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7050M-M: Can I use WakeOnLAN w/PCI NIC??

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  • Elitegroup
  • NIC
  • PCI
  • Motherboards
Last response: in Motherboards
October 23, 2012 9:11:08 AM

I have an HTPC running on an old ECS 7050M-M board, using a RealTek PCI gigabit NIC. I'm trying to make WOL (Wake On LAN) work, but it seems like the mobo is not giving power to the PCI card (when I put the PC into S3 sleep, the lights on the NIC turn off, as well as the light on the router for the jack connected to the HTPC).

Windows 7 64-bit, Netgear WNR3500L router, gigabit switch. I don't think any of these are relevant though, since I'm not seeing the NIC's light stay on when the HTPC goes to sleep.

I believe I have all BIOS, firewall, router and windows settings changed correctly in order to use WOL, and if I use a magic packet monitor with the HTPC running, I can verify that I am successfully sending a magic packet from another machine to the HTPC.

Is there something I need to change/configure in order to make sure that the PCI slot is giving the necessary power to the NIC so that it can stay awake listening for the magic packet?

More about : 7050m wakeonlan pci nic

October 29, 2012 10:19:07 PM

ky_ecsusa said:
Please enable "Resume by PCI/PCI-E/Lan PME" inside the Poewr Management Setup which is in BIOS menu. You can check the following link for more information:

http://www.ecs.com.tw/ECSWebSite/Support/Support_FAQ_De...


thanks for the reply and sorry it's taken me so long to respond...

Yes, I've already done the obvious BIOS settings, including "resume by PCI/etc". I've forwarded a port on the router, added an exception in Windows Firewall, and set relevant devices to "allow to wake computer", all of which seem to be working because I can catch the packet with the monitor when the machine is running.

The fact that the ethernet port doesn't have a light on maakes me think that the PCI card just isn't getting power.

Any other suggestions?
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a b V Motherboard
October 29, 2012 11:28:54 PM

You may need to check the PCI lan card manufacturer for the LED setting. Can you wake up the system? If yes, it means that there is a power to the LAN card while the system is off.
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November 8, 2012 9:31:50 PM

ky_ecsusa said:
You may need to check the PCI lan card manufacturer for the LED setting. Can you wake up the system? If yes, it means that there is a power to the LAN card while the system is off.


I think I must not have been clear enough... I'm trying to get WOL to work, but it does not work. I'm pretty sure that my NIC supports WOL, since it is a recently purchased gigabit PCI NIC from Realtek. I'm away from the computer now but I looked at specs for all Realtek NICs that match that description, and they all say:

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To achieve the most efficient power management possible, Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) power management support is provided for modern operating systems that are capable of Operating System directed Power Management (OSPM).
In addition to the ACPI feature, the RTL8110S-32 supports remote wake-up (including AMD Magic Packet, Re-LinkOk, and Microsoft® Wake-up frame) in both ACPI and APM (Advanced Power Management) environments. The LWAKE pin provides four different output signals including active high, active low, positive pulse, and negative pulse. The versatility of the LWAKE pin provides motherboards with Wake-On-LAN (WOL) functionality. To support WOL from a deep power down state (e.g. D3cold, i.e. main power is off and only auxiliary exists), the auxiliary power source must be able to provide the needed power for the RTL8110S-32.
----------------------

I'm pretty sure the NIC is not getting the power it needs from the Mobo, since its lights are off. But my Mobo's specs/manual say that it supports WOL. I guess I haven't tried WOL on the MoBo's native NIC (10/100), which I have disabled now.

I can wake the computer with activity from a wireless keyboard, so Wake-on-USB appears to be fine.

And as I said, I think I've configured everything correctly in my home network, because when I run a packet monitor and then send a magic packet over the LAN from another computer or my phone, the monitor correctly receives and reports the event.

I'm wondering if there's something else I need to do, either in BIOS or physically on the Mobo (jumper?) to make it give power to the NIC.
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a b V Motherboard
November 8, 2012 10:10:00 PM

As we mentioned to you before, the only setting needs to be enable is "Resume by PCI/PCI-E/Lan PME". There is no jumper to control the PCI slot power. The LED light on network adapter is off doesn't mean there is no power to the PCI slot while the system is off. Why you just go ahead to test the onboard lan?
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November 16, 2012 7:44:26 AM

ky_ecsusa said:
As we mentioned to you before, the only setting needs to be enable is "Resume by PCI/PCI-E/Lan PME". There is no jumper to control the PCI slot power. The LED light on network adapter is off doesn't mean there is no power to the PCI slot while the system is off. Why you just go ahead to test the onboard lan?


Right, but as I've said, I've done that (made sure "Resume by PCI..." is enabled).

Your comment about the LED light is confusing to me ... I thought that the light being off *did* indicate that the NIC was not receiving power from the PCI slot. Isn't that pretty much universally true?

OK, I'll try the onboard NIC, just to test, but ultimately that won't solve my problem, because the onboard NIC is 10/100 and I need my connection to be 10/100/1000. Also, even if onboard NIC works, That won't really prove much about where the problem is. But I'll try it - I guess if it doesn't work that will be more useful info.

thanks
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