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Having Random Shutdowns on Brand New Build

Last response: in Systems
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September 27, 2011 12:51:52 AM

Here are my specs:

NZXT Phantom Full ATX Case
Intel Core i7-2600k with stock cooling
GIGABYTE GA-Z68XP-UD3P LGA 1155 Intel Z68 Motherboard
Corsair AX750W PSU
6 GB CORSAIR XMS3 DDR3 1600 PC3 12800 RAM
EVGA SuperClocked 015-P3-1582-TR GeForce GTX 580



If you need more detail on those, please ask.

Here is my problem:
I put all the components together very carefully, using antistatic protection. My assistant in building did the same. After a bit of confusion over neglecting to plug in the CPU power cable, We had everything ready to go. We booted into the BIOS and started to install Windows 7. Around 3 minutes into the process, the computer just completely shut down. After repeated tries with the same result, we did a bit of testing to determine what the problem might be- at first we thought the PSU, since its fan was not running, but the Corsair AX750 only runs its fan at 70% load. I also removed the RAM and inserted 1 stick into the proper slot: same result. I ran through the checklist here on Tom's Hardware, and still it shuts off after 3 minutes of runtime.


Any help would be appreciated, I'm VERY stuck. I'm guessing that it is either my motherboard itself or something that is directly connected to it, but I would like someone with more expertise to weight in before I RMA anything.

Thank you.

Edit: I also now have installed a system speaker- at startup it is giving me a single short beep, which according to the manual means there is nothing wrong.
September 27, 2011 1:17:15 AM

Elvirth said:
Here are my specs:

NZXT Phantom Full ATX Case
Intel Core i7-2600k with stock cooling
GIGABYTE GA-Z68XP-UD3P LGA 1155 Intel Z68 Motherboard
Corsair AX750W PSU
6 GB CORSAIR XMS3 DDR3 1600 PC3 12800 RAM
EVGA SuperClocked 015-P3-1582-TR GeForce GTX 580



If you need more detail on those, please ask.

Here is my problem:
I put all the components together very carefully, using antistatic protection. My assistant in building did the same. After a bit of confusion over neglecting to plug in the CPU power cable, We had everything ready to go. We booted into the BIOS and started to install Windows 7. Around 3 minutes into the process, the computer just completely shut down. After repeated tries with the same result, we did a bit of testing to determine what the problem might be- at first we thought the PSU, since its fan was not running, but the Corsair AX750 only runs its fan at 70% load. I also removed the RAM and inserted 1 stick into the proper slot: same result. I ran through the checklist here on Tom's Hardware, and still it shuts off after 3 minutes of runtime.


Any help would be appreciated, I'm VERY stuck. I'm guessing that it is either my motherboard itself or something that is directly connected to it, but I would like someone with more expertise to weight in before I RMA anything.

Thank you.

Edit: I also now have installed a system speaker- at startup it is giving me a single short beep, which according to the manual means there is nothing wrong.


If the PSU's fan isn't spinning, there is a problem with the power supply. The fan should always run. If it isn't... it will get overheated, shut down, and so will your system. RMA the PSU.
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September 27, 2011 1:22:45 AM

I should have clarified that a little more- the fan spins up for a second or so at startup, then enters sleep mode- it's some hybrid fan thing that Corsair does. It will increase or decrease fan speed in response to temperature. And so far I haven't done anything that would build up sufficient heat and turn the fan on. It also works just fine and runs indefinitely if I jump the 24-pin connector and connect only the fans. Are you still sure it's the PSU?

Here is Corsair's explanation for the fan. http://blog.corsair.com/?p=4184
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September 27, 2011 1:40:56 AM

Elvirth said:
I should have clarified that a little more- the fan spins up for a second or so at startup, then enters sleep mode- it's some hybrid fan thing that Corsair does. It will increase or decrease fan speed in response to temperature. And so far I haven't done anything that would build up sufficient heat and turn the fan on. It also works just fine and runs indefinitely if I jump the 24-pin connector and connect only the fans. Are you still sure it's the PSU?

Here is Corsair's explanation for the fan. http://blog.corsair.com/?p=4184

Guess I'm never too old to learn...
I never saw a PSU that was fanless at any load. But, there one is.
Still, I wonder if the fan control might be faulty... not coming on when it should, and causing the PSU to overheat and shut down. That would explain the sudden power loss to the board. When the shut-down occurs, do the system's other fans quit spinning too? If so, that would indicate the power supply shut down.
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September 27, 2011 1:52:08 AM

clutchc said:
Guess I'm never too old to learn...
I never saw a PSU that was fanless at any load. But, there one is.
Still, I wonder if the fan control might be faulty... not coming on when it should, and causing the PSU to overheat and shut down. That would explain the sudden power loss to the board. When the shut-down occurs, do the system's other fans quit spinning too? If so, that would indicate the power supply shut down.


EVERYTHING shuts down. It's a total cutoff. I guess the fan controller/temperature sensor in it could be bad, but so far I haven't noticed any buildup of heat, even with my hand on the PSU throughout the 3 minutes the machine will run.
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September 27, 2011 2:09:03 AM

Elvirth said:
EVERYTHING shuts down. It's a total cutoff. I guess the fan controller/temperature sensor in it could be bad, but so far I haven't noticed any buildup of heat, even with my hand on the PSU throughout the 3 minutes the machine will run.


I'm basing my assumption on the fact that it occurs when you were trying to install the Windows O.S. During the time of O.S. installation, the CPU, HDD, Optical Drive, and memory will all be under load and drawing their normal current. The PSU should surely need to activate its fan by then. I doubt that you could detect excessive heat physically from the PSU case with your hand.
Is it possible to borrow another PSU just to test with? It wouldn't have to be a high wattage unit for simply installing Windows.
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September 27, 2011 2:13:38 AM

Unfortunately I only have two extras available and both are older and much lower-wattage- one is 300W and the other is around 450. both just have the basic 20-pin mobo connector as far as I know and just a few Molex connectors. I am however going to try and see if I can disable automatic PSU fan controls in the BIOS.

EDIT: Turns out I can't disable automatic PSU fan control.
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September 27, 2011 2:22:29 AM

Elvirth said:
Unfortunately I only have two extras available and both are older and much lower-wattage- one is 300W and the other is around 450. both just have the basic 20-pin mobo connector as far as I know and just a few Molex connectors. I am however going to try and see if I can disable automatic PSU fan controls in the BIOS.

EDIT: Turns out I can't disable automatic PSU fan control.

Disabling the auto fan controls would be even better. Keep me updated...
Btw, the single beep is a good sign. Motherboard appears to not be the problem.
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September 27, 2011 2:24:11 AM

I did check my CPU temperature while running the BIOS- is 88 Celsius while just running the BIOS a bad sign? I'm running the stock cooler with Arctic Silver 5 thermal compound applied.
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September 27, 2011 2:32:42 AM

Elvirth said:
I did check my CPU temperature while running the BIOS- is 88 Celsius while just running the BIOS a bad sign? I'm running the stock cooler with Arctic Silver 5 thermal compound applied.

Whoa! That's very hot for idle... or even stressed. We may have found the problem. HSF on OK? Thermal compound ? I'd have to check, but I think max temp is around 100C.
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September 27, 2011 2:35:43 AM

I have taken the HSF off several times since applying my thermal compound- could have contributed to it. I'll take that out and re-do it and see if that helps...
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September 27, 2011 2:44:04 AM

Elvirth said:
I have taken the HSF off several times since applying my thermal compound- could have contributed to it. I'll take that out and re-do it and see if that helps...

That's the thermal I use too. I use the Arctic cleaner and purifier as well. There's a right and wrong way to apply it, but I assume you know how. Even a poor application should not produce those high idle temps, though.
http://www.arcticsilver.com/intel_application_method.ht...
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September 27, 2011 3:26:47 AM

I'm guessing it was badly applied thermal compound coupled with multiple unneeded removals that caused such a bad seal. I'm working on rectifying that at the moment... I'll let you know what the result is.
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September 27, 2011 4:08:27 AM

Elvirth said:
I'm guessing it was badly applied thermal compound coupled with multiple unneeded removals that caused such a bad seal. I'm working on rectifying that at the moment... I'll let you know what the result is.

Very good. And follow the instructions in the link I sent. You need very little and always tin the surfaces first. Another thing... The HSF itself. It's easy to not get a secure installation of the stock HSF to the board, too. Sometimes it seems like the push-pins have opened the 'fingers' under the board, but actually have not. Double-check by looking under the board to see that they have opened and spread securely. I don't know why Intel hasn't come up with something better after all these years...
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September 27, 2011 4:42:14 AM

Alright, the problem appears to have been solved. The seal between HSF and CPU was awful after three removals. Pulled it off, cleaned all surfaces, and reapplied thermal paste according to instructions linked. Everything is working fine, it's idling around 50 C. thanks for your help! Much appreciated.
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September 27, 2011 1:54:05 PM

Elvirth said:
Alright, the problem appears to have been solved. The seal between HSF and CPU was awful after three removals. Pulled it off, cleaned all surfaces, and reapplied thermal paste according to instructions linked. Everything is working fine, it's idling around 50 C. thanks for your help! Much appreciated.

We pretty much worked it out together. But your welcome. Glad to hear it's better.
But from what I've seen checking out others with an i7-2600K, they get lower temps at idle. Upper 30s to lower 40s. My little i3-2100 idles at 38c in a well ventilated case for whatever that comparison is worth. Of course, we don't know if we are talking individual core temps or processor temps. Download and run Core temp and see what it reads per core.
http://www.alcpu.com/CoreTemp/
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September 27, 2011 2:19:02 PM

all done! When your system shutdown just remove cpu and gpu for a few minute then remove psu plug from mobo then fit again correctly.
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September 27, 2011 4:19:22 PM

@clutchc and Elvirth

Good job boys, well done.
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September 27, 2011 4:38:31 PM

Doctor_Den said:
@clutchc and Elvirth

Good job boys, well done.

Why, thank you :-)
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