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GTX 560 TI with 475 W power supply

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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July 17, 2011 4:09:21 PM

Hello everyone,

I would like to upgrade my Dell XPS 435T's graphics card. I currently run a GTX 260 with no issues. I would like to get a superclocked GTX 560TI seen here:
http://www.evga.com/products/moreInfo.asp?pn=01G-P3-156...

I've found that the power supply included in the XPS 435T is rated at 475 Watts. Do you think this is enough?

According to the answer found here:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/276272-33-5870-power-...

The 12v rail is rated to 32 amps, correct? If you compare that to the cards specs it looks like I might be OK. The card recommends a 500 Watt PSU with a 30 amp 12v rail, but mine is a 32 amp 12v rail at 475 watts.

Thanks in advance! ♥ Toms Hardware!
July 17, 2011 9:26:48 PM

I forgot to mention my setup:

1920x1200 LCD Display
Intel core i7-920
6x2gb (12 gb total) tri-channel ddr3 RAM
640gb seagate 7200 rpm hdd
2 optical drives, one dvdrw and one blu-ray rom
475 watt unkown PSU with a 32amp 12v

Let me know if anyone needs anything else.
Thanks again!
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a c 549 U Graphics card
a c 1180 ) Power supply
July 17, 2011 10:41:11 PM

The 475 Watt PSU in your Dell XPS 435T is made by Flextronics.

Flextronics is the same company that makes Corsair's Professional Series Gold AX1200 (CMPSU-1200AX) power supply unit that earns JonnyGURU's perfect 10 for power supply performance.

A reference clocked GeForce GTX 260 actually consumes more power than a reference clocked GeForce GTX 560 Ti. Since your current power supply is able to run your system with a GeForce GTX 260 it should still be able to run your system with a GeForce GTX 560 Ti.

The EVGA GeForce GTX 560 Ti Superclocked will draw up to 2 Amps more from the +12 Volt rail under typical gaming load as compared to its reference clocked version. Although if you were to run FurMark it would draw up to 3.2 Amps more than the reference clocked version.
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July 17, 2011 10:46:36 PM

I'm sorry, you lost me with the FurMark part. I have FurMark downloaded and I've run a stress test with it before. Were you implying that just running the FurMark benchmark my video card would draw 3.2 amps more than usual? If so, I have already exceeded the power capacity needed for the Superclocked GTX 560 Ti, correct?

Thanks again!
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a c 549 U Graphics card
a c 1180 ) Power supply
July 17, 2011 11:15:40 PM

MisterFister said:
I'm sorry, you lost me with the FurMark part. I have FurMark downloaded and I've run a stress test with it before. Were you implying that just running the FurMark benchmark my video card would draw 3.2 amps more than usual? If so, I have already exceeded the power capacity needed for the Superclocked GTX 560 Ti, correct?

Thanks again!

A GTX 560 Ti running at 900 MHz core clock will consume 240 Watts (20 Amps from +12V rail) when running FurMark.

A GTX 560 Ti running at 822 MHz reference core clock will consume 202 Watts (16.8 Amps from +12V rail) when running FurMark.

Running FurMark is not considered typical/real-world use.

I think the original 475 Watt PSU is still enough to meet the minimum requirements for running the EVGA GeForce GTX 560 Ti Superclocked.
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July 18, 2011 2:00:50 AM

Best answer selected by MisterFister.
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July 18, 2011 2:02:21 AM

Thanks Ko,

I was wondering how you got the numbers you used though. I understand that Watts == Volts * amps, but how did you get the amps/watts numbers? Is it based off the core speed?

Thanks again.
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a c 549 U Graphics card
a c 1180 ) Power supply
July 18, 2011 4:11:23 AM

MisterFister said:
Thanks Ko,

I was wondering how you got the numbers you used though. I understand that Watts == Volts * amps, but how did you get the amps/watts numbers? Is it based off the core speed?

Thanks again.

I looked up the power consumption from TechPowerUp.com's reviews of those graphics cards running with the core clock speeds mentioned. TechPowerUp.com usually reports the Idle, Average, Peak (reached when Gaming) and Maximum (when running FurMark) power consumption in their reviews.

The power draw is reported in Watts so the current draw is calculated using Ohm's Law by dividing Power in Watts by 12 Volts giving the current draw in Amps. The voltage is always 12 Volts in this case because the graphics card gets all of its power from the +12 Volt rail(s).
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a c 271 U Graphics card
a b ) Power supply
July 18, 2011 9:55:24 AM

This topic has been closed by Mousemonkey
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