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Ram timing above standerd

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October 18, 2012 2:50:02 PM

I have a kit of ram that is 1866 and I've never really bothered to mess with it. I'm told that 1866 is NOT the highest supported standerd RAM for an AMD CPU. How can I do such adjusting? Thanks for any help or advice.

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a c 114 } Memory
October 18, 2012 4:16:14 PM

The necessary adjustments depends on your CPU. Please provide CPU model, motherboard model, and I can tell you the needed changes.

Thank you
GSKILL SUPPORT

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a b à CPUs
a b } Memory
October 18, 2012 4:43:44 PM

Well, you will have to O.C. it to get it performing any higher. The CPU likely supports higher speeds, but does your MOBO? With Intel, they have XMP which is a pre-set profile that safely brings your memory up to its rated speed. My MOBO has XMP support up to at least 2133 (so it is listed on the board specs without an (O.C.) next to it, and this may not be the case on my board exactly I cannot recall, but lets say it lists 2400 (O.C.) that means there is no XMP profile to achieve that speed but if I want to manually overclock the RAM to 2400 it can be achieved on the MOBO). The listed speed of your RAM is the recommended/maximum running speed, it can safely run at that speed but it doesn't mean your MOBO will support it. If I wanted to get 2400mhz speed on my MOBO, I would have to buy RAM rated to 2400 and overclock it manually up to that speed, it is not a simple task like setting the XMP profile to the XMP RAM speed on the MOBO (as I said 2133 supported on my board with XMP, 2400 is supported with manual overclocking). It would probably not be advisable to take a lower rated speed ram (your 1866) and to OC it to 2133 unless you know what your doing.
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a c 114 } Memory
October 18, 2012 11:39:41 PM

CPU Host Frequency will need to be 233 for DDR3-1866. That CPU can only support DDR3-1600 max, so overclock settings are necessary for DDR3-1866.

Note, this will also overclock your CPU Frequency, so you should lower the CPU Ratio if this is not desired.

CPU-NB Frequency should be 2800MHz, or 12X (233 * 12 = ~2800).

Then set DRAM Timings to tCL 9 - tRCD 10 - tRP 9 - tRAS 28 (that the memory is rated for).

DRAM Voltage 1.50V, this is default, but it should still be manually set.

Lastly, CPU-NB Voltage 1.20V. This will help the CPU fully support DDR3-1866 since AMD Phenom II technically supports two modules of DDR3-1600 only.

Once that is complete, your system should be ready to go. Keep us posted on the result.

Thank you
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October 19, 2012 2:17:15 PM

I'm not exactly sure how to set any of that.. Sadly. I'm new to the whole... adjustment and overclocking stuff. I built my computer with what I thought would be standard set stuff and all supported together, even studied up for 8 months multiple sites.

But anyway, I'm assuming I have to go into the bios, correct? Start up, head into bios, and check out the timings and such. I've CPU-Z to check everything. Is there any positive way I can check what my timings of my ram are?
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a b à CPUs
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October 19, 2012 2:34:36 PM

To be honest, if you are not sure what you are doing, and you RAM is already running at it's rated speed (1866mhz), then you probably don't need to OC your RAM, the performance gain is going to be extremely minor anyways, I doubt you will notice any change.

Even if it is running lower than the rated speed (probably 1333), many builders will use that speed RAM even for gaming PC's, as today's RAM is all fairly fast, at least for general use and gaming.
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a b à CPUs
a c 114 } Memory
October 19, 2012 4:18:53 PM

Yes, go into BIOS, in the MIT page, you will see all the options for CPU and memory.

Look for the options a mentioned and manually input the values. Refer to your motherboard user's manual as it will have information on this as well.

For CPU-Z, look in the memory tab, that is what the memory is operating at.

DRAM Frequency will show half, 667MHz (DDR3-1333) or 800MHz (DDR3-1600), since it is displaying real frequency, instead of effective frequency.

Thank you
GSKILL SUPPORT

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October 19, 2012 4:23:48 PM

Chugot, I'm more into just getting as much performance out of only 8 gigs of ram. I do lots of multitasking and would like to have no lag back. Especially when it comes to multiple game based applications and social programs such as a livestreaming program running, a game, a server, and say.. Skype.

Gskill Support, thank you for the help. I'll finish this forum when I get it all working.
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a b } Memory
October 19, 2012 4:27:29 PM

Yes, what I am saying though, is that the performance in those programs will not increase much by OC'ing the RAM, they would benefit from additional RAM however.
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