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Is my motherboard overheating?

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October 20, 2012 11:04:24 AM

I've hit a serious set back in my recent PC build and I've kind of reached the point I'm not sure what to do.
FYI, I've got a Asus P6t7 Supercomputer WS. I bought it refurbished from ebay.
My question is, would 115 F too hot for this Mobo? Hot enough to cause it to not start up? Computer specs at at the bottom.
Read the symtoms below if you want to know how I came to where I am with this.

I finished the build, loaded up Windows 7 and everything seemed fine. It doesn't freeze up or anything. I've run it for about a maximum of 5 hours. Seems great. Then I shut it down. But I remembered I needed to quickly do something else. Hit the power button and the computer starts for about half a second (light briefly comes on, fans start to spin) and then nothing. Hit power again, nothing. Unplug power cable, plug back in, hit power, same things as at first, starts to power on for a split second, then stops.

I pulled out everything except for a stick of ram, CPU, and 1 video card (it has 3 GTX480's). Nothing. Have to unplug it and plug the power back in just to get it to try. I fool around for about an hour trying various combinations (using different video card, different stick of ram), reset CMOS and all the sudden it decides to boot one of these times. Experimentally I decide to start sticking things back in one at a time but everything is fine all the way and it works great again.

Except for if I run the computer for 30 minutes to an hour, same thing, it doesn't want to start-up again after a shutdown. So I wait 30 or 40 minutes and try again and it will start up. So at this point I think it most be overheating if it needs to cool down before it will start again.

My guess is the motherboard is perhaps overheating? I run it for 30 minutes and check the temperatures in the bios. CPU stays aroun 95-98 F while Mobo gets up to 115 F. I think it's got to be those 3 GPU's heating it up so I threw in another fan at the bottom of the case to act an intake fan. Doesn't help.

I need this particular mobo cause I need the bandwidth for the 3 GTX480's, as I'm building a Davinci Resolve machine, and the more cuda cores, the better.
It seems I can only find the motherboard used or refurbed as it's getting a bit dated. I'm tempted to buy another used one off ebay as I need to urgently get this thing up and running sometime in the next 8 days. I suppose there is the possibility that the GPU's could be overheating as well stacked 3 in a row. I'm not sure. Maybe it's just a bad motherboard.

I wouldn't mind buying a new mobo alternative if I could find one. Would have to be X58 chipset with enough space for the 3x gtx 480's (double-space cards) and 1x additional PCI express space clear of the GPU's.

Any help or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Computer details:
Motherboard: Asus P6t7 Supercomputer WS
RAM: CORSAIR DDR3 DESKTOP VENGEANCE 4gb x6 for 24GB RAM
GPUs: 3x EGVA 480's (yes, 3 of them)
CPU: Intel Core i7 960 3.2GHz 8MB LGA 1366 Quad Core
3x 2TB Seagate Barracuda
OCZ Agility 4 128GB SATA3
Blackmagic DeckLink HD Extreme 3D card
Raidmax 1200 Watt PSU
Arctic Cooling Freezer 13 Cooler for CPU
Thermaltake Level 10 GT case with an extra 90mm intake fan added
a b V Motherboard
October 20, 2012 11:32:40 AM

*cough*celcius*cough*
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October 20, 2012 11:35:31 AM

neon neophyte said:
*cough*celcius*cough*

Sorry, It lists in both formats and I wasn't sure what was the standard :) 
115F = 46C

I just did a test again and this time it got up to 48C
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a b V Motherboard
October 20, 2012 11:37:10 AM

that probably is too warm for a motherboard. is it possible to cool it by adding a fan or replacing a current fan with a better one?

can you try opening the case and using a regular fan to blow a lot of air over the board, just to test if the motherboard overheating is the problem?
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October 20, 2012 11:56:09 AM

neon neophyte said:
that probably is too warm for a motherboard. is it possible to cool it by adding a fan or replacing a current fan with a better one?

can you try opening the case and using a regular fan to blow a lot of air over the board, just to test if the motherboard overheating is the problem?

Thanks for the advice. I added another fan today and left the case open during all my tests. No effect.
I bet it's this piece of crap mobo from ebay shipped from china as a refurbed unit that's the culprit.

I'm going to pull the trigger on another X58 chipset mobo/CPU combo on the local auction site tonight and see how it goes. Hate to throw cash at the problem but this rig is booked for a $2500 job in a little over a week's time and if I don't have the rig, I can't do the job :( 
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a b V Motherboard
October 20, 2012 1:31:52 PM

It may be a bad board. Although those are three of the hottest gpus you can find and they do restrict air to the motherboard, it is designed to work under those conditions as long as you have good airflow in the case. It may very well be your power supply though as Raidmax is not a good brand. I would first get the board replaced and if you still run into issues, change that power supply to a Seasonic as they are the best psu manufacturer out there.
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October 27, 2012 5:52:41 AM

Best answer selected by redlight1.
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October 27, 2012 6:00:04 AM

maestro0428 said:
It may be a bad board. Although those are three of the hottest gpus you can find and they do restrict air to the motherboard, it is designed to work under those conditions as long as you have good airflow in the case. It may very well be your power supply though as Raidmax is not a good brand. I would first get the board replaced and if you still run into issues, change that power supply to a Seasonic as they are the best psu manufacturer out there.


Sorry about the delay in getting back to this. Power Supply was the correct guess. When I hooked up a new mobo/CPU, it wouldn't even start. Fooled around plugging different stuff and out and it would sometimes start but it wasn't consistent about what was plugged in to get it to start. And on top of that, same thing as before. When it would start, after running 30 minutes or so, wouldn't start again until it cooled down. This made me suspect you were right about the PSU.

Went out and bought a Corsair 1200w, which is the only 1200w PSU i could find in stock after calling 6 computer shops. Immediately after installing, it worked great. No problems since. Swapped the old mobo/cpu back in, still working great.

Now I have an extra mobo/cpu but it's cool as I was looking at building a separate editing system for the office in a few months anyway.

Thanks for all the help everyone. Really appreciate it! I was about to be put off from building my own PC's in the future but now I'm actually kind of like the feeling of getting to the bottom of this and making a system work. Looking forward to my next build!
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