Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

CPU and Graphics Card Overheating?

Last response: in CPUs
Share
December 27, 2011 10:31:45 PM

Hello,

My parents' computer is fairly old (8 years I believe), and lately it has been having problems with the system freezing up and the computer restarting itself. I clean the case out regularly with canned air, but the problems persist.

Specs:

CPU: AMD XP 2400+
Motherboard: MSI KT4AV-L
Graphics Card: EVGA Nvidia 6800GT
Memory: 1 GB DDR Memory.
OS: Windows XP 32-bit SP3
PSU: Antec 430W.

Nothing is overclocked or anything.

Here is a screenshot of SpeedFan when I ran it on their computer: http://i.imgur.com/2lIyu.png. It seems that the GPU and CPU are both overheating, unless I am mistaken. This is idle, right after the computer booted up.

Are these temps too high? What is the problem here? What should I do to resolve any problems? I will be glad to provide any more information if it is needed.

I am hoping there is a relatively inexpensive solution to this/these problem(s). I've been trying to convince them that they could use a new system altogether, but I think it would be nice to expand this old computer's lifespan as long as I can.

Thanks.
a b U Graphics card
December 27, 2011 10:37:43 PM

The CPU temp looks fine, but the GPU and Core temps at 94C are dangerously high.

Is this under load (such as when playing a game), or are you idling?

With a computer like that, an upgrade is definitely in order, temps aside. The exception is if you don't play games, do video processing, or other CPU-demanding tasks. Office work and web browsing are still fine on such a system.

Edit: Added more details.
m
0
l
December 27, 2011 10:46:46 PM

ulillillia said:
The CPU temp looks fine, but the GPU and Core temps at 94C are dangerously high.

Is this under load (such as when playing a game), or are you idling?

With a computer like that, an upgrade is definitely in order, temps aside. The exception is if you don't play games, do video processing, or other CPU-demanding tasks. Office work and web browsing are still fine on such a system.

Edit: Added more details.

Oh, I thought "Core" was the CPU. I'm not very experienced with using SpeedFan.

These are idle temps. I took them right after cleaning out the case with compressed air and booting it up.

My parents aren't exactly hardcore gamers, but my old man enjoys casual games from time to time, such as Bejeweled. But whenever he tries to play such games, it causes the computer to either freeze or restart itself, likely due to the high temps.
m
0
l
Related resources
a b U Graphics card
December 27, 2011 11:06:20 PM

Try another temp-monitoring program as what you see may not be what it really is. Other options include these:

Core Temp
Real Temp
CPUID's Hardware monitor
Hardware Blackbox
... // probably a dozen more yet

This should confirm things. 94C when idling makes no sense at all, unless the heatsink and fan on the GPU is not making contact.
m
0
l
a b U Graphics card
December 27, 2011 11:15:30 PM

Or the GPU fan isn't spinning - try opening the case when the system is running to check.
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
a b U Graphics card
December 27, 2011 11:16:00 PM

Core is a different part of the CPU. You do seem to have strange temperature readings, but remember that readings is all they are. I don't think the GPU could even hit 94C unless, as uli says, the heatsink is totally nonfunctional.
Are all the fans spinning?
m
0
l
December 28, 2011 12:07:01 AM

Okay, I ran a few more tests with some different programs.

Core Temp (I think had some problems detecting the CPU?): http://i.imgur.com/AkTQv.png.

EVEREST had some different numbers for temps: http://i.imgur.com/0vGXz.png.

Ntune, however, also listed the GPU at 90+ degrees temps while idling: http://i.imgur.com/hQhMl.png.

I would like to believe that the EVEREST temps are the most accurate ones, as they state that the CPU and GPU both idle in the 50 degree range.
m
0
l
December 28, 2011 12:27:44 AM

Okay, I checked the case fan and PSU fan. The case fan was running perfectly fine, but the PSU fan wasn't moving. Uh oh.

What to do now? Will I have to replace the fan?
m
0
l
a b U Graphics card
December 28, 2011 12:30:12 AM

Everest is still showing a dangerously high 86C for the GPU. All the programs are saying this so I'm leaning strongly toward the HSF not functioning properly (the heat sink not making contact and the fans not spinning). Open your case cover and look inside to see if you can see the fans spinning on the GPU. If you don't, that's the cause - get a new GPU or GPU fan. With the 6800 GT, chances are, you have AGP.

One alternative, which may help to some extent, is to underclock the GPU. I have no idea how to do that though (I don't see a setting on my Z68 motherboard for the video card's clock). For example on what I mean, if the base clock is 500 MHz (I don't exactly know what the 6800 GT has), set the clock to 400 MHz or even 300 MHz to see if that reduces the temps. Also, if possible, reduce the voltage by about 5 to 10% (if possible) while also underclocking (too low of a voltage and you'll have system instability).
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
a b U Graphics card
December 28, 2011 12:32:51 AM

PSU fan? I think you'll just have to get a new PSU, unless it's jammed in some easily correctable way.
m
0
l
a b U Graphics card
December 28, 2011 12:38:02 AM

A PSU fan not spinning should not be the cause of 90C GPU temps. It does have an effect though as it raises the ambient temps inside your case and with that, the temps of the GPU, though it shouldn't be much more than about 10C. Still, even if it was 15C, that's still dangerously high for your GPU. Thus, including the case where you say the GPU fans are spinning, the heatsink is not making contact which is the primary cause of those dangerously high temps.
m
0
l
December 28, 2011 1:20:43 AM

Well, I powered on the system with the case open and all the fans inside were spinning just fine, including the GPU's.

Here is a pic of the inside of the case (not powered on): http://i.imgur.com/C1tux.jpg.

Looks like there is still some dust in the GPU's fan. That could be problematic.

And FWIW, here's a pic of the nonfunctioning PSU fan: http://i.imgur.com/6n9ML.jpg.

The problem with this fan is perhaps that the blades are brushing up against the sides? I think you can sort of make out some streak marks near the blades.

Anyway, if the main problem is the heatsink not making contact, how could I change that? Is there an easy solution?
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
a b U Graphics card
December 28, 2011 1:27:41 AM

It is likely time to take the card out and remove the heatsink.
Clean off the old grease and reapply the thermal compound.
Literally scrub off all the dust. the little film left on after blowing
the card off is a serious insulator.
m
0
l
December 28, 2011 1:31:10 AM

I'm not very experienced with heatsink removal or using thermal paste. Is it a fairly straightforward task? If not, are there guides out there that would help in doing this?

Thanks.
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
a b U Graphics card
December 28, 2011 1:36:59 AM

I wouldn't be able to find anything for that card honnestly.
m
0
l
a b U Graphics card
December 28, 2011 1:41:43 AM

... Dust. This can have quite an effect if it's particularly bad. Try using a can of compressed air and blow the dust away. An air compressor can also work, but you'll need to either keep a lot of distance (like 2 meters) or put something in the fan to stop it from spinning (spinning too fast will damage it). Removing dust should have a fairly considerable effect.
m
0
l
December 28, 2011 2:25:59 AM

Okay, a few more questions...

Should I remove the GPU from the case before cleaning it with compressed air? It's kind of difficult to get a good angle on the GPU due to its awkward positioning.

Is re-applying thermal paste still necessary? Should I clean out the dust and try it again first to see if the problem is solved? Or do both before testing?

Thanks.
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
a b U Graphics card
December 28, 2011 2:30:16 AM

Removing the card before blowing it out is a good Idea

Reapplying thermal paste might be needed depending on how long the card has been overheating, 8 years is a long time to go without reapplying it in my opinion.

If your parents are still happy with the performance there is no need to upgrade.
I work with someone who still runs a barton 3200 although my 1800+ is long retired.
m
0
l
December 28, 2011 2:39:29 AM

spentshells said:
Removing the card before blowing it out is a good Idea

Reapplying thermal paste might be needed depending on how long the card has been overheating, 8 years is a long time to go without reapplying it in my opinion.

If your parents are still happy with the performance there is no need to upgrade.
I work with someone who still runs a barton 3200 although my 1800+ is long retired.

Yeah the system isn't slow or anything. It actually still runs quite fast. The only problem has been with overheating. If I can stop the overheating the system ought to be good for a while.

I think I will reapply the thermal paste, since it sounds like a good idea. However, I do not have any thermal paste at the moment. Are there any recommended brands? Arctic Silver 5 maybe?
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
a b U Graphics card
December 28, 2011 3:09:34 AM

Get whatever is around. In a low performance system just about anything will do.
AS5 is fine. Honestly the cheapest of thermal pastes will work fine.
When you take apart the card, separate the fan and heatsink and swab them with Qtips
to get off all of the dust as I mentioned the stuff the air doesn't blow out is stuck on there and must be removed.
m
0
l
!