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What voltage PSU needed?

Last response: in Systems
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September 19, 2011 11:30:14 PM

Hi everyone, so here's my setup so far:

CD Drive:
ASUS DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS Black SATA 24X DVD Burner - Bulk - OEM
Case:
COOLER MASTER RC-692-KKN2 CM690 II Advanced Black Steel ATX Mid Tower Computer Case
Harddrive:
Seagate Barracuda ST31000524AS 1TB 7200 RPM SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive
Monitor:
ASUS VS248H-P Black 24" HDMI LED Backlight Widescreen LCD Monitor
RAM:
Patriot Gamer 2 Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1333 (PC3 10666) Desktop Memory Model PGD38G1333ELK
Motherboard:
GIGABYTE GA-Z68X-UD3H-B3 LGA 1155 Intel Z68 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard
CPU:
Intel Core i5-2500K Sandy Bridge 3.3GHz (3.7GHz Turbo Boost) LGA 1155 95W Quad-Core Desktop Processor
GPU:
EVGA GeForce GTX 570 Superclocked 1280 MB GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 2DVI/Mini-HDMI SLI Ready Limited Lifetime Warranty Graphics Card, 012-P3-1572-AR

I'm not sure what kind of PSU to get, as I'm not sure how much voltage everything here would take up. Could you all recommend one for me? I'm not looking to overclock right now, but it always remains an option I guess for later on. Thanks!

P.S. The case I have comes preinstalled with 2 140 mm (1 LED and one not) fans and 1 120 mm fan (take that into account for voltage I guess).

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September 19, 2011 11:39:11 PM

whoa, 620W vs 750W? That's a pretty large discrepancy. Which do I actually need?
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September 19, 2011 11:39:55 PM

well, the voltage isn't going to change no matter what components you throw in your PC. What you really want to know is how many Watts your PC will consume. As a quick note, Watts = Volts * Amps.

Anyways, a 550-600W should be sufficient to overclock and add 1-2HDD later down the road, but it won't be enough to crossfire/sli. Going bigger doesn't hurt, but is generally more expensive. You can get Antec, Corsair, or Seasonic for a good brand. My current pick is the Antec Earthwatts 650 due to the $50 price point after rebate - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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September 19, 2011 11:40:51 PM

A good quality 650 watts psu should be enough. Try looking for Corsair, Antec, Seasonic, PC Power and Cooling, XFX brands.
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September 19, 2011 11:43:40 PM

Odoaker said:
whoa, 620W vs 750W? That's a pretty large discrepancy. Which do I actually need?


Your system will probably draw ~475W at peak load overclocked. I'm not a fan of running at 100% load myself. Either PSU would work though. Some people like to buy huge PSUs to "future proof" the system. However, buying huge PSUs is a waste of money if you will never use the capacity.
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September 19, 2011 11:47:02 PM

How about this one? Someone on another thread here had referred me to this one (in a question unrelated to PSU of all things, I was just asking how my build looked).

XFX Core Edition PRO650W (P1-650S-NLB9) 650W ATX12V 2.2 & ESP12V 2.91 SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Active PFC Power Supply
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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September 19, 2011 11:50:33 PM

That XFX will work as well.

The reason I chose that Antec was because it was one of the cheaper PSUs that are reliable and able to power your system easily
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September 19, 2011 11:52:29 PM

That very first Antec is just fine and a good PSU. I saw good prices at NCIX.

To be clear, there are FOUR things to consider when buying a PSU:

1. Overall Wattage (online calculator)

2. Amperage for the graphics card (recommend at least 1.25x the rating of the graphics card. Usually described as for the +12V rail. e.g. for GTX570 it is 38Amps I think so I'd recommend a 48A or higher PSU to be safe. usually this Amp rating is on the side of the PSU.)

3. Quality (never get a cheap PSU. If it's $25 and 600Watts beware! Look for reviews for your PSU, but keep in mind an "average" rating compared to other high-end PSU's is still a very good PSU especially if the price is very good.)

4. Price. (Why spend $200 if an $80 PSU fits your needs and is good quality?)
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September 20, 2011 1:24:52 AM

photonboy said:
That very first Antec is just fine and a good PSU. I saw good prices at NCIX.

To be clear, there are FOUR things to consider when buying a PSU:

1. Overall Wattage (online calculator)

2. Amperage for the graphics card (recommend at least 1.25x the rating of the graphics card. Usually described as for the +12V rail. e.g. for GTX570 it is 38Amps I think so I'd recommend a 48A or higher PSU to be safe. usually this Amp rating is on the side of the PSU.)

3. Quality (never get a cheap PSU. If it's $25 and 600Watts beware! Look for reviews for your PSU, but keep in mind an "average" rating compared to other high-end PSU's is still a very good PSU especially if the price is very good.)

4. Price. (Why spend $200 if an $80 PSU fits your needs and is good quality?)


This is all good advice. Although some power supplies split the 12V rail and you could add the amps on each rail.
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September 20, 2011 3:13:30 AM

Corsair CX500 V2. Enough for a single GTX 570.
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!