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Questions about Intel 2500K and Changing "Turbo State"

Hello,

I have a new HP S5-1110 PC and I was going to order an Intel 2500K from newegg.

HP lists this machine with options for an i5-2500S or i7-2600S CPU but I wanted to get the 3000 graphics chip so I figured I'd buy an upgraded CPU elsewhere. (It's a cheaper end cost to do it this way also)

I have 2 Questions:

1. Since HP does not have overclock options in the BIOS, will the CPU still Turbo boost up to 3.7 GHZ automatically?

2. I read that you can change the max 'turbo state" to 4.1 GHZ. How is this accomplished? Do I need special BIOS to set this value??


Thanks for the advice..
28 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about questions intel 2500k changing turbo state
  1. The problem is that the s cpu's are 65w, so if you put in anything more you will fry the motherboard....

    Also, S-1110 Is not a real model...
  2. Turbo mode will still work. Don't count on being able to upgrade the CPU.
  3. All i5 and i7 have turbo, it is not overclocking per se. You're most likely being limited to those cpus because of the psu, it has nothing to do with the motherboard.

    You will most likely not be able to change the max turbo speed as hp usually locks their bios like any other oem.
  4. Not true Pazero01. This same PC is available with an intel i5-2400 which is a 95W CPU.
  5. Sounds like "changing the max turbo state to 4.1 GHZ" is done via a BIOS option?
    Can anyone validate this is for sure?
  6. The real question is what is the chipset on the motherboard? If the motherboard that you have has H61, H67 or Q67 chipset dont even brother trying to buy an Intel Core i5-2500K or an Intel Core i7-2600K because you won't be able to overclock them. The P67 and the Z68 chipsets will allow you to overclock the processor but they are generally are not used on most OEM systems.

    Christian Wood
    Intel Enthusiast Team
  7. Tom92602 said:
    Sounds like "changing the max turbo state to 4.1 GHZ" is done via a BIOS option?
    Can anyone validate this is for sure?


    That's correct. Turbo state multiplier (or ratio) is adjusted in the BIOS and with an HP there's about a 99% chance that you'll have no options to change that setting. I know some of Dell's XPS and Alienware line of PC's have near non-OEM levels of BIOS adjustments but I don't think I've seen much in the way of an unhindered BIOS from the other large manufacturers (HP, Gateway, Acer, etc...).
  8. IntelEnthusiast said:
    The real question is what is the chipset on the motherboard? If the motherboard that you have has H61, H67 or Q67 chipset dont even brother trying to buy an Intel Core i5-2500K or an Intel Core i7-2600K because you won't be able to overclock them. The P67 and the Z68 chipsets will allow you to overclock the processor but they are generally are not used on most OEM systems.

    Christian Wood
    Intel Enthusiast Team


    He won't be able to overclock anyway. He's using a big box computer so the Bios will be locked.
    Tom with big box computers you are usually very limited on upgrades. The best thing to do is to go on HP's website and find your model. Then look up the CPU compatibilty list. Most likely the list is very short and very limited but for best compatibilty it is best to use what the big box companies recommend.
  9. Tom92602 said:
    Not true Pazero01. This same PC is available with an intel i5-2400 which is a 95W CPU.


    Well i could only assume as you didint post the proper pc model.

    You said they list the s models which are 65... so i guessed the motherboard has a max support for 65w.

    What is your pc model, check again
  10. Thanks 87ninefiveone..

    It seems like with a i5-2500K and a locked BIOS motherboard, I will be limited to 3.3 GHZ
    with all 4 cores running or the CPU will automatically (even on a locked BIOS motherboard)
    turbo up to 3.7 GHZ. I can live with this.

    I knew I couldn't overclock. I just wanted to make sure the turbo mode would still work on
    a locked BIOS motherboard and still get me up to at least 3.7 GHZ.

    It might seem like the 2500K is a waste of money in an HP, but I wanted the fastest non-OC'ed
    intel CPU with the 3000 Graphics Chipset and the 2500K seems like the best bet. The i7-2600k
    really would be a waste at $100 for only a 100MHZ boost over the i5-2500k.
  11. I've seen the HP S5 slimline that I have configured on HP's direct website for:

    i5-2400 (95W)
    i5-2500S (65W)
    i7-2600S (65W)

    So I know the i5-2500K will work based on socket type and CPU Wattage Requirements.
    I think the 2500K will work fine.. I just wanted to find out about the turbo mode on a locked BIOS.

    In my old Dell Slimline 540S, I put a 3.33 GHZ E8600 CPU in there (which was the top dog at the time)
    and it worked just fine running at 3.33 GHZ even though Dell never offered it as an option.
  12. Best answer
    "Processor upgrade information

    Socket type: LGA 1155

    Motherboard supports the following processor upgrades:Processor TDP
    Core i7-2600 (Sandy Bridge) quad core 95W
    Core i7-2600s (Sandy Bridge) quad core 65W
    Core i5-2500 (Sandy Bridge) quad core 95W
    Core i5-2500s (Sandy Bridge) quad core 65W
    Core i5-2500t (Sandy Bridge) quad core 45W
    Core i5-2400 (Sandy Bridge) quad core 95W
    Core i5-2400s (Sandy Bridge) quad core 65W
    Core i5-2390t (Sandy Bridge) quad core 35W
    Core i5-2300 (Sandy Bridge) quad core 95W
    Core i3-2120 (Sandy Bridge) dual core 65W
    Core i3-2100 (Sandy Bridge) dual core 65W
    Core i3-2100t (Sandy Bridge) dual core 35W"

    http://h20000.www2.hp.com/bizsupport/TechSupport/Document.jsp?lang=en&cc=us&taskId=120&prodSeriesId=5146457&prodTypeId=12454&objectID=c03009200&prodTypeId=12454&prodSeriesId=5146457

    My guess, it does support turbo.

    If the s and regular supports it then i dont see why the k one wouldn't, like you said

    http://www.colocomputer.com/copy-of-hp-slimline-s5-1070t-i5-2400s-2-generation-intel-quad-2-5ghz-6gb-ddr3-ram-1tb-wifi-n-hdmi-dvi-win-7-home-desktop-pc-factory-refurbished/

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/HP-Pavilion-Slimline-s5-1160-Desktop-PC-QP780AA-ABA-/320787530861


    Also you cant just say "In my old Dell Slimline 540S, I put a 3.33 GHZ E8600 CPU in there (which was the top dog at the time)
    and it worked just fine running at 3.33 GHZ even though Dell never offered it as an option." It doesn't work like that...
  13. It won't accept the 2500k like you wanted but thats not a huge loss because you wouldnt be able to overclock it anyway unless you changed out the mobo. It will accept other versions of the I5 though.
  14. why do you want the hd3000 graphics? if you are not gaming them teh 2000 will be fine, if you are gaming then the 3000 will be not good enough.
  15. Be careful about making assumptions on which processors "should" fit. The OE's usually lock down their motherboards to accept ONLY the processors originally offered by them. It may or may not work at this time, and they may or may not release a BIOS update in the future that enables compatability if they decide to offer the 2500/2500K later.
  16. they'll probably save the 2500's for a more premium machine, and if they also offer the 2500 in the lower machine then there's no dofferentiation. so I reckon you will not see it in the same machine as the lower end chips.
  17. Pazero01:

    Excellent post on all the supported CPU's! I was merely going by what I saw for sale on
    HP's direct website.

    Look's like it lists all i3, i5, i7 CPU's at 95W or less except the "K" series which were probably
    not in existence when HP wrote this specifications document. If the HP S5-1110 works with
    the regular 95W i5-2500 w/2000 graphics die, is there any reason that a i5-2500k with the
    3000 graphics would not work?

    I am guessing the i5-2500k would just fine..
  18. why do you want the 3000? what are you going to use it for?
  19. For the extra $10, the Intel 3000 graphics Die has been reviewed as twice as fast as the 2000 Graphics Die.
    For $10, I would like the snappier graphics..
  20. RDS1220: Why would my S5-1110 not accept an i5-2500K ?
  21. for what purpose, for gaming, in which case its still pretty poor, or for desktop use in which case it doesn't matter.

    The bios may be locked to not accept a 2500K
    you seem to want the answer to be yes and ignore most posts that state it may not work, in which case i have to ask, why have you asked the question?
  22. Tom92602 said:
    RDS1220: Why would my S5-1110 not accept an i5-2500K ?


    Because with big box computers 99% of the time the Bios is locked. A locked Bios means you can't change the CPU speed, RAM speed or anything else. Because of that the 2500K (a chip with unlocked cores for overclocking) is useless in that computer and it won't be supported by the motherboard.
  23. 13thmonkey said:
    for what purpose, for gaming, in which case its still pretty poor, or for desktop use in which case it doesn't matter.

    The bios may be locked to not accept a 2500K
    you seem to want the answer to be yes and ignore most posts that state it may not work, in which case i have to ask, why have you asked the question?


    So in other words you were just guessing with no idea at all whether it would work or not..

    I was mildly curious if you knew something (like maybe you had tried it in this model PC) but
    obviously you don't have any idea and simply wanted to be a jerk about it. Ok, that is your
    choice. With the long list of compatible i5's and i7's I bet it will work and am willing to take
    the minuscule risk that it may not.

    And if you read my original post, it was just to ask about how the turbo mode worked.
    I only got side-tracked on these compatibility questions when people started to announce
    (without knowing anything about the PC) that if would only accept a 65W CPU and that a 95W
    CPU would "fry the motherboard" which I replied to as false claims.
  24. OK, you seem to know enough to answer questions for yourself, i've not known many big box makers unlock bioses so that you can change the processor, away from what is intended.

    I'm trying to help by asking what you want 'snappier' graphics for, but you've yet to answer that question. But then that doesn't help you get to the version of the truth that you want.
  25. There seems to be a lot of that going around the last couple days.
  26. something for nothing, wanting approval, and perhaps someone to rant at when it doesn't work, why he doesn't just build it himself I don't know.
  27. 13thmonkey said:
    something for nothing, wanting approval, and perhaps someone to rant at when it doesn't work, why he doesn't just build it himself I don't know.


    No I didn't want something for nothing I was inquiring about how turbo mode worked and if it
    required an unlocked bios. It is clear to me that 13thmonkey and Rds1220 were just being complete
    and arrogant jerks when replying to my simple questions as to how they know this CPU would not work
    in my PC.

    They obviously have no experience with locked bios motherboards and it shows. Every locked bios
    motherboard I have encountered worked with any upgraded CPU that was of the intended wattage
    and socket type. These 2 clowns speak as if they know something and then got all jerky when questioned
    if they know what they state from experience. I personally have upgraded many Dells and HPs with
    higher model CPUs that were of the same socket type and maximum wattage limit and they have
    always worked. Always! The Motherboard always sped up to the higher clock speed of the upgraded
    CPU. I simply asked how these clowns knew it would not work since they commented with such arrogance.

    Before you two jokers reply with comments about overclocking, this is not at all what I am talking about.
    It is clear that a locked BIOS can not overclock a CPU which is not my intention. Only to in inquire about
    turbo mode which I did. Maybe you two (13thmonkey and Rds1220) should not speak about things you
    do not know about. I guess it was my mistake for asking you to substantiate your claims.
  28. Best answer selected by Tom92602.
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