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Print vs Digital Aspect ratio

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Anonymous
April 7, 2005 1:47:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Is there any lab that would print a 1.33 aspect ratio format?

Shooting digital I always need to accommodate to some of the 'usual'
1.4 (7x5), 1.5 (6x4 9x6 12x8) or 1.25 (10x8 5x4) formats just to name
some popular ones. It seems that as many different formats as there
are, there is not a 1,33 one!!!

How can this be? given the popularity of digital format now?

Pasiasoloco
Anonymous
April 7, 2005 3:59:25 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Paiasoloco wrote:
> Is there any lab that would print a 1.33 aspect ratio format?
>
> Shooting digital I always need to accommodate to some of the 'usual'
> 1.4 (7x5), 1.5 (6x4 9x6 12x8) or 1.25 (10x8 5x4) formats just to name
> some popular ones. It seems that as many different formats as there
> are, there is not a 1,33 one!!!
>
> How can this be? given the popularity of digital format now?
>
> Pasiasoloco

Of late I have taken to cropping my photos to match the size I am
printing to, setting the DPI to 300. I find that most of my photos can
stand some cropping and so this is not a big issue. My 20D takes
photos that are 2:3 and so fit many print sizes, my F828 is a 3:4 ratio
and so I have to either crop or put in a border, either way does not
take a lot of work.

Scott
Anonymous
April 7, 2005 6:04:48 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I realise that it's not a lot of work if you have to make 5, 10 event
50 at a time. But what happened to me and am sure it is a very common
scenario it that on a 7 day trip to NY I took around 70 shots a day,
that's 490 photos. After selection (which already takes a lot of time
for me) I ended up with about 200 to upload to Mpix. From there I had
to select size for either 1 photo at a time or the whole lot at once.
Then go into the cropping feature they have which lets you specify
where to make the crop given the selected format for every photo, then
select the paper and finally process.

I am halfway through this process already and it is a pain really. I
don't know, there must be a better way. I am considering buying a
printer but it is more expensive than the online labs I believe. On the
other hand I can print at my own pace as I finnish cropping/retouching
each photo.
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Anonymous
April 7, 2005 6:16:28 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Paiasoloco wrote:
> I realise that it's not a lot of work if you have to make 5, 10 event
> 50 at a time. But what happened to me and am sure it is a very common
> scenario it that on a 7 day trip to NY I took around 70 shots a day,
> that's 490 photos. After selection (which already takes a lot of time
> for me) I ended up with about 200 to upload to Mpix. From there I had
> to select size for either 1 photo at a time or the whole lot at once.
> Then go into the cropping feature they have which lets you specify
> where to make the crop given the selected format for every photo,
then
> select the paper and finally process.
>
> I am halfway through this process already and it is a pain really. I
> don't know, there must be a better way. I am considering buying a
> printer but it is more expensive than the online labs I believe. On
the
> other hand I can print at my own pace as I finnish
cropping/retouching
> each photo.

Yeah, at 200 photos this gets to be a pain, I normally do more like 20
at a time. You are right, you can't print at home for as low a cost as
you can with an oneline lab, at least not for 4 x 6 prints.

Scott
Anonymous
April 7, 2005 6:58:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Mismatched aspect ratios are nothing new. Right now, most of the small
digicams use 1.33 aspect ratio, but even that may change. And papers are
sized according to standards long before digital photography. Besides, you
can always print whatever size or aspect ratio you want and then trim.

"Paiasoloco" <fcalvo@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1112892473.132219.113820@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
> Is there any lab that would print a 1.33 aspect ratio format?
>
> Shooting digital I always need to accommodate to some of the 'usual'
> 1.4 (7x5), 1.5 (6x4 9x6 12x8) or 1.25 (10x8 5x4) formats just to name
> some popular ones. It seems that as many different formats as there
> are, there is not a 1,33 one!!!
>
> How can this be? given the popularity of digital format now?
>
> Pasiasoloco
>
Anonymous
April 7, 2005 10:27:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

All aspect ratios are arbitrary. There are no standards. They are not done
for the user but for technical reasons. I have more than the average number
of problems as I started as an arts photographer and tend to frame in the
camera. But, now I shoot for a publication where I can crop for maximum
impact to whatever size I want unless its for the cover.

8x10 was a standard...but (not to my knowledge) not based on anything that
came before.

This isn't really a problem in most cases. Just size your image as you want
it and with a border. Your commercial printer should offer the option of
full frame or no cropping.




"Paiasoloco" <fcalvo@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1112892473.132219.113820@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
> Is there any lab that would print a 1.33 aspect ratio format?
>
> Shooting digital I always need to accommodate to some of the 'usual'
> 1.4 (7x5), 1.5 (6x4 9x6 12x8) or 1.25 (10x8 5x4) formats just to name
> some popular ones. It seems that as many different formats as there
> are, there is not a 1,33 one!!!
>
> How can this be? given the popularity of digital format now?
>
> Pasiasoloco
>
Anonymous
April 8, 2005 12:37:03 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Paiasoloco wrote:

> Is there any lab that would print a 1.33 aspect ratio format?
>
> Shooting digital I always need to accommodate to some of the 'usual'
> 1.4 (7x5), 1.5 (6x4 9x6 12x8) or 1.25 (10x8 5x4) formats just to name
> some popular ones. It seems that as many different formats as there
> are, there is not a 1,33 one!!!
>
> How can this be? given the popularity of digital format now?
>
> Pasiasoloco
>
Just don't ask for borderless, and be willing to trim print, and that
should work fine.
Anonymous
April 8, 2005 12:40:55 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Gene Palmiter wrote:

> All aspect ratios are arbitrary. There are no standards. They are not done
> for the user but for technical reasons. I have more than the average number
> of problems as I started as an arts photographer and tend to frame in the
> camera. But, now I shoot for a publication where I can crop for maximum
> impact to whatever size I want unless its for the cover.
>
> 8x10 was a standard...but (not to my knowledge) not based on anything that
> came before.
>
> This isn't really a problem in most cases. Just size your image as you want
> it and with a border. Your commercial printer should offer the option of
> full frame or no cropping.
>
>
>
>
> "Paiasoloco" <fcalvo@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:1112892473.132219.113820@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
>
>>Is there any lab that would print a 1.33 aspect ratio format?
>>
>>Shooting digital I always need to accommodate to some of the 'usual'
>>1.4 (7x5), 1.5 (6x4 9x6 12x8) or 1.25 (10x8 5x4) formats just to name
>>some popular ones. It seems that as many different formats as there
>>are, there is not a 1,33 one!!!
>>
>>How can this be? given the popularity of digital format now?
>>
>>Pasiasoloco
>>
>
>
>

8 x 10 works very well for both 4 x 5 and 8 x 10 film formats. These
were both popular formats in the cut film camera days.
Anonymous
April 8, 2005 3:06:31 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <1112892473.132219.113820@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>,
"Paiasoloco" <fcalvo@gmail.com> wrote:

> Is there any lab that would print a 1.33 aspect ratio format?

Yes, of course! If they use roll paper.
>
> Shooting digital I always need to accommodate to some of the 'usual'
> 1.4 (7x5), 1.5 (6x4 9x6 12x8) or 1.25 (10x8 5x4) formats just to name
> some popular ones. It seems that as many different formats as there
> are, there is not a 1,33 one!!!
>
> How can this be? given the popularity of digital format now?
>
Unfortunately paper manufacturers are driven by cost and not by
convenience. The A and B paper series all have an ration of 1:1.41 or
3:4 as it's usually put. 35mm is 3:2 (1:1.5).

The photo paper and film sizes are
4x5 1.25
5x7 1.4
8x10 1.25
10x12 1.2
12x16 1.33
16x20 1.25

So only 12x16 fits the bill. However how often have you been completely
happy with the exact full frame of a picture? Do you never crop?

Paper makers are aiming at a size that 'looks good' when printed.

Photographers are aiming at a print that 'looks good'

It's hard to resolve these differences. But I believe you can't please
all the people all the time.
!