$600 PC - Gaming, Internet, Photoshop

Hi all,
Recently I decided to switch my iMac and the family iMac to W7 machines. Thanks to everyone who helped me create a build to replace the 27 inch 2011 iMac.

Now I have $600 to work with that I got for selling an iMac 20 inch 2008 core 2 duo 2.4ghz with ati 4250 and 4gb ram

I am looking into building a PC with a $600 budget. Mouse/keyboard are needed - Speakers, monitor, OS are not needed.

It will be used for gaming, (It doesn't really need to max BF3, but the primary person that games on it plays stuff like Dirt 3 and Burnout Paradise)

Web browsing/document processing

And some photoshop

I already have a dvd drive.

Thanks everyone for the help
13 answers Last reply
More about gaming internet photoshop
  1. So, to sum up, $600 for:

    case
    PSU
    CPU
    mobo
    RAM
    video card
    hard drive

    Anything else?

    I'd get an i3-2100 CPU ($125) .
    Almost a quarter of your budget, but warranted, I think.
    [And I've been an AMD booster for most of the past decade.]

    Budget $50 for board-supported RAM
    (I leave looking that up as an exercise for the reader.)

    $150 for PSU & case. DO NOT SKIMP HERE.
    (I'm still using the same basic but quality cases
    that I bought 5 & 10 years ago for ~$50 & $80.)

    Here's a quality, cost-effective PSU:
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817371016

    and a couple of serviceable Antec cases:
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811129042
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811129066

    [Yes, I'm an Antec fan ... ]

    To save some money, you may wish to check out
    the case/PSU combos:
    http://www.newegg.com/Store/ComboDeals.aspx?ComboStoreID=5&name=Power-Supplies-Cases

    That leaves $275 for mobo, card & hd.
    $75 for an HDD. You can go for max performance,
    go green, or opt for more storage. All will work:

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822136319
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822136498
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822152185

    That leaves ~$200 for card & mobo.
    Here's an MSI P67 board for $90:
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813130576.

    So, you've got $100+ to use on a video card, with any excess
    to devote to case & PSU or motherboard.
    [I know nothing about video cards or gaming, so I leave
    that recommendation to someone knowledgeable.
    Just read up to ensure that the card you choose
    adequately supports the games you'll be playing.]

    The key, IMHO, is balance.
    And always read the product reviews, critically,
    to avoid avoidable 'gotchas'.

    Make sense?

    - Richard
  2. Case
    PSU
    CPU
    Mobo
    Gpu
    HDD
    Keyboard (just realized I already have a mouse)
    Ram
  3. Keyboard -- up to you. VERY personal preference.

    FWIW, I bought this keyboard a year or two ago.
    It's definitely clackety, but I like its feel more than any keyboard I've touched in the past decade (other than the much more expensive Lenovo boards):

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16823155013

    P.S. - Please note that I updated my initial reply with specifics after your 2nd post.
  4. Antec 300 - $70
    XFX Core edition 550w - $70
    i3-2100 - $125
    Gigabyte GA-P61-USB3 - $70
    Corsair 4gb 1600 - $33
    Sapphire Radeon 6750 1gb GDDR5 - $106
    Seagate 500gb HDD - $40
    Win 7 Home Prem 64 - $100
    =$614 minus about $25 in rebates.

    Keyboard is gonna have to be cheap! ;)

    (prices from newegg)
  5. OP should be okay ... already has the OS.
  6. If i take fadeawayyx's build, take out the OS and put in a i5 2400 instead of the i3 2100, will everything be compatible and will the PSU be able to still handle it? I assume so, I am just making sure.
  7. Thanks expat for the build. It looks really good, except there is one thing that bothers me about both builds posted - I feel like even an i5 2400 will remain very fast well into the future, while the dual core will start showing its age a lot sooner. It looks like it is roughly a $55 difference - Is it worth spending a bit less on some other parts to get the quad core i5?
  8. Should be, however I went for a H61 because it doesn't overclock (or not very well) - which fits in fine with the i3-2100 which can't oc anyway.
    If you're going i5-k, pick a better mboard. If you're just going i5-2400 then sure stick with the h61.
    I'd put the extra $100 into a better gpu since you won't be able to get z68+i5-2500k upgrade.
  9. What fadeawayyx said.
    It gets back to that BALANCE issue.
    For gaming, my sense is that the GPU is as important as the CPU.

    And if you're considering the i5-2400, I'd scrape up $30 more
    & get the i5-2500K which, by all accounts, is a MUCH better CPU.
  10. And if you're considering the i5-2400, I'd scrape up $30 more
    & get the i5-2500K which, by all accounts, is a MUCH better CPU.

    _______________________________________________________

    Well, I don't really see myself over-clocking the machine. What are the benefits of the 2500k as opposed to the 2400? $30 is a lot to pay for a difference of .2 ghz, isn't it?
  11. apple2000 said:
    And if you're considering the i5-2400, I'd scrape up $30 more
    & get the i5-2500K which, by all accounts, is a MUCH better CPU.

    _______________________________________________________

    Well, I don't really see myself over-clocking the machine. What are the benefits of the 2500k as opposed to the 2400? $30 is a lot to pay for a difference of .2 ghz, isn't it?


    If not OC'ing then, yes, i5-2400 is probably the way to go.
  12. Alright. So is the build I posted a picture of on Newegg solid? I just want to make sure before I purchase it.
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