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Will this work? (first time build)

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September 30, 2011 3:01:30 PM

hey, first off first post, sorry if its in the wrong place or difficult to read, wanting to build my own PC for gaming once i have some money, pretty confident i can do it and have chosen parts, but want to check with some more experienced people if this build will work, i think it should handle mostly every thing, even if they are on medium settings, also want to know if windows 7 64 the way to go or stick to vista that i know? parts(hope i have them all, not sure if i need a sound card?);

Case: black phantom -
http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B003WE9WQY/ref=ox_sc...
motherboard: asus 1155 P8P67 EVO REV 3.0 S/L -
http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B004OA3UWW/ref=ox_sc...
CPU: sandybridge i7 2600k-
http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B004FA8NOQ/ref=ox_sc...
GPU: nVIDIA gforce gtx 560 (asus) -
http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B0050MUTTA/ref=ox_sc...
RAM: corsair vengance 8 gb kit -
http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B004CRSM4I/ref=ox_sc...
HDD: western digital 2tb SATA -
http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B004VFJ9MK/ref=ox_sc...
CPU fan: Noctua NH-D14 -
http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B002VKVZ1A/ref=ox_sc...
network card: tp link 150mps -
http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B0036AFAEW/ref=ox_sc...
PSU: corsair CMPSU-750HX 750W -
http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B002FJ47IA/ref=ox_sc...

and some thermal past, but don't think that needs to be listed :) 

want to know if its all compatible, any better prices or same/ better stuff that i missed as i only used amazon which I'm sure ill be told is terrible, and if my expectation of this being able to do play most games at medium settings are correct, thanks in advance



More about : work time build

September 30, 2011 3:19:42 PM

Everything should work together. But I would suggest stepping down to an i5 2500k and get a better video card, since your main purpose is gaming right? From what I know, the i7 using multi threading which games don't really use now. Plus, you can OC the i5 and get the same performance. The $$ saved can be used to upgrade to 560 ti or other.

This is from my own experience but I'll let the experts chime in. I just build my first PC as well (see below in sig). Use newegg and other review sites to get as much information as possible. Look are reviews for the parts you got and forums so you don't get any surprises once you have everything. Knowledge is power!
September 30, 2011 3:23:45 PM

thanks, im a bit weary to OCing as dont want to damage anything, and depending on how long i can wait to get more money might get gtx 580 (http://www.amazon.co.uk/EVGA-015-P3-1582-KR-PCI-Express...), or 560ti, but def dont want to oc, espicaly my processor so will probs stick wiht i7, thanks for the advice and quick responce.
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September 30, 2011 3:37:42 PM

For a single or even SLI'ed 560ti, you need just a 650W PSU.
September 30, 2011 3:41:38 PM

ahh ok thanks, should i still keep the 750W one so i have room to upgrade? or if i do go for the 580? also sli is an area im not to confident on, have heard its not always good in some cases and can make games run slower, and also coultent find how to do it, do you need a splitter thing or a motherboard with 2 PCI-Es?
thanks
September 30, 2011 3:54:46 PM

the i5 and i7 are essentially identical for gaming. If you aren't doing other more thread intensive tasks, then the few games that do use more than 4 threads will get an ever so tiny boost compared to the i5. So more or less, I'd never suggest an i7 for a purely gaming build since the $100 is better spent elsewhere.

I'd take all the money saved and dump it into a better graphics card or possibly a SSD (or pocket it for later).

Definitely go with Windows 7 (much better than Vista) unless you plan on re-using the OS and want to save the money. Even then I'd probably upgrade to 7. You can buy the OEM version and it'll save you half the cost (at least in the US). You don't need a sound card either unless you are an audiophile.

Also, this is just me, but that is a lot of money for a case. You really don't need a full tower, and a half tower would probably be sufficient and cost less. I know the Antec 300 and Haf 912 are popular choices. Of course a lot of it comes down to personal preference with looks, so whatever.
September 30, 2011 3:55:56 PM

I would use a 300 N-wireless instate of the 150 that you chose
September 30, 2011 3:56:44 PM

If you're sure you do not want to overclock, then there's no point in buying the "k" version, that will save you a few bucks. As others have said the extra cost for an i72600k is not worth it for gaming, as discussed in the "gaming processor" articles on this website. so buy an i52500 (NOT the "k" version), and stick with the stock CPU fan because it will cool it just fine, you don't need to buy an aftermarket one unless you're overclocking.

you also do not need to buy a separate network card, there is a network port on that motherboard (2 it looks like).

You made a good choice in RAM, basically any 1600mhz RAM with CAS9 timings at the best price you can find is the way to go. more expensive RAM will not benefit you at ALL.

i also agree with the other person that your power supply is overkill at 750W, I would choose an Antec Earthwatts or any other power supply with an 80plus certification (bronze or better), with 450W or more. If you are buying a higher wattage power supply to allow future addition of a second video card in SLI, then a 750W may not be a bad idea (though still probably overkill, but not that much more expensive than 650W).

EDIT: I did not realize the network card you selected was wireless. Is it absolutely necessary that you use wireless? Gaming is very unreliable over a wireless connection, and in my experience wireless network cards in a PC tower are less reliable than in a laptop or other devices (probably due to interference and proximity to walls/floor). If you MUST use wireless, I'd recommend getting a card with an external antenna that you can put further away or up on your desk, it will be more reliable.
September 30, 2011 4:12:37 PM

nordlead said:
the i5 and i7 are essentially identical for gaming. If you aren't doing other more thread intensive tasks, then the few games that do use more than 4 threads will get an ever so tiny boost compared to the i5. So more or less, I'd never suggest an i7 for a purely gaming build since the $100 is better spent elsewhere.

I'd take all the money saved and dump it into a better graphics card or possibly a SSD (or pocket it for later).

Definitely go with Windows 7 (much better than Vista) unless you plan on re-using the OS and want to save the money. Even then I'd probably upgrade to 7. You can buy the OEM version and it'll save you half the cost (at least in the US). You don't need a sound card either unless you are an audiophile.

Also, this is just me, but that is a lot of money for a case. You really don't need a full tower, and a half tower would probably be sufficient and cost less. I know the Antec 300 and Haf 912 are popular choices. Of course a lot of it comes down to personal preference with looks, so whatever.


ill probs stick to i7 as i do use a few aplications at a time, mc server for few friends, mc browser with 20-30 tabs at times, and like it all to be super fast, was thinking about a SSD for a boot drive, but could that be done later if needed? and is it possible to change the os drive with an OEM version, def gona stick with the case, heard it has good circulation which is a must for my small room that can get prety hot, and its got all the wire managment so looks goood for first build.

EDIT: thanks for the advice, espicaly on os
September 30, 2011 4:19:19 PM

torque79 said:
If you're sure you do not want to overclock, then there's no point in buying the "k" version, that will save you a few bucks. As others have said the extra cost for an i72600k is not worth it for gaming, as discussed in the "gaming processor" articles on this website. so buy an i52500 (NOT the "k" version), and stick with the stock CPU fan because it will cool it just fine, you don't need to buy an aftermarket one unless you're overclocking.

you also do not need to buy a separate network card, there is a network port on that motherboard (2 it looks like).

You made a good choice in RAM, basically any 1600mhz RAM with CAS9 timings at the best price you can find is the way to go. more expensive RAM will not benefit you at ALL.

i also agree with the other person that your power supply is overkill at 750W, I would choose an Antec Earthwatts or any other power supply with an 80plus certification (bronze or better), with 450W or more. If you are buying a higher wattage power supply to allow future addition of a second video card in SLI, then a 750W may not be a bad idea (though still probably overkill, but not that much more expensive than 650W).

EDIT: I did not realize the network card you selected was wireless. Is it absolutely necessary that you use wireless? Gaming is very unreliable over a wireless connection, and in my experience wireless network cards in a PC tower are less reliable than in a laptop or other devices (probably due to interference and proximity to walls/floor). If you MUST use wireless, I'd recommend getting a card with an external antenna that you can put further away or up on your desk, it will be more reliable.


like i said in above post, i7 is a must as i run many applications at once and like them fast as possible. the difference between the k and not k is £6 so will keep the k so i have the option to overclock in future to save on upgrades, and for that reason will probs keep the aftermarket fan to.

wireless is a must, cant run a 10 meter cable to my router, and have a wireless card somewhere in my pc atm, dno were but works fine never had to many problems gaming with it, but wanted a new one bc this pc is 2008 ish now so that cards probs faster.

reason i went with 750 is i used a calculator on newegg that said i would need about 716, not sure how accrute that is but thought i would round it up for some leway.

thanks for the advice
September 30, 2011 5:11:53 PM

newegg's PSU caculator tends to be on the high side. There are some valid reasons for this, mostly due no PSU manufacturers not putting real specifications on their products. With that said, if you buy a size newegg suggests from a reputable brand then you are guaranteed to be on the safe side. If you really need to save the money then the most accurate method is to add it all up yourself, find a PSU that says it meets your needs, and then read an independent review that actually proves that the PSU meets the claimed specs at high temperatures and full load. For adding up the power requirements Tom's has an article on picking the right sized PSU that has a handy chart, or there are a few extreme power usage calculators.

As for OEM OSs, the only effective difference between OEM and retail is that OEM must stay with the "licensed computer". You are free to replace broken parts or make minor upgrades. If windows complains then I know you can call Microsoft and they'll reset the key for free. I think the only way they won't is if you do a complete overhaul of the system. The only reason I'd suggest getting a retail copy is if you were an early adopter of windows 7 and you upgrade your PC every 1-2 years. The reality is that Windows 8 will probably be out by the time you want to upgrade and you can again buy the OEM version for half the cost of retail.
September 30, 2011 10:16:56 PM

ScrewySqrl said:
For a single or even SLI'ed 560ti, you need just a 650W PSU.

For 6950's a 650w psu, but from what Iv'e seen on Guru 3D, and Hard OCP...a 750w for dual 560 ti's in SLI.
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