Hawaii in October. I keep
>>my downloaded pics on my "D" drive and I copied them over to the "E"
>>drive as a temporary backup.
>>
>>Well guess what happened this week? My "D" drive is shot!
>>Too much dust, I think. It gives the dreaded "tick of death" and
>>Windows won't recognize it as a formatted drive. I'm screwed.
>>Fortunately, only the photos I've taken since October/2004 are all gone
>>and it's been a slow Winter.
>>
>>Any suggestions on how to recover the data from the bad drive?
>>I know there are places that do that kind of thing, but most of them
>>are expensive. Someone suggested Partition Magic, but I don't know if
>>that program will do what I want. I just want to get the files off the
>>drive before scrapping it.
>
>
> I just lost two main C drives in the last 6 weeks myself!
> Ouch.
> I'm finally about done installing my programs and tweaks, etc., for the
> THIRD time now.
> Sorry about your drive...
>
> You MAY be able to access SOME files from that drive after installing a new
> drive and Windows...then hooking in your old drive as an additional drive.
> I did this with my first failed drive and was able to retrieve my very full
> in-box file (which is important, because it had all my software codes, etc.
> and contact info, etc.).
>
> Try it.
> I even managed to do this same thing on the SECOND failed hard drive even
> though it failed due to SEVERE overheating.
> I've spent the last few days building a HUGE new system using mostly my
> existing stuff. I have 6 hard drives including 5 internals drives and 1
> external...for a total of 1.3 TERAbytes of storage.
> Most of these drives are used up with tripple redundancy, and I'm installing
> a RAID array this week.
>
> I hope you're able to retrieve your photos.
> I know I would be heartbroken to lose mine...
>
> Do try accessing the drives again once you install Windows on a new one.
> You may be pleasantly surprised.
>
> -Mark

Hi...

And to add to that... even if the operating system doesn't
install the "broken" drive as a logical drive (ie - give it
a drive letter), then it's still possible that you may be
able to read it as a physical device (ie - via api calls)

At that point, if something on it - an irreplacable picture - is
precious enough, and you're willing to work long and hard enough at
it - you can recover it.

Take care.

Ken
Anonymous
March 31, 2005 10:29:54 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I agree that you should try using the drive with a new Windows
installation. However, instead of installing it in your computer
(requiring its removal if it doesn't work or you simply want to replace
it) I would urge you to get a USB connector or, if you are feeling a
tad more flush, an enclosure, from eBay. That will keep it external and
highly disposable. Both are inexpensive and you can always meet future
need by connecting a new hd to one for future backup and archiving.

This also opens up the option of simply taking your new setup to a
friend's computer to check it out. Quick and easy. All that's needed is
a USB port and someone running XP or 2000 (Win 98 would require
installing a driver -- easy enough as well).
March 31, 2005 11:46:11 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

MarkĀ² wrote:
>
> You MAY be able to access SOME files from that drive after installing a new
> drive and Windows...then hooking in your old drive as an additional drive.


Yes, it might just be a bad boot sector. I've recovered stuff this way.
Anonymous
March 31, 2005 1:15:35 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I've used a program called Recover It All Pro several times, and it works
very nicely, as long as the drive will spin up. The interface is a little
obtuse, but it does the job for short money.

http://www.dtidata.com/data_recovery_software.htm

If that doesn't work, companies like Drive Savers will get the data, but
you'll pay dearly. Last drive I sent to them was over $1K to recover the
data. (www.drivesavers.com)

The data is not lost, it's just a matter of the best and cheapest method to
retrieve. Barring physical damage, pretty much anything can be recovered.

"Annika1980" <annika1980@aol.com> wrote in message
news:1112241272.695170.23030@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
> When I got my new computer last year, I made sure to get a DVD burner
> so i could make backups of all my digital photos.
> Well, I've been farting around and I've only managed to make 3 DVDs
> full so far, but that only gets me to about 2003.
>
> As a precautionary measure, I backed up up my photos to a different
> hard drive. I did this when I got back from Hawaii in October. I keep
> my downloaded pics on my "D" drive and I copied them over to the "E"
> drive as a temporary backup.
>
> Well guess what happened this week? My "D" drive is shot!
> Too much dust, I think. It gives the dreaded "tick of death" and
> Windows won't recognize it as a formatted drive. I'm screwed.
> Fortunately, only the photos I've taken since October/2004 are all gone
> and it's been a slow Winter.
>
> Any suggestions on how to recover the data from the bad drive?
> I know there are places that do that kind of thing, but most of them
> are expensive. Someone suggested Partition Magic, but I don't know if
> that program will do what I want. I just want to get the files off the
> drive before scrapping it.
>
Anonymous
March 31, 2005 2:42:47 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 19:54:32 -0800, Annika1980 wrote:
<SNIP>
> Any suggestions on how to recover the data from the bad drive?
> I know there are places that do that kind of thing, but most of them
> are expensive. Someone suggested Partition Magic, but I don't know if
> that program will do what I want. I just want to get the files off the
> drive before scrapping it.

If you're somewhat savvy with Linux you can try using Knoppix or another
Live CD operating system. It'll boot off the CD without touching your
drives and you can try recovery from there. Linux can read NTFS drives
perfectly well. I recovered quite a few drives this way that wouldn't show
up at all when used in Windows.

Bas
Anonymous
April 1, 2005 3:30:21 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <1112241272.695170.23030@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>,
"Annika1980" <annika1980@aol.com> wrote:

> When I got my new computer last year, I made sure to get a DVD burner
> so i could make backups of all my digital photos.
> Well, I've been farting around and I've only managed to make 3 DVDs
> full so far, but that only gets me to about 2003.
>
> As a precautionary measure, I backed up up my photos to a different
> hard drive. I did this when I got back from Hawaii in October. I keep
> my downloaded pics on my "D" drive and I copied them over to the "E"
> drive as a temporary backup.
>
> Well guess what happened this week? My "D" drive is shot!
> Too much dust, I think. It gives the dreaded "tick of death" and
> Windows won't recognize it as a formatted drive. I'm screwed.
> Fortunately, only the photos I've taken since October/2004 are all gone
> and it's been a slow Winter.
>
> Any suggestions on how to recover the data from the bad drive?
> I know there are places that do that kind of thing, but most of them
> are expensive. Someone suggested Partition Magic, but I don't know if
> that program will do what I want. I just want to get the files off the
> drive before scrapping it.

Next time buy 2 identical drives and set them up as RAID. Only one icon
will appear on the desktop and when you save they'll go on both drives.

Maybe I can feel lucky I only have a CDRW drive, which means i only get
150 pictures on a 700mb CDR - still the next $700 pooter I buy will have
a superdrive.
Anonymous
April 1, 2005 12:39:50 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Annika1980 wrote:

> When I got my new computer last year, I made sure to get a DVD burner
> so i could make backups of all my digital photos.
> Well, I've been farting around and I've only managed to make 3 DVDs
> full so far, but that only gets me to about 2003.

Is the disk spinning up? If not, remove the drive from the case, but
leave the cables attached. As you power up the computer, hold the drive
in your hand and rapidly rotate the drive chassis back and forth around
the spidle axis. This should overcome any stiction and get the platters
spinning.

Friendly suggestion: spend less time spamming R.P.35mm with your
digipics, and spend more running your DVD recorder! :p  :) 

-Greg
Anonymous
April 1, 2005 5:40:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Fri, 01 Apr 2005 08:39:50 -0700, Greg Campbell wrote:

> Is the disk spinning up? If not, remove the drive from the case, but
> leave the cables attached. As you power up the computer, hold the drive
> in your hand and rapidly rotate the drive chassis back and forth around
> the spidle axis. This should overcome any stiction and get the platters
> spinning.

Really? The last drives plagues with "stiction" that I'm aware of
were the old 5 1/4" half-height Shugart MFM and RLL 20 and 40 MB
drives. Anything's worth a try, I suppose. I've also heard people
recommend chilling unreadable CD discs and non-functioning hard
drives in a freezer. I tried it once with a CD and it didn't help
any. Spin-Rite has helped with hard drive and floppy disk errors,
but its success rate, for me anyway, has been a somewhat lower than
50%.
April 2, 2005 12:58:48 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

ASAAR wrote:

> Really? The last drives plagues with "stiction" that I'm aware of
> were the old 5 1/4" half-height Shugart MFM and RLL 20 and 40 MB
> drives.

Used to be a problem with the drives supplied with the SGI Indigo2.
2GB 3+1/2" SCSI as I recall. There was a patch for IRIX that caused
it to do things at shutdown to reduce the risk of the disk getting
stuck. Recommended procedure for recovery was to take the drive out,
torque it, then quickly clip it back in and power up. Worked for me.

- Len
Anonymous
April 3, 2005 11:40:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Leonard <user@example.net> writes:

>Used to be a problem with the drives supplied with the SGI Indigo2.
>2GB 3+1/2" SCSI as I recall. There was a patch for IRIX that caused
>it to do things at shutdown to reduce the risk of the disk getting
>stuck. Recommended procedure for recovery was to take the drive out,
>torque it, then quickly clip it back in and power up. Worked for me.

I have a 4 GB Seagate Barracuda that's reluctant to start up if it
hasn't been used for a while. Whacking the case in a direction that
rotates the drive around the spindle axis has always been able to free
it (so far).

Dave
Anonymous
April 3, 2005 11:56:50 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Sun, 3 Apr 2005 19:40:27 +0000 (UTC), in rec.photo.digital
davem@cs.ubc.ca (Dave Martindale) wrote:

>I have a 4 GB Seagate Barracuda that's reluctant to start up if it
>hasn't been used for a while. Whacking the case in a direction that
>rotates the drive around the spindle axis has always been able to free
>it (so far).

This is an old Seagate issue with their scsi drives we've used on unix
systems at work over the years. A sign to make sure your data is backed up
elsewhere.
----------
Ed Ruf Lifetime AMA# 344007 (Usenet@EdwardG.Ruf.com)
See images taken with my CP-990/5700 & D70 at
http://edwardgruf.com/Digital_Photography/General/index...
Anonymous
April 4, 2005 3:00:29 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Sun, 3 Apr 2005 19:40:27 +0000 (UTC), Dave Martindale wrote:

> I have a 4 GB Seagate Barracuda that's reluctant to start up if it
> hasn't been used for a while. Whacking the case in a direction that
> rotates the drive around the spindle axis has always been able to free
> it (so far).

I also had a Barracuda several years ago that wouldn't start up,
but it must have been a different problem. It made a strange sound,
an initial loud click followed by several weaker ones, sort of like
throwing a ball bearing at a wall (the initial click) followed by
multiple, closely spaced clicks as if the ball bounced away on the
floor. I tried the torque-slap for old times sake but it didn't
help.
Anonymous
April 4, 2005 9:18:30 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

reply@tueue.com.invalid writes:

> I also had a Barracuda several years ago that wouldn't start up,
>but it must have been a different problem. It made a strange sound,
>an initial loud click followed by several weaker ones, sort of like
>throwing a ball bearing at a wall (the initial click) followed by
>multiple, closely spaced clicks as if the ball bounced away on the
>floor. I tried the torque-slap for old times sake but it didn't
>help.

Sounds like you may have been hearing a deliberate positioner "buzz".
If the drive motor doesn't start on its own, the Barracuda tries moving
the positioner back and forth rapidly a short distance in order to
break things free. It tries 2 or 3 increasing amplitudes of this before
giving up. If the drive's problem is that the heads are sticking to the
platters, moving the heads may unstick it. This is something the drive
firmware tries as a last resort.

In the case of my Barracuda, it was probably spindle bearings that were
sticking, not the heads, because the buzz never seemed to free it. But
smartly whacking the case in the appropriate direction always succeeded
(sometimes several tries were needed).

But this drive has now been retired from service. Someday I'll take it
apart to see how they got 11 platters in that space.

Dave
Anonymous
April 4, 2005 3:30:50 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Sun, 3 Apr 2005 19:40:27 +0000 (UTC), davem@cs.ubc.ca (Dave
Martindale) wrote:

>Leonard <user@example.net> writes:
>
>>Used to be a problem with the drives supplied with the SGI Indigo2.
>>2GB 3+1/2" SCSI as I recall. There was a patch for IRIX that caused
>>it to do things at shutdown to reduce the risk of the disk getting
>>stuck. Recommended procedure for recovery was to take the drive out,
>>torque it, then quickly clip it back in and power up. Worked for me.
>
>I have a 4 GB Seagate Barracuda that's reluctant to start up if it
>hasn't been used for a while. Whacking the case in a direction that
>rotates the drive around the spindle axis has always been able to free
>it (so far).
>
> Dave

It would seem to me that, if you know it's having problems, replacing
it with a newer drive would be a very smart thing to do.
4 GB? Do you have an emotional attachment to it? :-)

--
Bill Funk
Change "g" to "a"
Anonymous
April 4, 2005 3:32:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Mon, 4 Apr 2005 05:18:30 +0000 (UTC), davem@cs.ubc.ca (Dave
Martindale) wrote:

>reply@tueue.com.invalid writes:
>
>> I also had a Barracuda several years ago that wouldn't start up,
>>but it must have been a different problem. It made a strange sound,
>>an initial loud click followed by several weaker ones, sort of like
>>throwing a ball bearing at a wall (the initial click) followed by
>>multiple, closely spaced clicks as if the ball bounced away on the
>>floor. I tried the torque-slap for old times sake but it didn't
>>help.
>
>Sounds like you may have been hearing a deliberate positioner "buzz".
>If the drive motor doesn't start on its own, the Barracuda tries moving
>the positioner back and forth rapidly a short distance in order to
>break things free. It tries 2 or 3 increasing amplitudes of this before
>giving up. If the drive's problem is that the heads are sticking to the
>platters, moving the heads may unstick it. This is something the drive
>firmware tries as a last resort.

Doesn't this drag the heads across the platter (if it works), ruining
that part it scratches?
>
>In the case of my Barracuda, it was probably spindle bearings that were
>sticking, not the heads, because the buzz never seemed to free it. But
>smartly whacking the case in the appropriate direction always succeeded
>(sometimes several tries were needed).
>
>But this drive has now been retired from service. Someday I'll take it
>apart to see how they got 11 platters in that space.
>
> Dave

--
Bill Funk
Change "g" to "a"
Anonymous
April 4, 2005 4:04:21 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Mon, 4 Apr 2005 05:18:30 +0000 (UTC), Dave Martindale wrote:

> But this drive has now been retired from service. Someday I'll take
> it apart to see how they got 11 platters in that space.

It might be worth it if the internal magnets are as strong as a
few that I removed from full height 5 1/4" drives. Three or four of
them would probably be sufficient to keep me suspended off the
ground. They can be quite dangerous if you aren't careful while
holding them.
!