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New Comp - Not working, Not sure why

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December 14, 2011 5:09:40 PM

So, my computer broke down in october and i ordered new parts while away. So today i finally had the chance to build it, so i installed the Motherboard, took my CPU off my old Mobo and installed that and the heatsink on the new one, put in the HDD and CD Drive, the Ram, PSU, and finally the graphics card. I booted it up, the fan on the graphics card is going, heatsink fan is going(so i assume that means the mobo works?), but no display on the monitor. Tried the connections and it still doesn't work, can anyone help me?

Also, do i need to plug the PSU into the CD drive/HDD? Its been awhile since i've built a comp and i forget ;\

More about : comp working

December 14, 2011 5:27:11 PM

Make sure your cpu is placed in there correctly. You'll notice the gold arrow on the bottom left typically, make sure it's aligned and snapped into place.

Also I assume that you have the correct socket mother board to match your cpu?

i.e. if you had a lga 1156, and bought a lga 1155 you're SOL.

Also make sure the 24 pin and potenial optional seeming 4 pins and plugged into the mother board.

edit: also check the input of the monitor you are using, I've run into it being set on analog, so it was unable to read the digital signal.
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December 14, 2011 5:28:46 PM

Does the motherboard have onboard video? If so, try plugging your monitor in there.
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December 14, 2011 6:04:34 PM

Hi,

can you please post your system details? Old and new, ok?

Thanks
Andy
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December 14, 2011 6:24:10 PM

System details -

SAPPHIRE 100315L Radeon HD 6850 1GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.1 x16 HDCP Ready CrossFireX Support Video Card with Eyefinity
AMD Phenom Quad Core x4 or x2, i forget/the box is gone
GIGABYTE GA-990XA-UD3 AM3+ AMD 990X SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX AMD Motherboard
Rosewill 850w PSU
PNY Optima 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1333 (PC3 10666) Desktop Memory Model MD8192KD3-1333
750GB WD Sata HDD

No onboard graphics with the Motherboard and the CPU arrow is placed correctly. Idk if this helps at all but it runs much quieter than my other computer did, but that could be because of how new the fans and equipment is.
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December 14, 2011 6:46:33 PM

If you're still wondering, you do need to plug the PSU into the CD and HDD drives. Also, if you haven't done this, i believe that 6850 needs a 6 pin pci power cable attached.
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December 14, 2011 7:00:04 PM

Probably even two of them... The PCIe power cables. Actually they could also be 8-pin. Don't know the card...
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December 14, 2011 7:03:32 PM

AM2A said:
If you're still wondering, you do need to plug the PSU into the CD and HDD drives. Also, if you haven't done this, i believe that 6850 needs a 6 pin pci power cable attached.


It's a 6-pin for the 6850, could not plugging the power into the HDD be causing this? But thanks for the CD/HDD answer, still no luck ;\
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December 14, 2011 7:22:25 PM

LiamLiam said:
It's a 6-pin for the 6850, could not plugging the power into the HDD be causing this? But thanks for the CD/HDD answer, still no luck ;\

I would still strongly suggest reseating the cpu (with care ) - and checking the input on the monitor through it's menu - try hooking up a ps3 or xbox360 to the monitor.

only things that could really cause this - bad cord - bad inputs - dead gpu - weak psu unable to power gpu (very very unlikely as per you using a 6850 on an 850watt psu) OR... poor cpu alignment :) 

not powering the HDD will still have your pc boot past bios then tell you there is no media attached or something similar, it would not halt on power on.

Is it the same gpu?? just new cpu/mobo? also look for additional power pins needed on your mobo. I once set mine up and saw a random 4 pin on my board, it wouldn't work until I plugged it in.
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a b ) Power supply
December 14, 2011 7:36:41 PM

LiamLiam said:
It's a 6-pin for the 6850, could not plugging the power into the HDD be causing this? But thanks for the CD/HDD answer, still no luck ;\


Plugging the power into the HDD is necessary for the HDD to work but isn't the cause of the problem.

Is the motherboard making any sounds? Any beeping at all when you turn it on? If not then turn it off (at the PSU and unplug from the wall). Then unplug the graphics card completely from the motherboard and PSU. Then turn the computer on again. You are listening for either a voice or a series of beeps (called a Power-On-Self-Test POST). This should be your motherboard telling you it has no video adapter just like it should since you clearly removed it. If you can't get it to beep or talk then something may be wrong with the motherboard or one of your other components. The board should at least POST without a video card installed.
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December 14, 2011 10:05:19 PM

jonnyrb said:
I would still strongly suggest reseating the cpu (with care ) - and checking the input on the monitor through it's menu - try hooking up a ps3 or xbox360 to the monitor.

only things that could really cause this - bad cord - bad inputs - dead gpu - weak psu unable to power gpu (very very unlikely as per you using a 6850 on an 850watt psu) OR... poor cpu alignment :) 

not powering the HDD will still have your pc boot past bios then tell you there is no media attached or something similar, it would not halt on power on.

Is it the same gpu?? just new cpu/mobo? also look for additional power pins needed on your mobo. I once set mine up and saw a random 4 pin on my board, it wouldn't work until I plugged it in.



Nah its an old CPU, new Mobo, GPU, RAM, and Case. Case works great, gpu seems to be working, ram i can't tell so it might be the CPU. Idk.

Also, the Heatsink fan is plugged into the Mobo, so wouldn't that mean the mobo's working?
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December 15, 2011 4:13:41 AM

Hi again.

The working fans are actually NO indication that a component is working fine (Graphics/MoBo). It would only tell you that the 12V rail is APPROXIMATELY doing what it's supposed to - generate voltage and deliver to the MoBo.

Please try the following:

Beore you touch the RAM - make sure you UNPLUG the power cord from the computer, then wait at least 30 seconds or press the power button to discharge capacitors.

Take one of the RAM strips out. Try in each slot. If no sucess, do the same with the other one(s), but only one by one.

Make sure the beeper is connected correctly so that you'll be able to hear any beep codes (POST).

If still no joy, reset the BIOS. Unplug power from PC, discharge, take RTC (CMOS / BIOS) battery out, set Jumper to clear cmos. Leave for ten minutes. Set jumper back to normal, insert battery, plug in the power, try to fire it up.

EDIT: Sorry, reviewed your initial posts again. I meant to say that you should try with only ONE RAM strip at the time.

Any luck?
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a c 144 ) Power supply
December 15, 2011 4:36:14 AM

First, review this to make sure you didn't overlook something simple:
Build it yourself:
http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/forum/274745-13-step-step...

Then work systematically through our standard checklist and troubleshooting thread:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261145-31-read-postin...
I mean work through, not just read over it. We spent a lot of time on this. It should find most of the problems.

If not, continue.
The following is an expansion of my troubleshooting tips in the breadboarding link in the "Cannot boot" thread.

I have tested the following beep patterns on Gigabyte, eVGA, and ECS motherboards. Other BIOS' may be different, but they all use a single short beep for a successful POST.

Breadboard - that will help isolate any kind of case problem you might have.
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/262730-31-breadboardi...

Breadboard with just motherboard, CPU & HSF, case speaker, and PSU.

Make sure you plug the CPU power cable in. The system will not boot without it.

I always breadboard a new build. It takes only a few minutes, and you know you are putting good parts in the case once you are finished.

You can turn on the PC by momentarily shorting the two pins that the case power switch goes to. You should hear a series of long, single beeps indicating memory problems. Silence indicates a problem with (in most likely order) the PSU, motherboard, or CPU. Remember, at this time, you do not have a graphics card installed so the load on your PSU will be reduced.

If no beeps:

Check for line power at the PSU input. Extension cords, power strips, and power cords do fail.

If you have power and no beeps, suspect components in likely order are PSU, motherboard, and CPU.

Running fans and drives and motherboard LED's do not necessarily indicate a good PSU. In the absence of a single short beep, they also do not indicate that the system is booting.

At this point, you can sort of check the PSU. Try to borrow a known good PSU of around 550 - 600 watts. That will power just about any system with a single GPU. If you cannot do that, use a DMM to measure the voltages. Measure between the colored wires and either chassis ground or the black wires. Yellow wires should be 12 volts. Red wires: +5 volts, orange wires: +3.3 volts, blue wire : -12 volts, violet wire: 5 volts always on. Tolerances are +/- 5% except for the -12 volts which is +/- 10%.

The gray wire is really important. It should go from 0 to +5 volts when you turn the PSU on with the case switch. CPU needs this signal to boot.

You can turn on the PSU by completely disconnecting the PSU and using a paperclip or jumper wire to short the green wire to one of the neighboring black wires.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5FWXgQSokF4&feature=yout...

A way that might be easier is to use the main power plug. Working from the back of the plug where the wires come out, use a bare paperclip to short between the green wire and one of the neighboring black wires. That will do the same thing with an installed PSU. It is also an easy way to bypass a questionable case power switch.

This checks the PSU under no load conditions, so it is not completely reliable. But if it can not pass this, it is dead. Then repeat the checks with the PSU plugged into the computer to put a load on the PSU.

If the system beeps:
If it looks like the PSU is good, install a memory stick. Boot. Beep pattern should change to one long and several short beeps indicating a missing graphics card.

Silence, long single beeps, or series of short beeps indicate a problem with the memory. If you get short beeps verify that the memory is in the appropriate motherboard slots.

Insert the video card and connect any necessary PCIe power connectors. Boot. At this point, the system should POST successfully (a single short beep). Notice that you do not need keyboard, mouse, monitor, or drives to successfully POST.
At this point, if the system doesn't work, it's either the video card or an inadequate PSU. Or rarely - the motherboard's PCIe interface.

Now start connecting the rest of the devices starting with the monitor, then keyboard and mouse, then the rest of the devices, testing after each step. It's possible that you can pass the POST with a defective video card. The POST routines can only check the video interface. It cannot check the internal parts of the video card.
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a c 243 ) Power supply
December 15, 2011 1:25:11 PM

jonnyrb said:
OR... poor cpu alignment :) 

I couldn't help myself, I LMFAO :lol: 
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