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Memory Voltage

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October 1, 2012 12:37:21 AM

This is a two part question.

I recently had to do a rebuild with my system and being the cautious / paranoid person that i am about overclocking i was leery of using Intel's X.M.P. with my X.M.P. 1.5 rated memory modules. I have checked my voltage with X.M.P. and without X.M.P. and both statements read between 1.50x and 1.51x where x constitutes a real number between 0 and 9. I know that is a minor fluctuation but it still is above the stated 1.5 could that pose a danger to my system?

Secondly i purchased memory modules rated at DDR3 1600 1.5v rated at 11-11-11-30 timings. I know the "premium" memory at that speed rates at 9-9-9-24. Now just looking at the Cas latency my memory rates at 13.75 nanoseconds = the CAS11 latency
while CAS9 would run a t 11.25 nanoseconds now does that 2.5 nanoseconds difference make that much of a difference in system performance?

I have a 3.4ghz cpu that can turbo boost to 3.9ghz , Discreet Graphics and Sound cards and my DDR3 memory, my Linux system drive runs at sata 3 speed and my 7 other drives run at sata 2. If i compared actual performance to actual performance between the CAS11 and CAS9 DDR3 1600 1.5v memory would run significantly lower than the other. My rig is built for gaming , programming, some graphic design, running a test apache server with no more than 2 connections assuming one is loopback , office functions, DVD watching, internet / email viewing, and bluray / 3D bluray / TV watching assuming i can find some linux or XP64bit programs that can support that

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a b } Memory
October 1, 2012 3:02:49 AM

Do you know what a nano-second is? Your taling about noticeing things that happen faster that the blink of an eye and your worried about nano seconds.
You can use the XMP profile and there is no danger , everyone uses it.
Memory plays such a small part in the overall picture that you will not notice the difference between 1333mhz and 1600mhz and 1866mhz. You will also not notice the difference between cas 8 , cas 9, cas 10 or cas11. You will have to use software to record the differences and we are talking about a few nano seconds here and there difference.
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a b } Memory
October 1, 2012 3:09:41 AM

inzone is right.
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a b } Memory
October 1, 2012 3:30:45 AM

inzone said:
Do you know what a nano-second is? Your taling about noticeing things that happen faster that the blink of an eye and your worried about nano seconds.
You can use the XMP profile and there is no danger , everyone uses it.
Memory plays such a small part in the overall picture that you will not notice the difference between 1333mhz and 1600mhz and 1866mhz. You will also not notice the difference between cas 8 , cas 9, cas 10 or cas11. You will have to use software to record the differences and we are talking about a few nano seconds here and there difference.
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October 1, 2012 3:41:52 AM

So there is no possible way for the difference to compound after millions of read/writes to the memory from the CPU?
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a b } Memory
October 1, 2012 3:43:01 AM

Alpha90 said:
So there is no possible way for the difference to compound after millions of read/writes to the memory from the CPU?


Into something perceptible? Maybe.
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a b } Memory
October 1, 2012 4:35:30 AM

The rumor that anything above 1.5 voilts will damage your SB / IB CPU is a persistent but very FALSE one.

1.5 volts is for the JDEC profiles .... most XMP profiles for i5 and i7 RAM use 1.65. In fact, over 2/3 of the RAM on Intel's XMP compatible list for i5 and i7 are over 1.50 volts.

http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/gaming/gaming-co...

Quote:
Intel® Extreme Memory Profile (Intel® XMP) allows you to overclock compatible DDR3 memory to perform beyond standard specifications. It’s designed to enhance the gaming features built into Intel® technology–based PCs. If you like to overclock and squeeze as much performance from your PC as possible, then memory based on Intel XMP gives you that extra edge you need to dominate—without breaking a sweat.

Predefined and tested Intel XMP profiles can be loaded via BIOS or a specific tuning application through a computer’s operating system. Often the easiest way to load Intel XMP profiles is using a tuning utility, which may be available depending on the particular board manufacturer. To learn whether a tuning utility is available on your system, you should contact the board manufacturer.


Most listed compatible i5 / i7 RAM is 1.65 .... at least according to Intel's compatibility lists:

http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/gaming/gaming-co...
http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/gaming/gaming-co...

Intel's approved i7 Compatibilty List (April 2012) includes:

34 1.65 volt modules
07 1.60 volt modules
19 1.50 volt modules
01 1.25 volt modules

So 41 outta 61 modules on Intel's own compatiubility lists are above 1.5 volts .... so for every 1.5 volt modules on the approved list, there are 2 modules above 1.5 volts that are also on the approved lists.

The short answer ..... don't worry about it.

As for speed differences.....yes, there are differences between speed of different modules as well as CAS ....can you notice the differences .... I dunno, will ya notice $10 extra on a $2000 build ? Sometimes it does, sometimes it doesn't

http://www.anandtech.com/show/2792/12

22.3 % (SLI) increase in minimum frame rates w/ C6 instead of C8 in Far Cry 2
18% (single card) / 5% (SLI) increase in minimum frame rates w/ C6 instead of C8 in Dawn of War
15% (single card) / 5% (SLI) increase in minimum frame rates w/ C6 instead of C8 in World in Conflict

Also see http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/memory/2011/01/11/the-...

On SB, using Crysis, we see a 0.9% increase in speed with DDR3-2133vs DDR-1866
On SB, using Civilization 5, we see a 4.5% increase in Min. Frame Rates with DDR3-2133 vs DDR-1866

So what does it cost ya ? For argument's sake , let's first look at 2133 vs 1866. (Corsair Vengeance 2 x 4GB modules)

DDR3-2133 - $56
DDR3-1866 - $53
DDR3-1600 - $42

Looking at DDR3-1600 from Muskin

CAS7 - $64
CAS8 - $52
CAS9 - $42

So here's several arguments that could be made.

1. Is DDR3-2133 worth the 4.5 % increase in Min FPS in Civ 5 for a 5.3% increase in price ?
2. Is DDR3-2133 worth the 4.5 % increase in Min FPS in Civ 5 for a 0.015 % increase in system cost ?
3. Is 1 fps even worth talking about ?
4. Is $3 even worth talking about ?

Simple answer .... it's a personal decision. Arguing about whether or not something is worth it is kinda silly when the difference in cost is $10 - $20 .... with system costs from $1200 - $2000 being the target audience, we talking "coffee money" here. Even in a $1200 system we are talking about a 1 - 1.5 % increase in system cost. If ya can pick up a small increase for that marginal increase in cost, I certainly can't argue against it.
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October 3, 2012 8:39:49 PM

Best answer selected by Alpha90.
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