No boot after power outage

Hello, I was watching Felix do his jump when the power went down, so I turned of the contacts for the current and waited. Once the power was back I turned on the power to the pc and started it up, everything spins and works except there is no beep and the harddisks just spin erratically. nothing happens after the power up.

Iðve remooved every component one at a time waiting for the startup beep, and nothing, I suspect the motherboard to be damaged.

It's an Asus P6t
My question is, should I and or can I try some kind of reset???
15 answers Last reply
More about boot power outage
  1. How did you determine the PSU is working properly?
  2. Did you have it connected to a surge protector? If not, you should, and there is a variety of components that could be damaged, what was your PSU? A quality built PSU should only fail itself and not fry other components.
  3. I'd bought A 650w psu a week before :sarcastic:

    Computer was working nicely for 4 days and then this power outage :(
  4. Was the system connected to a surger protector or ups?
  5. bignastyid said:
    Was the system connected to a surger protector or ups?


    No, I pressed the power button a moment after the lights started dimming and the computer started making another sound, but I had no chance, the power went out bf the button kicked in.

    In hindsight, it whould have been better to reach out behind the pc and just turn the psu off :(
  6. OK so most likely the psu got fried and it probably took out most of the other hardware when it went. So when you buy your new computer invest $20 on a good surge protector.
  7. While I always recommend a surge protector (they are a cheap investment), It is highly possible that in this case a surge protector would not have "saved" his system.

    Surge protectors ONLY protect a system against HIGH amplitude (energy) spikes, ie a lightning hits the Power lines, or very close. It does Nothing to protect against low voltage such as a "brown out" or the Multiple on/off. Low voltage can also be deadly to a PSU. Reason is that the input circuit to the PSU will initially try to compensate for Low AC in. This causes excessive current. A "good" quality PSU should shut down (emphasis on Should), low quality PSU are less likely to shut down and "may "kill" the PSU. This causes both spikes on the Output DC volt rails and/or Low DC outputs which can damage the other computer parts.

    Even if The "brown out" or sudden losses of power does not damage the PSU/MB/GPU/Ram, there is a good possibility that the HDD may be damaged and/or the loss of data or corrupted FAT or MBR. Depends on if the HDD was doing a write and where the write was being done (ie writting a file, or updating the FAT).

    Bottom Line here is that it would be more advantagous (and Highly recommended) to use an UPS. Most UPSs have built in surge protector on input (I still use a surge protector in addition to an UPS). This will prevent the Brown out effect and eilimenate the "on/Off/on/off" that may occur. The UPS (at less decent ones) will keep power applied long enough to allow an orderly shut down, and if unattended will properly shut down the computer when battery time gets low.

    On PSU - Please Identify which make and model - members can then determine if this is a PSU that is of good quality, or one that is best to use as a door stop and NEVER see the light of day inside a computer!

    Next step for you is to try to determine which, if not all, components are bad. Use the troubleshooting guide for new Homebuilt systems.
    Link to TS guide: http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261145-31-perform-steps-posting-post-boot-video-problems
  8. I will get on it once I'm home from work :)
  9. Asus P6T Intel® X58/ ICH10R chipset

    Cooler Master GX - 650W Bronze

    Intel Core i7 930 / 2.8 GHz

    Nvidia GTX560 Ti

    OCZ Reaper DDR3-1866 3x2048MB
    PC3-15000, 1866MHz, CL 9-9-9-28

    3x WD VelociRaptor - 150GB Running Raid5 (Parity)

    All the info I can find + remember atm, will update!
  10. RetiredChief said:
    While I always recommend a surge protector (they are a cheap investment), It is highly possible that in this case a surge protector would not have "saved" his system.

    Surge protectors ONLY protect a system against HIGH amplitude (energy) spikes, ie a lightning hits the Power lines, or very close. It does Nothing to protect against low voltage such as a "brown out" or the Multiple on/off. Low voltage can also be deadly to a PSU. Reason is that the input circuit to the PSU will initially try to compensate for Low AC in. This causes excessive current. A "good" quality PSU should shut down (emphasis on Should), low quality PSU are less likely to shut down and "may "kill" the PSU. This causes both spikes on the Output DC volt rails and/or Low DC outputs which can damage the other computer parts.

    Even if The "brown out" or sudden losses of power does not damage the PSU/MB/GPU/Ram, there is a good possibility that the HDD may be damaged and/or the loss of data or corrupted FAT or MBR. Depends on if the HDD was doing a write and where the write was being done (ie writting a file, or updating the FAT).

    Bottom Line here is that it would be more advantagous (and Highly recommended) to use an UPS. Most UPSs have built in surge protector on input (I still use a surge protector in addition to an UPS). This will prevent the Brown out effect and eilimenate the "on/Off/on/off" that may occur. The UPS (at less decent ones) will keep power applied long enough to allow an orderly shut down, and if unattended will properly shut down the computer when battery time gets low.

    On PSU - Please Identify which make and model - members can then determine if this is a PSU that is of good quality, or one that is best to use as a door stop and NEVER see the light of day inside a computer!

    Next step for you is to try to determine which, if not all, components are bad. Use the troubleshooting guide for new Homebuilt systems.
    Link to TS guide: http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261145-31-perform-steps-posting-post-boot-video-problems


    This is probably the best definition of your problem you are going to get.

    Personally i have a good PSU on my desktop at home (Spain), and since the electric power there is pure bullshit, i could get up to 20 blackouts in a summer. This has effectivly fried my monitor, and entire PC.
    Since i have this high quality PSU (Thermaltake thoughtpower 700W), my new pc has survived 5+ years, so i recommend a good PSU and a good pwr surge protection later on (personally im already thinking of a SAI to keep my baby safe :D).
  11. This is not a PSU I'd recommend after just a quick check.
    NOTE there are two versions with and without the word "Bronze" The newer model with the Bronze attached is better than the orginal (Cooler master change OEM manufacture).

    Read: http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/CoolerMaster/GX650W_Bronze/8.html

    Then looking at Newegg reviews, I would have taken a pass on that PSU. As you may have found out saving a few dollar on a loower end PSU can cost you MUCH more in the end.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=17-171-052&SortField=0&SummaryType=0&Pagesize=10&PurchaseMark=&SelectedRating=1&VideoOnlyMark=False&VendorMark=&IsFeedbackTab=true&Keywords=%28keywords%29&Page=1
  12. Yup, as I said before, from what I have read a quality PSU should fail without destroying other components, although it can still happen. When I began looking for PC components I began with a distrust of Coolermaster for anything, I am sorry, but if a company has to explain their greatness in their name I do not trust them lol.
  13. RetiredChief said:
    This is not a PSU I'd recommend after just a quick check.
    NOTE there are two versions with and without the word "Bronze" The newer modle with the Bronze attached is better than the orginal (Cooler master change OEM manufacture).

    Read: http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/CoolerMaster/GX650W_Bronze/8.html

    Then looking at Newegg reviews, I would have taken a pass on that PSU. As you may have found out saving a few dollar on a loower end PSU can cost you MUCH more in the end.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=17-171-052&SortField=0&SummaryType=0&Pagesize=10&PurchaseMark=&SelectedRating=1&VideoOnlyMark=False&VendorMark=&IsFeedbackTab=true&Keywords=%28keywords%29&Page=1


    It is the bronze version, I'm about to send the pc to a certified shop now, my insurance company demands it.

    Thing is, if my claim is valid, then my insurance company will get the money from the power company insurance. Does that make any sence lol

    Anyway, crossing fingers and hoping for a healthy return on cash :sarcastic:
  14. Here's wishing you good luck.
    PS - Get a Good UPS and protect the investment in a new, or repaired, system.
  15. This will happen every single time you lose power with an Asus MB. Unplug the computer and hold the power button in for 10-30 seconds. Usually you will hear a popping sound when the MB discharges.

    If that doesn't work, unplug the 24-pin connector from the power supply to the motherboard. Again, you will hear a pop when the motherboard discharges. Reconnect the 24-pin connector, and the computer will start normally.
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