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[Memory] System wont start with my 4 DDR3 modules

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September 21, 2012 4:23:01 PM

Hi,

I have 4 memory modules DDR 3 PC3-10600 1333 MHz Cl9 (the reference is : 497157-d88 like this one : http://www.trademoon.com/497157-D88-Refurbished_p_16386...). There was in my HP Elite 7100MT and now i want to put them in another computer with this motherboard : AsRock H61DE/S3.

My problem is that if i put only 2 modules it starts but i put 4 modules the system wont start.

I tested with each one seperatly and all of them are working correctly.

Do you have a solution??

Thanks.
a b } Memory
September 21, 2012 8:01:29 PM

Just for shits and giggles, try one stick in each DIMM slot. For example:

[CPU] | _ _ _
[CPU] _ | _ _
[CPU] _ _ | _
[CPU] _ _ _ |
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September 22, 2012 7:34:20 AM

I tried that and the system starts fine. It works too if i use 2 sticks. But i add another one the system won't start.
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a b } Memory
September 22, 2012 7:53:56 AM

Had u try to run memtest (couple of run/cycle) with one stick of the time?



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a b } Memory
September 25, 2012 6:54:14 PM

Hmmm... Have you tried increasing your DIMM voltage?
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October 2, 2012 6:47:11 AM

rdc85 said:
Had u try to run memtest (couple of run/cycle) with one stick of the time?


All of them are fine
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October 2, 2012 6:47:31 AM

T_T said:
Hmmm... Have you tried increasing your DIMM voltage?


No, the voltage is set to Auto
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a b } Memory
October 5, 2012 8:55:03 PM

hdryx said:
No, the voltage is set to Auto


Go into your BIOS, and then slightly increase the voltage going to your DIMM slots. This is typically done in the DRAM voltage settings. By the way, when left on [Auto], your motherboard can and will fluctuate the voltage to save energy; and motherboards typically need a little extra voltage when occupying all DIMM slots. Start by manually setting your voltage to the voltage shown on the sticker affixed to your RAM modules. If still no boot, try increasing the voltage by ~.1.
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a b } Memory
October 5, 2012 9:33:54 PM

Another thing to try would be to under-clock your memory to 1066MT/s.

My guess is that the extra DIMMs add too much capacitive loading on the DIMM lines for the CPU/DIMMs to drive the lines reliably. Lowering frequency gives more time for line voltages to stabilize and might give you the little extra stability required to boot.
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a c 347 } Memory
October 5, 2012 10:06:19 PM

Okay, I've seen other off-spec Intel Chipset MOBO's before, and your ASRock H61DE/S3 is one of them, Gigabyte also manufactures a couple with 4xDIMM on the H61. By design the H61 allows for only 2xDIMM slots (fully purposed memory), but on 4xDIMM 'IF' you use SS (single rank) memory then you can have 4xSS or 2xDS configurations.

The reason 'most' MOBO's only manufacture 2xDIMM on their H61's and on other similar limiting chipset's is to avoid problems. Apparently, ASRock assumes you have read the fine print -- the purpose was to sell unsuspecting folks 4xDIMM H61's...

Page 19 of your manual - http://www.asrock.com/mb/overview.asp?cat=Manual&Model=...
Quote:
If you install four single-sided DIMMs on this motherboard, they will
run at DDR3 1066 only.

This motherboard supports two double-sided or four single-sided
DIMMs. Therefore, if you install four DDR3 DIMMs, you can only
adopt four single-sided DIMMs.


You can 'try' to set the DRAM Frequency -> DDR3-1066 and see if that works.

However, if it fails and your RAM is DS (Dual Rank) then no amount of voltage or tweaks is going to correct this limitation, so if you want 8GB of RAM then purchase a 2x4GB of DDR3-1333 RAM Kit, e.g. - $34 G.SKILL Value Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1333 (PC3 10600) Desktop Memory Model F3-10600CL9D-8GBNT - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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a b } Memory
October 5, 2012 10:32:03 PM

jaquith said:
By design the H61 allows for only 2xDIMM slots (fully purposed memory), but on 4xDIMM 'IF' you use SS (single rank) memory then you can have 4xSS or 2xDS configurations.

The memory controller is integrated in the LGA1155 CPU and the DIMMs are wired directly to the CPU so in principle, the chipset is completely irrelevant unless Intel is using a 'key' embedded into the chipset to enable/disable 4xDS DIMM support in the CPU.
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a c 347 } Memory
October 5, 2012 11:13:28 PM

InvalidError said:
The memory controller is integrated in the LGA1155 CPU and the DIMMs are wired directly to the CPU so in principle, the chipset is completely irrelevant unless Intel is using a 'key' embedded into the chipset to enable/disable 4xDS DIMM support in the CPU.

No, and example with the same argument-- why can't you OC a (K) CPU on the H61 -- answer that one.

Find me any H61 with 4xDIMM that doesn't have the same exact 4xSS or 2xDS limitation. Intel can control the CPU anyway it deems though its Intel Chipset.
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a b } Memory
October 6, 2012 12:23:11 AM

jaquith said:
No, and example with the same argument-- why can't you OC a (K) CPU on the H61 -- answer that one.

I already answered that.

The CPU has all the circuitry to support all those features (4xDS, x8x8 CFX/SLI, OC, etc.) regardless of what chipset is used. Intel is just being greedy and put a lock-out feature (a sort of license) in their chipset to arbitrarily disable CPU features to prevent manufacturers from building overclockable SLI boards using B75 even though the CPU has all required circuitry and the chipset physically has absolutely nothing to do with those features just because Intel arbitrarily decided that B75 shall not be associated with enthusiast boards.

This could be summed up as: Intel is being greedy and the lock-out feature is being used to force upselling chipsets.
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a c 347 } Memory
October 6, 2012 2:35:33 AM

InvalidError said:
This could be summed up as: Intel is being greedy and the lock-out feature is being used to force upselling chipsets.

You were arguing with 'me' about something Intel did -- like I have something to do with it.

If folks don't like the limits on anything then choose something else, the cost between chipsets is very small. It's all the other stuff that adds cost.
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a b } Memory
October 6, 2012 4:07:59 AM

jaquith said:
If folks don't like the limits on anything then choose something else, the cost between chipsets is very small. It's all the other stuff that adds cost.

What other stuff?

Hardware-wise, just about every motherboard manufacturer makes plain-vanilla b75, h77, z75 and z77 boards that have absolutely no other features than what is integrated in the CPU+chipset. No PCI-PCIe bridge for legacy PCI cards, no extra controllers for extra SATA or USB ports, only one LAN chip/port, etc. using almost exactly the same components and almost the same (if not exactly the same except for silkscreen) PCB layout and routing for all chipsets but there still is a ~$40 spread between basic b75 and basic z77.

So the price differentiation is almost entirely artificial.
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