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Want to use a wireless router(maybe)

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November 2, 2010 3:10:33 PM

I just purchased a Logitech Revue and I am having the an issue hooking it up.I have a computer set up downstairs with a modem& router set up.If I set up a wire-less router closer to my bedroom(where the Logitech Revue is)will it have any effect on my connection to the other computer?I plan on having a home theater PC(almost built,need a hard drive and Blu Ray Drive)and the Logitech upstairs in the bedroom.I read a lot of complaints about the Revue bot it is new technology so I figured I would ask you guys on this site.I respect your opinions way more and you guys have helped my a ton in the last 2 years..........& What exactly do I need to run wireless internet.How many components?

More about : wireless router

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November 3, 2010 3:43:46 AM

Your logitech Revue supports Networking: Wireless: 802.11a/b/g/n.
So any wireless router purchased inline with those standards should work with it.

You need (A) iSP Modem==> (B) wireless router connected to the WAN port, all cabled and wireless clients connect to the router. Sometimes (A) and (B) are are one piece of hardware.

N.b. item (B) Can also just be a plain router in which case you would need to get a wireless access point
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wireless_access_point
http://www.amazon.com/Cisco-Linksys-WAP54G-Wireless-G-A...
remember an access point is just that, if not hooked up to something (router) to connect to the internet you wont get far

Log into the router from the "wired" PC you have it connected to and check to see if the wireless is turned on, this varies from one Manufacturer to another but is usually something like 192.168.2.1/192.168.1.1. Check to see if any encryption is turned on and for testing turn it off till you get them working well, you may find that some do not like a particular encryption.

Normally you should be able to have quite a few wireless clients hooked up to the router without slow down ( I have previously connected, Wii,mobile phone,laptop,PS3 and two other computers at the same time wirelessly all updating their software without really slowing the router down, the internet itself is another matter), though latencies will increase the further away you are from the router. Just do it one by one.
A few things I found useful,
1. Pick the worst reception/furthest piece of hardware you have first and set that up. I found that to get everyone happy I had to choose a channel that didnt interfere with any other wireless device in the house Channel 3. .e.g. Cordless phone, wireless mouse,etc, it was tedious to say the least.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEEE_802.11g-2003 as refference for channel frequencies

2. keep them all on one standard. I just use G as a few other devices I have are capable of B but for some reason my Belkin router doesnt like mixed modes. Some routers will be fine with this, you may get an overal drop in performance when mixed depending on which you are mixing.

For a home network an basic wireless router will allow more clients than you are likely to use, you normally have 4 rj45 ports on the router which you could connect each to a switch and have easily over 100 connections. How many wireless clients you can connect at a time to a router varies from one to another but around 50 should be easy work for it.

I find walking arround with a laptop that has a wireless card very useful to map out the range of transmition around the house, as performance can disappear in spots. E.g. I di
If this happens and you are not getting the range you want you should consider investing in either a wireless repeater
http://www.amazon.com/Cisco-Linksys-Wireless-G-Range-Ex...
and placing it at the edge before the signal drops to crap to extend or a home plug kit, ( the latter comes with its own risks though..

http://forums.hexus.net/networking-broadband/150623-hom...
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November 4, 2010 8:19:47 PM

Best answer selected by seanny.
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November 4, 2010 8:22:17 PM

curtis_87 said:
Your logitech Revue supports Networking: Wireless: 802.11a/b/g/n.
So any wireless router purchased inline with those standards should work with it.

You need (A) iSP Modem==> (B) wireless router connected to the WAN port, all cabled and wireless clients connect to the router. Sometimes (A) and (B) are are one piece of hardware.

N.b. item (B) Can also just be a plain router in which case you would need to get a wireless access point
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wireless_access_point
http://www.amazon.com/Cisco-Linksys-WAP54G-Wireless-G-A...
remember an access point is just that, if not hooked up to something (router) to connect to the internet you wont get far

Log into the router from the "wired" PC you have it connected to and check to see if the wireless is turned on, this varies from one Manufacturer to another but is usually something like 192.168.2.1/192.168.1.1. Check to see if any encryption is turned on and for testing turn it off till you get them working well, you may find that some do not like a particular encryption.

Normally you should be able to have quite a few wireless clients hooked up to the router without slow down ( I have previously connected, Wii,mobile phone,laptop,PS3 and two other computers at the same time wirelessly all updating their software without really slowing the router down, the internet itself is another matter), though latencies will increase the further away you are from the router. Just do it one by one.
A few things I found useful,
1. Pick the worst reception/furthest piece of hardware you have first and set that up. I found that to get everyone happy I had to choose a channel that didnt interfere with any other wireless device in the house Channel 3. .e.g. Cordless phone, wireless mouse,etc, it was tedious to say the least.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEEE_802.11g-2003 as refference for channel frequencies

2. keep them all on one standard. I just use G as a few other devices I have are capable of B but for some reason my Belkin router doesnt like mixed modes. Some routers will be fine with this, you may get an overal drop in performance when mixed depending on which you are mixing.

For a home network an basic wireless router will allow more clients than you are likely to use, you normally have 4 rj45 ports on the router which you could connect each to a switch and have easily over 100 connections. How many wireless clients you can connect at a time to a router varies from one to another but around 50 should be easy work for it.

I find walking arround with a laptop that has a wireless card very useful to map out the range of transmition around the house, as performance can disappear in spots. E.g. I di
If this happens and you are not getting the range you want you should consider investing in either a wireless repeater
http://www.amazon.com/Cisco-Linksys-Wireless-G-Range-Ex...
and placing it at the edge before the signal drops to crap to extend or a home plug kit, ( the latter comes with its own risks though..

http://forums.hexus.net/networking-broadband/150623-hom...

Thank you! Very much!!That was the best advice and info I have had all year.This Logitech Revue is an absolute headache.I will keep you updated on my progress or non-progress.
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