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Overheating Issues

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December 30, 2011 3:50:32 AM

I have a HP Pavilion dv8 that has recently started to overheat doing the most simplest tasks such as browsing the internet, using Microsoft Excel, etc.

When browsing the internet my internal CPU Temperature rises to about 75-80C per Core (4 Cores). Then when I do gaming the temperatures quickly rise to around 95-100C.

The games that are causing this are games that I have played before without any issues and I play them at the recommended settings for my computer.

Here are my parts:
- Intel Core i7 Q820 1.7Ghz
- 8GBs of Ram
- Nvidia GeForce GT 230M

I have cleaned up my hard drive of useless files that I don't need and uninstalled all of my Steam games that I am currently not playing. I have scanned the computer and found no viruses/malware/adware/etc. I have cleaned the fan as best as I can, but the laptop does not allow direct access to the fan without voiding the warranty.

Basically, I'm out of ideas on what could be causing this.

EDIT: My CPU is actually running at 92-94C now and the only programs open are FireFox and Core Temp.

More about : overheating issues

December 30, 2011 7:21:32 AM

That is way too hot, are your fans running? are they clogged with dust?
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a c 80 à CPUs
December 30, 2011 7:49:18 AM

your temps are too high.
have you cleaned your laptop's vents/airways?
use a can of compressed air, hold it upright, and spray it into the cpu cooling vent. also clean other areas that flow air into/outside the laptop.
you could try getting a laptop cooler.
if that doesn't solve the problem, you could contact hp customer support with your problem (as long as the laptop is under warranty).
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a b à CPUs
December 30, 2011 8:59:05 AM

de5_Roy said:

use a can of compressed air, hold it upright, and spray it into the cpu cooling vent. also clean other areas that flow air into/outside the laptop.


You shouldn't do that. If there is a lot of dust in there, you only blow it more into the laptop. Even if you manage to blow it away from the heat sink, it's still in your laptop adding up even more. A very temporary solution at least.

If you do no longer have warranty, open up the laptop yourself to clean the interior. If you don't think/feel like you can do that, look for a hardware shop/friends/relatives/whoever can do it. It's not that hard, if one is carefully and does some research. There are disassemble manuals for most laptops, that can at least be adopted for your one.

There is also a good chance that the heat transfer paste on your CPU and/or GPU is dried, especially since the laptop is running very hot for some time now. Which means if the laptop is open already, get some new paste onto the cpu, too. That won't hurt, even if it's not dried out yet.
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a c 185 à CPUs
December 30, 2011 9:03:13 AM

Also try a laptop cooler! :lol: 
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a c 80 à CPUs
December 30, 2011 9:12:37 AM

whatsthatnoise said:
You shouldn't do that. If there is a lot of dust in there, you only blow it more into the laptop. Even if you manage to blow it away from the heat sink, it's still in your laptop adding up even more. A very temporary solution at least.

If you do no longer have warranty, open up the laptop yourself to clean the interior. If you don't think/feel like you can do that, look for a hardware shop/friends/relatives/whoever can do it. It's not that hard, if one is carefully and does some research. There are disassemble manuals for most laptops, that can at least be adopted for your one.

There is also a good chance that the heat transfer paste on your CPU and/or GPU is dried, especially since the laptop is running very hot for some time now. Which means if the laptop is open already, get some new paste onto the cpu, too. That won't hurt, even if it's not dried out yet.

yes, there is a chance of gathering more dust inside by blowing air into the laptop case. from the OP i gathered that the laptop in under warranty and if the case was opened, the warranty would be void. thus the 'temporary solution'.
opening the case and digging out all the dirt is the best way to clean, i do that to my old laptop every few months. but with my new one (under warranty), i just blow air with a blower when temp get a bit too high. after 'blowage' the temps come down to average level. also opening the laptop up takes experience and expertise, i learned that the hard way when i opened my first laptop.
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December 30, 2011 3:19:27 PM

If you don't mind voiding your warranty I would say open it up and clean all the dust out along with cleaning your cpu and putting some arctic silver 5 paste on there. But if you don't want to do that the best you can really do is use compressed air for the dust and buy a laptop cooler. Or call HP, but that will probably be a huge hassle.
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December 30, 2011 3:27:34 PM

I had that problems with my laptop.
I personally contact HP and this is what they replay to me.

Hello Andy,

Thank you for contacting HP total care.

From your email I understand that you are using HP Pavilion g7-1075dx Notebook PC and experiencing an issue with pc overheating. When you turn on the notebook the temperature for your pc and the motherboard is 48C. However after 10 to 20 minutes it will go up to 63C for cpu and 65C for motherboard and it continues till 2 to 3 hours. You have researched your own and found that the normal temperature for notebook and Desktop pc’s are 55~60C and anything more than that is not good for your pc and also for its battery life.


Andy, your e-mail is important to us and helping you resolve the issue is our utmost priority. We will try our best and utilize all our resources to ensure that the issue is completely resolved.

I appreciate the effort that you have taken to resolve this issue and I would also like to appreciate the technical knowledge you have.

I, on behalf of HP Total Care take ownership of your issue. I will definitely assist you in this matter up to the best of my abilities.

I would like to inform you that a PC temperature mainly depends on its power supply and the availability of RAM cards. You might have seen in websites that a normal pc temperature is 48C however it is not true always. If the processor you are using on your pc is an advanced one and uses a higher technology then the processor temperature will definitely be high.

I have checked the product specification and found that you have AMD Phenom II Dual-Core Mobile Processor P650 installed on your pc. The normal temperature of this processor is 60C to 80C. Thus you may experience a higher temperature on this pc and it is normal.

However in order to reduce the heat and to maintain your pc performance please visit the links mentioned below and perform the steps accordingly.

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c01...

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c02...


The best way to get a answer is contact your manufacture.
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December 30, 2011 3:41:03 PM

I will attempt to open up the laptop and clean it out that way.

EDIT: Well I just booted up the computer after opening it up and taking it a part. There was definitely quite a bit of dust in there. For once my computer didn't boot up with the fan already on.

Current Temperature: 60-64C

I'm going to run a game and see how hot it gets doing that.
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December 30, 2011 6:57:51 PM

Best answer selected by PioneerRaptor.
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