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After a few problem-free weeks, Computer has issues

Last response: in Systems
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September 23, 2011 3:58:01 PM

I have searched endlessly through Google and this site's forum search, but I couldn't find a solution to my problem.

I finally built my first computer over Labor Day weekend. I had no issues until yesterday. I was watching a movie, got up to go to the kitchen, and when I came back, my computer was off. It would not turn back on. After opening it up and replugging everything in, it still did not come back on right away. As I was browsing the internet for a solution (3 hours later), my computer suddenly turned on. Everything seemed to be working fine at that point.

I checked the temp of my CPU--hovering around 35-40 in the BIOS and the cores were 25-34. To test the load, I loaded Final Fantasy XIV. I was able to play for about an hour or so before my computer suddenly turned off again. It was as if the cord had been pulled. It restarted briefly and I could look at the BIOS again--still no CPU problems. However, before Windows loaded, it turned off again. It has not been able to come back on (6 hours later and after much needed sleep).

Unfortunately, my room is old (the joys of living in the Boston area) and has only one outlet, so a LOT of stuff is running into the outlet. The power from my PC goes into a power surge protector which is plugged into a Cyberpower battery backup system which then plugs into the wall outlet.. On the initial power surge protector is my tv, box fan, TV Digital antennae, and sound bar. On the Cypberpower battery, besides the surge protector, is my iphone cord, printer (when needed), a lamp (never on). On the outlet, besides the Cyberpower battery, is a regular extension cord which leads to another box fan and the AC power for my Network Adapter. I have tried unplugging everything from the initial surge protector, but still can't get power. Besides, this setup was working fine until yesterday.

My Build is as follows:
CPU: i5 2500k - not OC'ed when problem arose
CPU Heatsink: Corsair H50
GPU: EVGA GeForce GTX 570 HD 2560 MB
RAM: G.SKill Ripjaws (2x4GB) DDR3 SDRAM 1600
MOBO: ASRock P867 Extreme4 (B3)
PSU: Corsair AX750 (CMPSU-750AX) 750W
BD Drive: Samsung Black 12X BD-ROM 16X DVD-ROM 48X CD-ROM SATA
HDD: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 7200 RPM 64MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s
Case: AZZA Solano 1000 Black/Black Japanese SECC Steel/Metal mesh in front ATX Full Tower Computer Case

Other stuff:
NIC: Intel PWLA8391GT 10/ 100/ 1000Mbps PCI Desktop Adapter PRO/1000 GT
Wireless Adapt Trendnet TEW-687GA Ethernet Port Wireless N Gaming Adapter
Inputs: Logitech Wireless mouse and keyboard
PS3 Game controller

Any input is welcomed. I am going to try this: http://www.corsair.com/blog/Testing-your-corsair-power-... sometime this weekend (when I have time). But if my described symptoms above suggest something else, I'd love to hear it.

Thank you again for your help!
September 23, 2011 4:12:04 PM

Looks to be defective PSU. I have a corsair 650, it did same thing you describe. Random power cycle.
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September 23, 2011 4:14:53 PM

Ugh Wall of text.

Sounds like a power issue. Or possibly your heat sink is not on your CPU properly.

"The power from my PC goes into a power surge protector which is plugged into a CyberPower battery backup system which then plugs into the wall outlet.."

When you are using a UPS' you do not need to use a Surge protector. Plug your PC directly into your UPS. UPS's usually already have built in surge protection.

For some reason I don't like the way you have everything plugged into only 1 wall outlet.

Can you run PRIME 95 First,

Then Memtest 86. Both are free and can be googled.
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September 23, 2011 4:16:30 PM

Also you will need a line conditioner. There is a lot of device plug into the outlet. The battery is not going to help when the voltage drops to unusable levels(brown out). The line conditioner automatically step up the coming voltage if there is a drop in line voltage.

The prolong occurrence of brown out will shorten the life on the devices. That may have lead to the failure of your PSU.
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September 23, 2011 4:20:08 PM

Chainzsaw said:
Ugh Wall of text.

Sounds like a power issue. Or possibly your heat sink is not on your CPU properly.

"The power from my PC goes into a power surge protector which is plugged into a CyberPower battery backup system which then plugs into the wall outlet.."

When you are using a UPS' you do not need to use a Surge protector. Plug your PC directly into your UPS. UPS's usually already have built in surge protection.

For some reason I don't like the way you have everything plugged into only 1 wall outlet.

Can you run PRIME 95 First,

Then Memtest 86. Both are free and can be googled.


My apologies for the wall of text, but I figured it was better to describe the situation in-depth rather than piecemeal through responses.
Anyway, I would prefer to plug my PC directly into the UPS.. but cord length is the limiting factor. I simply can't plug my UPS into the wall outlet and have the PSU power cord reach it... the room setup is awful, but the house is pretty old.. so I am not left with many choices other than moving.
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September 23, 2011 4:26:50 PM

jivdis1x said:
Also you will need a line conditioner. There is a lot of device plug into the outlet. The battery is not going to help when the voltage drops to unusable levels(brown out). The line conditioner automatically step up the coming voltage if there is a drop in line voltage.

The prolong occurrence of brown out will shorten the life on the devices. That may have lead to the failure of your PSU.


Would I plug the conditioner into the wall outlet, then the batter to the conditioner?
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September 23, 2011 4:27:10 PM

the ups makes a power conditioner unneeded. you draw directly from the battery. well after its converted to a very stable AC of course.
Chainzsaw is spot on. simplify your power input, hopefully that helps. though you will most likely need a new power supply, hopefully it pops on without the surge protector, first try direct into the wall. simple is best.
then stress test it with prime 95 and check memory with memtest.
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September 23, 2011 4:49:16 PM

alright, bought some extension power cords. I'll give that a shot when they arrive. I'm also going to RMA the PSU and see if that helps as well.
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September 23, 2011 5:37:05 PM

yongsoo said:
Would I plug the conditioner into the wall outlet, then the batter to the conditioner?


The line conditioner is first thing plug into the wall. Everything plug after the line conditioner.

Typical UPS DOES NOT step up line voltage. Commercial class UPS may have a step up transformer. The residential model will not. It only provide power during total lost of line voltage. UPS does have a surge protection but NOT brown out protection. Brown out occur more often than surge. Utility Co has a step down transformer supplying the building with 110volt for single phrase.

Ex. When you have the light on and the central AC kick on and the light dim=Brown out
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September 23, 2011 5:51:30 PM

farrengottu said:
the ups makes a power conditioner unneeded. you draw directly from the battery. well after its converted to a very stable AC of course.
Chainzsaw is spot on. simplify your power input, hopefully that helps. though you will most likely need a new power supply, hopefully it pops on without the surge protector, first try direct into the wall. simple is best.
then stress test it with prime 95 and check memory with memtest.


That is not how UPS works. When there is no power lost. The UPS operates in pass-thru. The device plugs in an UPS, it's drawing power independent of the battery circuitry. It only use the surge circuit. When the UPS sense a power lost, it trip the circuit and the battery kick in: this happen in millisecond.

A good UPS will have shorter trip time.

Device draws power from the battery only during power failure, the circuit will convert the DC in AC; that is true. Any other time, UPS operates in pass-thru.
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September 23, 2011 6:58:05 PM

hmmm well, my battery does have AVR.. shouldn't that be doing the job of the line conditioner?

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September 24, 2011 6:06:00 AM

yongsoo said:
hmmm well, my battery does have AVR.. shouldn't that be doing the job of the line conditioner?



Automatic Voltage regulator =yes it's a in line voltage conditioner. It's good that you own such a UPS. Only the AVG series of cyberpower has that feature. Good Job in choosing the right one.
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